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INC . Year 2 Issue 1

INC . Year 2 Issue 1

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Published by OUSPJ
The 2009-2010 school year’s first issue of Inc., a newsletter
produced by Ohio University’s student chapter of the Society of
Professional Journalists for the entire J-School. Current SPJ President
Ian Bowman-Henderson, whose column can be found on the last page of this
issue, first created Inc. last winter. Also in this issue are society and
internship news, featured journalistic productions and a how-to story on
choosing a sequence.
The 2009-2010 school year’s first issue of Inc., a newsletter
produced by Ohio University’s student chapter of the Society of
Professional Journalists for the entire J-School. Current SPJ President
Ian Bowman-Henderson, whose column can be found on the last page of this
issue, first created Inc. last winter. Also in this issue are society and
internship news, featured journalistic productions and a how-to story on
choosing a sequence.

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Published by: OUSPJ on Sep 14, 2009
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Meeting
 Tuesday, 5:00SCRIPPS 111
Meet the Professors
 A publication of the Ohio University 
Society of Professional Journalists
For members of Ohio University’s chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists, a long year of hard work has paid off with a lotof recognition.The chapter was recognized at the 2009 SPJ National Conventionas the Outstanding Campus Chapter of Region 4. Each year, the 12“regions” in the nation pick a campus chapter that has been exemplaryin the service that they have provided to their students and to theircommunity. Those winners then compete for the national award.Former SPJ President Evan Millward says that he was “honored” tohear that the chapter had received the high distinction.“We put in a lot of work last year. Everyone really gave it 110percent,” Millward said, stating that several factors contributed to thechapter’s success at the national level, including the start of Inc., thebook drive and the public records service project.“We really started a dialogue about public records here in theuniversity community,” Millward said. “Not only did we do theeducation thing and the activism thing, we also did outreach.”Millward says that the award makes a difference not just to thecurrent students but also to prospective students and alumni.“It lends a lot of credibility to everything that we do from here onout. For prospective students, that’s just one more reason to come here,”Millward said. “For the students who are here, it’s an incentive to getinvolved and be a part of something big.”He also states that it is important to set a positive example forchapters of SPJ at other universities.“People are going to emulate what we do because now we have aproven formula for success.”Frank Deaner is the executive director of the Ohio NewspaperAssociation, as wellas an OU alumnus.He says he is happyto hear that OU SPJhas kept its notorietyas a nationally strongchapter.“From the very
rst time that I
became aware of [SPJ], I was instantlytold of the reputationthat the chapter had,”Deaner said. “Thathas remained prettyconsistent.”In the days beforethe Scripps endowments, when the journalism school was housed inthe basement of Copeland Hall, Deaner says that things were verydifferent for OU journalism students. Serving as vice-president, thenpresident of the OU SPJ chapter in the mid-1960’s, Deaner fondlyrecalls the activities and workshops that he and his contemporariesplanned, as well as the national workshops that allowed him to socialize
with the high-prole journalism personalities of the time. He says
that the cornerstones of SPJ (truth, talent and energy) are important to journalistic philosophy as a whole.“I think it’s the principles that SPJ stands for. The concept is thatthose are the principles that stay with you as a journalist,” Deaner said.“You’re using talent and energy to seek out the truth.” Deaner says that while many things have changed about the J-school atOU, the core feel of the program has stayed the same.“In going back [to OU] year after year, the general atmosphere is stillthe same,” said Deaner, citing the “spirit of the students” as the mainstrength. “I think it’s just a general fellowship among your peers.”Current OU SPJ chapter president Ian Bowman-Henderson says thathe thinks that the chapter excelled in the area of activism.“One thing I’m really proud of is that we went out and tried to be avoice of equity for the university,” Bowman-Henderson said, speakingof the chapter’s public records probe. “I think we did a really good jobof bringing in new ideas for programming,” he said, adding that he hasplans to expand the programming even more in this year.Bowman-Henderson says that he intends to keep up the traditionof excellence in the coming year by expanding programming andcontinuing to reach out to students in the J-school and in other coursesof study.“I’m really trying hard to make sure we have a good shot atnationals,” said Bowman-Henderson, who served as one of the chapter’sfreshman liaisons last year. “We’re going to show why, historically, thishas been an incredible chapter.”
n
 
