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Farm Life Chapter 3

Farm Life Chapter 3

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Published by Al
Martha is seventeen and living in a sterile domed city. She questions what she sees outside the walls, why people were arrested, how they came to be living behind the wall, those things were almost unknowable. Martha went to the tennis club, masseuse, and nail clinic asking questions and getting strange looks but few answers.
Martha is seventeen and living in a sterile domed city. She questions what she sees outside the walls, why people were arrested, how they came to be living behind the wall, those things were almost unknowable. Martha went to the tennis club, masseuse, and nail clinic asking questions and getting strange looks but few answers.

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Published by: Al on Sep 21, 2009
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01/03/2013

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As muchas shedismissedher motherfrom herthoughtsassomeonewho hadnoinfluencein her lifeit was hermotherwho
 
indoctrinated her to do what she was now doing. Helping theless fortunate was how her mother justified the waste of anevening going to a drab party for dull people to give some of her own sparkle to the event. Her mother would say it isimportant that those directly beneath us think well of usbecause our feet are planted on their heads.It only made sense to first give bread to the hungrybefore washing the sores of the afflicted. What should havebeen well known but was very easy to forget is that theplague was not transmitted by bathing them, or touchingthem in most ways. She changed bandages for their comfortsince oozing sores never healed. Easing their final days wasnot a form of life extension and providing them lastmoments of relief did not insure Martha’s social prominence.There was no haut society in Iowa although the classeswere well defined. Spheres of influence were small butrestrictions were enforced here as rigorously as Washington.A worker could elevate himself to a manager. Every positionin all of society was as narrow as it’s title in a culture thatwas deeply detailed. The new restrictions were proposed byschools, hospitals and business eventually became the lawswritten and enforced by government, busy work for electedpoliticians which created new classes with newresponsibilities and giving those class members somethingto do and everyone something to talk about. GovernmentOffices and positions with titles instead of numbers werebones thrown to retired movie stars and war heroes, eventhe Army was only for show, the fighting and the profitablecleaning up was done by contractors, recruited vigilantesand free lance terrorists. Security guards thugs handledhome security for the elites, crowd control and lawenforcement they turned surviving criminals over to thepolice for locked up and booking. This style of governingsaved the taxpayer revenue tax payer were in heavy declineas machines now designed and built machines that suppliedgoods. Bread one week, milkaid the next, breakfast flakes,shoes, availability depending on the corn being harvested,summer, winter, marsh grown. Energy required to dictate
 
and enforce things that society was already doing was atremendous waste of the surviving resources and the resultswere counter productive in all ways except one. Of thosewho would protest the general condition none had thestrength to do anything about it.When she first left the community of steel and glassthat dominated the eastern coastline of Iowa along theMississippi Sea, she had no idea it would place her in theliteral belly of society. It was like descending from the purityof austere thought into sweat and fermentation. Here wasthe core of oppression and depth of inhumanity. Escapedfarm works fled to the cities to become undocumentednonpersons, for them laying on a slab of concrete under anartificial sky was a better life. She had seen growing up thebeggars who crouched outside restaurants, certified asplague free and eligible to receive alms but escapees fromoutside Iowa became the refugees who could not enter thegates or come near the glassed off areas. They lived on thebeach eating polluted mollusks, deformed crabs they couldcatch and what they gleaned from the refuse piles thatsurrounded the city.The poor here were right at hand and unavoidable,hungry while living in this mythical place where food wasactually produced almost within view of the dome. Foodproduction had been a mystery until she married a certifiedexpert who judiciously combined water, light and of courseseed in the soil. Not far from their fence waiting withouthope those who were the most hungry yet could not be fedwithout all of the proper paperwork done, cards issued byone department and stamped by another, no federallyfunded soup given until the number issued matched thegivers name. Workers both public and private made surepapers were in order and security guards kept the peacewhen a hunger case got cast out of line. Wielding of powerto control the small mob of sick and docile beggars satisfiedthe working poor and the other tax payers. That was theimage now that made America great adding to their spiritualnourishment by creating and upholding the illusion that

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