Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Week4_Phonemics1

Week4_Phonemics1

Ratings: (0)|Views: 33|Likes:
Published by eng4820

More info:

Published by: eng4820 on Sep 17, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/11/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Ling
 
170D
 
|
 
Intro
 
to
 
Linguistics
 
with
 
Dr.
 
Getty
 
|
 
Fall
 
2009
 
|
 
Week
 
5
 
part
 
1
 
|
 
Page
 
1
 
of 
 
8
 
Ling170D | Intro to Linguistics with Dr. Getty | Fall 2009Week 4 | The –Emes: Organizing Seemingly Messy Language Behavior
Cleaning
 
up
 
 from
 
last 
 
week 
 
 
Sonorants
 
vs.
 
Obstruents
 
[m,
 
n,
 
ŋ
,
 
l,
 
r,
 
w,
 
 j,
 
I,
 
all
 
vowels]
 
vs.
 
[p,
 
b,
 
t,
 
d,
 
k,
 
g]
 
Sonorant:
 
Free
 
flow
 
of 
 
air
 
out
 
of 
 
the
 
head
 
(if 
 
only
 
through
 
the
 
nose)
 
combined
 
with
 
voicing
 
Obstruent:
 
Mouth
 
is
 
closed
 
off 
 
and
 
velum
 
is
 
raised,
 
blocking
 
the
 
flow
 
of 
 
air
 
out
 
the
 
nose
 
Continuants
 
vs.
 
Obstruents
 
[f,
 
v,
 
θ
,
 
ð
,
 
s,
 
z,
 
ʃ
,
 
Ʒ
,
 
h,
 
l,
 
r,
 
w,
 
 j,
 
all
 
vowels]
 
vs.
 
[p,
 
b,
 
t,
 
d,
 
k,
 
g,
 
m,
 
n,
 
ŋ
]
Continuant:
 
Uninterrupted
 
flow
 
of 
 
air
 
out
 
of 
 
the
 
mouth,
 
with
 
or
 
without
 
voicing
 
Non
Continuant:
 
Mouth
 
is
 
closed
 
off,
 
with
 
or
 
without
 
flow
 
of 
 
air
 
out
 
through
 
the
 
nose
 
Part I: Phonemics
Consider
 
these
 
words:
 
Steak 
 
– 
 
Take
 
– 
 
Truck 
 
– 
 
Twin
 
– 
 
Water 
 
– 
 
Witness
 
Speaker
 
of 
 
English
 
have
 
a
 
sense
 
 –
 
captured
 
pretty
 
well
 
by
 
our
 
spelling
 
system
 
 –
 
that
 
the
 
sounds
 
suggested
 
by
 
the
 
letter
 
<t>
 
are
 
more
 
or
 
less
 
the
 
same.
 
If 
 
you
 
ask
 
people
 
how
 
many
 
different
 
‘sounds’
 
they
 
hear
 
in
 
these
 
words
 
when
 
cued
 
by
 
the
 
letter
 
<t>,
 
they
 
will
 
generally
 
tell
 
you
 
they
 
hear
 
one,
 
at
 
most
 
two.
 
Now
 
that
 
you’ve
 
been
 
focussing
 
on
 
articulatory
 
phonetics
 
for
 
weeks,
 
you
 
know
 
enough
 
to
 
know
 
that
 
the
 
reality
 
is
 
more
 
complex.
 
The
 
sounds
 
 –
 
or
 
to
 
use
 
a
 
term
 
we’ll
 
start
 
using
 
more
 
and
 
more
 
 –
 
the
 
segments
 
corresponding
 
to
 
<t>
 
in
 
these
 
words
 
are
 
very
 
different
 
little
 
beasts,
 
phonetically
 
speaking
 
 
Spelling
 
Narrow
 
Phonetic
 
Transcription
 
Segment
 
Corresponding
 
to
 
<t>
 
Steak 
 
[stejk]
 
[
t
]
 
Voiceless
 
alveolar
 
stop
 
Take
 
[t
h
ejk]
 
[
t
h
]
 
Aspirated
 
voiceless
 
alveolar
 
stop
 
Truck 
 
[
ʈ
r
ə
k]
 
[
ʈ
]
 
Voiceless
 
retroflex
 
stop
 
Twin
 
[t
w
w
I
n]
 
[
t
w
]
 
Voicless
 
labialized
 
alveolar
 
stop
 
Water 
 
[w
ɑɾ
r]
 
[
ɾ
]
 
Voiced
 
alveolar
 
flap
 
Witness
 
[wi
ɂ
tn
ə
s]
 
[
ɂ
t
]
 
Voiceless
 
glottalized
 
unreleased
 
alveolar
 
flap
 
 
Ling
 
170D
 
|
 
Intro
 
to
 
Linguistics
 
with
 
Dr.
 
Getty
 
|
 
Fall
 
2009
 
|
 
Week
 
5
 
part
 
1
 
|
 
Page
 
2
 
of 
 
8
 
How
 
could
 
millions
 
of 
 
otherwise
 
intelligent
 
people
 
not
 
notice
 
these
 
glaring
 
articulatory
 
differences?
 
Because
 
the
 
different
 
sounds
 
are
 
all
 
physical
 
manifestations
 
 –
 
made
 
with
 
the
 
meat
 
in
 
our
 
heads
 
 –
 
of 
 
a
 
sort
 
of 
 
idealized,
 
underlying,
 
mental
 
construct
 
called
 
a
 
 phoneme
.
 
