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Kairos Issue #185

Kairos Issue #185

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Published by: kairosapts on Sep 19, 2009
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09/18/2009

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THE VOICE OF THE COMMUNITY 
1
kairoj
A Weekly Newspaper 
 What I Learned at my Internship Today:Thank God it is Saturday
Paul Dubois is a Senior MDiv Student under care of theUnited Methodist Church. He is completing a full year, full-time internship at University United MethodistChurch this academic year.
I hate it when my mind works slow, when I cannotfind the words that I need at an instant’s notice. Ihate thinking hours later what I should have said. Just now, I’m thinking what I wished I would havesaid to a friend.
We hadn’t spoken in a while, and we weregetting caught up on our lives and the goings-on of our families. He asked about my internship. I havefinished classes and am now three months into mySPM–a year-long internship at University UnitedMethodist Church. About half of my time is spent asthe staff liaison for our Open Doors ministry. Eachand every Saturday morning we provide breakfastand lunch to 400-500 people, and free clothing toabout 120 from our Fig Leaf Store. Not sincechildhood cartoons has Saturday morning been the best part of my week.
I told my friend about one of Saturday’sguests. I’ll call him Jesus. He was sitting alone at atable in the fellowship hall. It was about 10am, thetime between breakfast and lunch, when folks hangout in the air conditioning, having a drink, perhaps,or getting clothes from the Fig Leaf. I was amblingaround the hall, wiping down tables, picking up thestray dish or cup. We made eye contact andexchanged a pleasant greeting. He was about 35
cont on pg 2.
© 2009 Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary
Meet the Juniors
Put names and faceswith the new studentsand read their fun fact.
Page 2 & 3
What I Learned at MyInternship Today
An article offeringmusings, insights, andreflections on theSeminary life while atan SPM.
Page 1 & 2
Getting to know theCabinet
There are sixadministrative cabinetmembers that makeimportant decisions onbehalf of the seminary.
Page 7
Extensions of an OliveBranch
An article offering glimpses of peace, unityand reconciliation inthe world.
Page 5
Student Group Digest
Take a look at thestudent groups oncampus and see if youwould like to join or form your own student group.
Page 5-6
FREE Food
Opportunities for free food by IQ and IA.
Page 8
 
ISSUE 185 WWW.AUSTINSEMINARY.TYPEPAD.PORTAL/KAIROS.HTML
2
years old, Caucasian, and clean cut. He was readinga book, The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara, ahistorical novel about the Civil War battle atGettysburg. We struck up a casual conversation andI sat down. I grew up an hour south of Gettysburg,so I told him about visiting that battlefield, as well asAntietam, my personal favorite (if there can be afavorite for such things).
The conversation turned to his situation, andhis alcoholism. Jesus said that he has tried rehab. Hehas tried religion (especially the fundamentalistkind, he emphasized). He’s good when he’s sober,he said. He’s employable, and life is good. But hecannot stay away from the drink; once he drinks, hesoon finds himself back on the street. Someone atthe Salvation Army promised to get him into rehabagain... as soon as Jesus decides he’s ready to do it. Itis not, for Jesus, an easy decision. I noticed a slighttremor as he spoke. I almost cried. I sat there andlooked into his eyes. I wanted him to know that Isaw him, that I knew his name, and that I loved him.I wanted him to know that he was welcome to behere. Indeed, I was glad that he was here.
As I told my friend about my encounter with Jesus, I said that at Open Doors we’re called to feed,to clothe, and to be present with our brothers andsisters in their need. I said we’re not called to judgethem or to change them. I didn’t say that this feltinadequate to me, but it did, and does. My friendquestioned me on this, and asked, “What do youmean, that you’re not called to change them? Whydidn’t you tell him about the Gospel?” Here mytongue failed, or perhaps my heart; I don’t know. Istumbled through some words. I don’t reallyremember them, and don’t want to.
What I wish I would have said to my friendwas something like this. That I don’t really knowwhat it means to tell someone “about the Gospel.”Here I am, after three years of seminary, and I’m at aloss for what it means to tell someone “about theGospel.” But, on Saturday morning, anyone whodesires to enter our Open Doors is welcome.Substance abusers, cross-dressers, pregnant women,the dirty, smelly, plain ol’ down on their luck types,the mentally ill, and families with small children...we get them all, and all are welcome to come andpartake of the food we offer, and the place of restavailable, and the clothing that is theirs to take withthem. We are blessed by them, and the greatprivilege God has given us to serve them.
There are times a slow tongue is a virtue. Aslow tongue can keep one’s words from hurtinganother. Hurtful words spoken cannot be recalled.But there’s a time to turn the question, too. TheGood News is not present solely in the proclamation.Or perhaps the Gospel is proclaimed not solely bywords.
I’ll think about Jesus this week, and ourconversation about the Civil War and his alcoholism.I’d like to see him again, to deepen our relationship.But part of me hopes he doesn’t come back, that hissituation is improved and he no longer needs ourfood. He’s in my prayers this week.
 Jesus, of course, was not his real name, but,then again, it is.
Getting
 
to
 
know
 
the
 
 Juniors
Before
 
Fall
 
Break,
 
hopefully
 
all
 
new
 
students
 
and
 
special
 
students
 
will
 
be
 
introduced
 
to
 
the
 
community
 
and
 
a
 
fun
 
fact
 
will
 
be
 
shared
 
about
 
them
.
Plus
 
you
 
get
 
a
 
picture
 
with
 
a
 
name
.
 
ISSUE 185 WWW.AUSTINSEMINARY.TYPEPAD.PORTAL/KAIROS.HTML
3
Gail Yarborough
BS in Biology from University of Houston.First United Methodist Church,Lake Jackson, TX.She has a superpower of gettingsmiles from strangers andproclaims she is a non-electronicIMDB.
Holly Clark
BS in English, SchreinerUniversity.Covenant Presbyterian Church,Austin, TX.If she were a vegetable she would be fresh spinach because it is soversatile and claims “being a red-head is super-power enough!”
Laura Westerlage
BS in Religious Studies, AustinCollege.St. Paul Presbyterian Church,North Richlands, Hills, TX.The last novel she read was
Lamb,The Gospel According to Biff, Christ’sChildhood Pal
and is most scaredabout Greek & Hebrew while hereat APTS.
Molly Hatchell
 JD - South Texas College of LawWestminster Presbyterian Church,Austin, TX.If she could time travel she wouldgo back to the 50’s and if shelistened to one song all day itwould be Over the Rainbow.
 Whitney Payne
BA - Missions, Hardin SimmonsUniversity.Pioneer Drive Baptist Church,Abilene, TX.If she were to go to a desertedisland she would take an iPod,sunscreen and Diet Coke. She justfinished a year of ministry in NYCworking with immigrantcommunities.
Kristi Click
BA - Psychology and Religion,Schreiner University.Northpark Presbyterian Church,Dallas, TX.If she were a vegetable she would be an orange bell pepper becausethey are pretty, crunchy & sweet.She also has the superpower of selective hearing!

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