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Lone Wolf Narcissist

Lone Wolf Narcissist

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Published by zadanliran
Some narcissists are lone wolves, recluses, or hermits. They loathe human company and avoid it. All narcissists go through such phases of withdrawal, integral parts of their idealization-devluation cycles (approach-avoidance repetition complex.) Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) and Schizoid Personality Disorder share the same aetiology, psychodynamics, traits (such as grandiosity) and behavior patterns.
Some narcissists are lone wolves, recluses, or hermits. They loathe human company and avoid it. All narcissists go through such phases of withdrawal, integral parts of their idealization-devluation cycles (approach-avoidance repetition complex.) Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) and Schizoid Personality Disorder share the same aetiology, psychodynamics, traits (such as grandiosity) and behavior patterns.

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Published by: zadanliran on Jan 15, 2014
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02/17/2015

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 The Lonely and Recluse Narcissist Comorbid Narcissistic and Schizoid Personality Disorders By: Sam Vaknin 
 
Narcissists, Inverted Narcissists and Schizoids
 Narcissistic Personality Disorder  and Schizoid Personality Disorder  share the same aetiology,   psychodynamics, traits (such as grandiosity) and behavior patterns.
Question: 
 Some narcissists are not gregarious. They avoid social events and are stay-at-home recluses. Doesn't this behaviour go against the grain of narcissism?
Answer: 
 
I. The Common Psychological Constructs of Narcissistic and Schizoid Disorder
 Click  here to read the definition of the Schizoid Personality Disorder (SPD) in the DSM-IV- TR [2000]. Click here to read a description of the Schizoid Personality Disorder (SPD) and some treatment notes. Or, as the Howard H. Goldman (Ed.) in the "Review of General Psychiatry" [4th Edition. London, Prentice Hall International, 1995] puts it:
"The person with Schizoid Personality Disorder sustains a fragile emotional equilibrium by avoiding intimate personal contact and thereby minimising conflict that is poorly tolerated." 
 Schizoids are often described, even by their nearest and dearest, in terms of  automata  ("robots"). They are uninterested in social relationships or interactions and have a very limited emotional repertoire. It is not that they do not have emotions, but they express them  poorly and intermittently. They appear cold and stunted, flat, and "zombie"-like. Consequently, these people are loners. They confide only in first-degree relatives, but maintain no close bonds or associations, not even with their immediate family. Naturally, they gravitate into solitary activities and find solace and safety in being constantly alone. Their sexual experiences are sporadic and limited and, finally, they cease altogether. Schizoids are anhedonic - find nothing pleasurable and attractive - but not necessarily dysphoric (sad or depressed). Some schizoid are asexual and resemble the cerebral narcissist.  They pretend to be indifferent to praise, criticism, disagreement, and corrective advice (though, deep inside, they are not). They are creatures of habit, frequently succumbing to rigid, predictable, and narrowly restricted routines. Intuitively, a connection between SPD and the  Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) seems  plausible. After all, narcissists are people who self-sufficiently withdraw from others. They love themselves in lieu of loving others. Lacking empathy, they regard others as mere instruments, objectified "Sources" of   Narcissistic Supply. 
 
The inverted narcissist (IN) is a narcissist who "projects" his narcissism onto another narcissist. The mechanism of projective identification allows the IN to experience his own narcissism vicariously, through the agency of a classic narcissist. But the IN is no less a narcissist than the classical one. He is no less socially reclusive. A distinction must be made between social interactions and social relationships. The schizoid, the narcissist and the inverted narcissist
 – 
 all interact socially. But they fail to form human and social relationships (bonds). The schizoid is uninterested and the narcissist is both uninterested and incapable to due to his lack of empathy and pervasive sense of  grandiosity.  The psychologist H. Deutsch first suggested the construct of "as-if personality" in the context of schizoid patients (in an article, published in 1942 and titled "Some forms of emotional disturbance and their relationship to schizophrenia"). A decade later, Winnicott named the very same idea as the "False-self Personality". The False Self has thus been established as the driving engine of both pathological narcissism and pathological schizoid states. Both C. R. Cloninger and N. McWilliams (in "Psychoanalytic Diagnosis", 1994) observed the "faintly contemptuous (attitude) ... (and) isolated superiority" of the schizoid - clearly narcissistic traits. Theodore Millon and Roger Davis summed it up in their seminal tome, "Personality Disorders in Modern Life" (2000):
"Where withdrawal has an arrogant or oppositional quality, fantasy in a schizoidlike person sometimes betrays the presence of a secret grandiose self that longs for respect and recognition while offsetting fears that the person is really an iconoclastic freak. These individuals combine aspects of the compensating narcissist with the autistic isolation of the schizoid, while lacking the asocial and anhedonic qualities of the pure prototype." 
 (p. 328)
II. Cultural Considerations in Narcissistic and Schizoid Disorder
 The ethno-psychologist George Devereux [Basic Problems of Ethno-Psychiatry, University of Chicago Press, 1980] proposed to divide the unconscious into the Id (the part that is instinctual and unconscious) and the "ethnic unconscious" (repressed material that was once conscious). The latter includes all the defence mechanisms and most of the Superego. Culture dictates what is to be repressed. Mental illness is either idiosyncratic (cultural directives are not followed and the individual is unique, eccentric, and schizophrenic)
 – 
 or conformist, abiding by the cultural dictates of what is allowed and disallowed. Our culture, according to Christopher Lasch, teaches us to withdraw inwards when confronted with stressful situations. It is a vicious circle. One of the main stressors of modern society is alienation and a pervasive sense of isolation. The solution our culture offers
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 to further withdraw
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 only exacerbates the problem. Richard Sennett expounded on this theme in "The Fall of Public Man: On the Social Psychology of Capitalism" [Vintage Books, 1978]. One of the chapters in Devereux's aforementioned tome is entitled "Schizophrenia: An Ethnic Psychosis, or Schizophrenia without Tears". To him, the United States is afflicted by what came later to be called a "schizoid disorder".

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