Successful Year Brings Award to SPJ
Chapter wins region of the year
 story 
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Graylyn Roose art 
l
Rohan Kusre
Inside
Inc.
Page 2:
Society News
Page 3:
Internship Info
Page 4:
Picking a Sequence
Page 5:
From the President
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 A publication of the Ohio University 
Society of Professional Journalists
SPJ Member Takes on NYC
 story 
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Cameron Glover  art 
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Rohan Kusre
SOCIETY
NEWS
 After sophomore Taylor Mirfendereski spent a successful summer in Columbus while interning with the local newsstation, she is spending this quarter in New York City working with the TODAY Show.
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Summer internship:
NBC4 (WCMH-TV)
Job title:
General Assignment Intern
Dates of internship:
June 15 – August 31
City of internship:
Columbus, Ohio
Inc.:
What were your everyday duties?
Mirfendereski:
I would come into the station at 3 pm, sit at theassignment desk and check the wires and the day’s rundown. Mysupervisor would usually send me with a photographer or reporterto go cover a story. If I was only with the photographer, I had moreopportunities to conduct interviews myself and sometimes bring my owncamera along to practice shooting. When it was time to edit the story, Iwas able to observe and help the photographer put it together. My otherresponsibilities during the internship included answering phones, writingVoice Overs for the newscasts and assisting the web staff with projects. 
Inc.:
Any memorable moments?
Mirfendereski:
The thing I will remember most about this internship 30years from now is the phone calls that I received. The people who callthe station range from extremely polite toborderline crazy to actually crazy. Peoplecalled me crying, people called me whenthey were angry and people called just totalk. Many people use the news stationas an encyclopedia for information. I’vereceived calls about where to register theirkid for school and where the nearest gasstation is. I also received calls from a lot of people who would ask questions about theweather – “Is it 89 or 90 degrees today?”or “Is there going to be a thunderstorm?My dog hates thunder.” 
Inc.:
Describe your rst day on the job.
Mirfendereski:
My supervisor sent meon a story with a photographer. The storywas in Chillicothe and we made it backto the station with less than hour to sparebefore the 11pm newscast. I had to logall of the footage in the car and help him
write the script. We nished editing the
story and the photographer was kindenough to include my name in the anchorintroduction.
Current internship:
NBC’s TODAY Show
Job title:
Intern
Dates:
September 8 – November 31
City:
New York, NY 
Inc.:
How did you nd the position?
Mirfendereski:
The TODAY Show is one of Ohio University’sexclusive internships. Matt Lauer went to OU and has a partnership withthe school to allow OU students to intern at the TODAY Show. There is
an exclusive internship meeting in winter quarter, where you will nd
out more information about the internship and the application process itinvolves. 
Inc.:
What will you be working on this quarter?
Mirfendereski:
The TODAY Show does an excellent job of mixingclerical assignments with exciting assignments. I’ll have to answerphones, log tapes and make dubs, but then I’ll also have the opportunityto go on shoots, assist with the control room and conduct research forstories. I’ve already had the opportunity to meet with some TODAYShow anchors and producers, and in just
my rst week, I have worked on some
very meaningful assignments. I’m quicklylearning that this internship can be asexciting as I want it to be. The opportunitiesare there; I just have to pursue them. 
Inc.:
What kind of advice would you
give to students trying to nd high quality
internships?
Mirfendereski:
Know what you want anddon’t let anything stop you until you get it.It’s very cliché advice, but it couldn’t bemore true. No one cares about your careermore than you. The opportunities usuallydo not get thrown at you – you have toseek them out and make them happen. Ona more practical note, make sure you havea good, detailed résumé and build a greatportfolio that can be easily shared withpotential internship supervisors. I suggesthaving a version of your resume andportfolio online, so you can quickly shareyour work with companies that you wouldlike to intern with.
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CALENDAR
 
-Involvement Fair3:30 pm, Baker Center-The Post,Speakeasy, and -SPJ Meeting -RTNDA Meeting -KSU Media EthicsBackdrop Mtgs. 5:00 pm, Scripps 111 7:30 pm, RTV 371 Workshop, 8:00 am-SPJ Meeting5:00 pm, Scripps 111-SPJ Meeting5:00 pm, Scripps 111
 TUESDAY MONDAY SUNDAY 
WEDNESDAY 
THURSDAY 
FRIDAY 
SATURDAY 
SEPTEMBER
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INTERNSHIP
NEWS
 A publication of the Ohio University 
Society of Professional Journalists
G
Going into her rst day of her summer internship with C Magazine in
Columbus, Senior Annie Beecham couldn’t have been more surprised.
Her editor came in her small ofce and said he needed her to go with
him to an Argentinean restaurant and write a review needed for thenext day’s issue. Later that evening, she found herself sampling 12entrees; each with its own paired glass of wine, while interviewing therestaurant’s owner.“I learned a lot about food,” she said. “I was just in awe that this wasmy internship.”
Beecham took the position as an unpaid intern after ipping
through the small lifestyles and entertainment magazine for Columbusbusiness professionals while at a doctor’s appointment in May, and herexpectations of her daily duties and involvement were not sky high.She ended up completing several more restaurant review features, copyediting freelance work, researching and writing sidebars and workingwith the magazine’s advertisement team.“It was always pretty hectic. I would sit down to do something andmy editor would come in 10 minutes later with a laundry list of tasks,”Beecham said.
She was also responsible for running errands for the ofce, including
getting everyone’s coffee every morning. One of her more excitingerrands was venturing out to local designer shops to purchase variousexpensive gifts for certain clients. Beecham said she was leaving the
downtown ofce almost every day and knew “the quickest way to get
anywhere” by the end of the summer.Halfway through the internship she started to get paid for her work,and was even offered a full time position after she graduates from OhioUniversity. Beecham said that, right now, she is keeping her optionsopen. She also runs cross-country for OU and is eligible for another fullyear. She is considering picking up a minor or second major, if she stayson campus.Although Beecham’s internship was not the big-ticketed, New York
City magazine job of her dreams, she said she is satised with her
time she spent with C Magazine, and she suggests that students takeadvantage of the smaller, local opportunities.“Don’t be afraid to start small, and then just go for it,” she said.
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Don’t Judge a Job By its Size
Smaller internships can be just as rewarding, successful for students.
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