Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
5Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Chesukunna Karma

Chesukunna Karma

Ratings: (0)|Views: 216 |Likes:
Published by GRK Murty
Chesukunna Karma, Performed Karma, Tripuraneni Gopichand, GRK Murty, GRK, Short Story, Telugu,
Chesukunna Karma, Performed Karma, Tripuraneni Gopichand, GRK Murty, GRK, Short Story, Telugu,

More info:

Published by: GRK Murty on Sep 21, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/17/2011

pdf

text

original

 
1
Chesukunna Karma
 
(Performed
Karma
)
G V Krishna Rao
TranslatorGRK Murty
 
Chesukunna Karma
a Telugu story published in March 1947.
 
2
About the Author
Dr. G V Krishna Rao (1914-1979) belonged to Tenali, Andhra Pradesh, India. He has written four novels in Telugu, a volume of playlets, a couple of plays, a collection of short stories, and a
critical survey of the Buddhist philosopher Nagarjuna’s
Vigrahavyavartani
(The End ofDiscussions). He has also translated Plato and Kant into Telugu. His writings give us a truereflection of his personality
—“curious, humble, rationalistic, humane, and true to life.” His
playlet
Bikshapatra
(
Begging Bowl
)
—was proclaimed a ‘National Play’ and was translated into
sixteen Indian languages and broadcasted through All India Radio. His last play
Bommayedchindi
(
The Doll Wept
)
—portrays “a clash and crash of ideas and ideals” rather thanpersonalities, which “leaves the audience in a subdued mood of sorrow.”
Keelubommalu
(
Puppets
), his maiden work, has been acclaimed as one of the outstanding novels in Telugu
because of its ‘unity of effect’, achieved in portraying man as a mechanical doll—
a doll driven
more by “circumstances and animalism.” Hence, the need to change. In yet another novel,
Papikondalu
(
Papi Hills
), he advocates that ‘natural truth’ is
 
better than ‘didacticism.’
Eme
!
Ninne
!
1
 
Looks like, someone has come into the courtyard. Go and see.”
 
“Who would come now? It could be Raghavulu with the hay bundle,” says she,
while hurriedly breaking cow dung cakes to place them on the fire before thestraw in the hearth burns out.
Ha
! You and your intelligence! If it were Raghavulu, why does the milch cow
moo so restlessly? Go and see,” shouted the husband, a little harshly.
The jug filled with milk is right there. If I go out into the yard, she wonders, thecat may turn down the jug. Lakshuvamma, then asks her son who is hangingaround holding her 
sari entreating her to serve food, “
 Arey! Chittoda!
2
Go and
see who has come into the yard.”
 
1
 
Eme! Ninne!
a rustic way of calling wife in the countryside
—“Hey, You!”
 
2
 
 Arey! Chittoda
fond way of calling the youngest kid of the house.
 
3
Of late,
Chittodu
has become obstinate. Venkayya, on tying the
dhoti
3
aroundhis waist, looks at his wife. Setting the hearth on fire, she is transferring milkfrom the jug to an earthen pot. What can he say to a woman who is fullyoccupied? Wearily, he himself walks towards the courtyard.The eastern sun is fast rising. Putting his hand against the rising sun, he shouts,
“Who is it?”
 
“It is me, Sir.”
 Peering intently at the man walking towards him with a huge turban around his
head, Venkayya whispers, “Oh! You, Pullai, when did you come?”
 Seeing Venkayya, Pullayya removes his turban and keeping it on his shoulder 
replies: “Just now.”“Are the children and everything fine?”
 
“With your grace, so, so.”
 
“Had you needed our grace, would you stay this long without turning up thisside? If not for our sake, at least, for your son’s sake, whom you have left with
us? Have you seen your son, at least once in the last two years?
Tottukodaka
!
4
 Giving birth to children and leaving them to their fate! Animals are giving birth
and so are you!” Although Venkayya was scolding him, Pullayya is enjoying it,
for he could sense a kind of warmth in it.
3
 
Dhoti 
the loincloth worn by male Hindus.
4
 
Tottukodaka
a slang, son of a whore; used in the countryside in two ways: to abuse when angry with someone;two, to chide someone affectionately
of course, only when one is sure that the other person would not takeoffense.

Activity (5)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
barbcohen39 liked this
finder08 liked this
rajub1 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->