The
 
Superhero
 
Paradigm
 
Think
 
of 
 
phonemes
 
and
 
their
 
phonetic
 
realizations
 
as
 
being
 
like
 
the
 
identities
 
of 
 
a
 
certain
 
superhero:
 
This
 
is
 
Superman.
 
He
 
wears
 
satin
 
tights,
 
appears
 
when
 
people
 
are
 
in
 
danger
 
and
 
shows
 
characteristics
 
that
 
are
 
adapted
 
to
 
those
 
contexts:
 
he
 
can
 
stop
 
bullets,
 
melt
 
steel
 
with
 
his
 
eyeballs,
 
and
 
fly
 
around.
 
This
 
is
 
Clark
 
Kent,
 
a
 
socially
 
awkward
 
reporter
 
with
 
the
 
Daily
 
Planet.
 
He
 
can
 
type
 
really
 
fast,
 
and
 
his
 
copy
 
isn’t
 
half 
 
bad,
 
but
 
he’s
 
never
 
around
 
when
 
all
 
the
 
really
 
exciting
 
stuff 
 
happens,
 
like
 
supervillains
 
trying
 
to
 
blow
 
up
 
Metropolis.
 
To
 
someone
 
who
 
 just
 
got
 
off 
 
the
 
bus
 
in
 
Metropolis,
 
there’s
 
no
 
reason
 
at
 
all
 
to
 
think
 
that
 
these
 
two
 
individuals
 
are
 
connected
 
to
 
each
 
other.
 
But
 
when
 
you
 
sit
 
down
 
and
 
start
 
to
 
do
 
some
 
analysis,
 
the
 
pieces
 
start
 
coming
 
together.
 
 
The
 
two
 
of 
 
them
 
have
 
a
 
similar
 
build,
 
hair
 
color,
 
and
 
eye
 
color.
 
 
Their
 
voices
 
and
 
accents
 
are
 
arrestingly
 
similar.
 
 
You
 
never
 
see
 
them
 
both
 
in
 
the
 
same
 
place
 
at
 
the
 
same
 
time:
 
o
 
Clark
 
Kent
 
disappears
 
 just
 
before
 
Superman
 
appears,
 
and
 
vice
versa.
 
o
 
You
 
never
 
see
 
Superman
 
working
 
at
 
Clark
 
Kent’s
 
desk
 
at
 
the
 
Daily
 
Planet.
 
o
 
You
 
never
 
see
 
Clark
 
Kent
 
flying
 
through
 
the
 
air
 
or
 
melting
 
steel
 
with
 
his
 
eyeballs.
 
 
Ling
 
170D
 
|
 
Intro
 
to
 
Linguistics
 
with
 
Dr.
 
Getty
 
|
 
Fall
 
2009
 
|
 
Week
 
5
 
part
 
1
 
|
 
Page
 
3
 
of 
 
8
 
So
 
after
 
a
 
great
 
deal
 
of 
 
analysis,
 
you
 
figure
 
out
 
that
 
“Superman”
 
and
 
“Clark
 
Kent”
 
don’t
 
really
 
exist
 
independently.
 
They
 
are
 
 just
 
different
 
public
 
faces
 
of 
 
a
 
more
 
mysterious
 
individual
 
 –
 
a
 
refugee
 
from
 
the
 
planet
 
Krypton
 
named
 
Kal
El,
 
son
 
of 
 
the
 
late
 
Mr.
 
Jor
El,
 
also
 
of 
 
Krypton.
 
We
 
never
 
really
 
see
 
Kal
El
 
 just
 
as
 
himself 
 
because
 
he
 
spends
 
all
 
his
 
time
 
in
 
settings
 
where
 
he
 
is
 
compelled
 
to
 
show
 
one
 
manifestation
 
or
 
another.
 
Phonemes
 
and
 
Their
 
Allophones
 
The
 
phonetic
 
segments
 
we
 
pronounce
 
when
 
cued
 
by
 
the
 
letter
 
<t>
 
in
 
steak 
 
– 
 
take
 
– 
 
truck 
 
– 
 
twin
 
– 
 
water 
 
– 
 
witness
 
are
 
like
 
Superman
 
and
 
Clark
 
Kent.
 
They
 
are
 
different
 
manifestations
 
of 
 
a
 
more
 
mysterious,
 
more
 
abstract
 
underlying
 
entity,
 
a
 
 phoneme
.
 
When
 
writing
 
this
 
stuff 
 
down,
 
we
 
enclose
 
phonemes
 
in
 
forward
leaning
 
slashes,
 
and
 
we
 
represent
 
them
 
with
 
symbols
 
that
 
suggest
 
their
 
underlying
 
characteristics.
 
For
 
the
 
segments
 
we’re
 
dealing
 
with
 
here,
 
we’ll
 
use
 
this:
 
/t/.
 
But
 
we
 
could
 
really
 
use
 
any
 
symbol,
 
even
 
something
 
like
 
/
/,
 
because
 
a
 
phoneme
 
is
 
not
 
a
 
sound;
 
it
 
is
 
a
 
purely
 
mental
 
construct.
 
It
 
lives
 
in
 
the
 
head
 
of 
 
an
 
English
 
speaker
 
as
 
an
 
abstract
 
representation
 
of 
 
something
 
that
 
is
 
realized
 
as
 
different
 
phonetic
 
segments
 
in
 
different
 
settings.
 
Phoneme:
 
/t/
 
Phonetic
 
realizations:[t]
 
[t
h
]
 
[
ʈ
]
 
[
ɾ
]
 
 

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->