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January 2014 Nebraska Farm Bureau News

January 2014 Nebraska Farm Bureau News

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Water Conservation Not New to Farmers; Stumpf Family Gift Supports Ag Research at University of Nebraska; Stallman: Grassroots Strength, Strategy Drive Success; Crop Growers Told to Prepare for Low Price Era; Grassroots Action Needed on Clean Water Act Proposal; Calendar of Events; Nebraska Farm Bureau Honored for Excellence; Symposium to Initiate Conversation on Wind Energy Development in Nebraska; Big Data to Bring Innovation to Food Production; Agriculture Apps Continue Growing; Nebraska Farmers' Ideas on Ag Data Go Over "BIG" in Texas; Farm Bureau Delegates Set Public Policy Positions for 2014; Farm Bureau to Focus on Familiar Issues in 2014 Legislative Session; OSHA Shouldn't Go Against the Grain; Water Funding Task Force Recommends Committing $50 Million to Water Programs; Unguarded Rural Intersections Tested; Drones Hold Great Promise for Agriculture; Ag Secretary Vilsack Urges Understanding of Agriculture; Open Dialogue Key to Changing Conversation about GMOs; Expected Improvements for Livestock Markets in 2014.
Water Conservation Not New to Farmers; Stumpf Family Gift Supports Ag Research at University of Nebraska; Stallman: Grassroots Strength, Strategy Drive Success; Crop Growers Told to Prepare for Low Price Era; Grassroots Action Needed on Clean Water Act Proposal; Calendar of Events; Nebraska Farm Bureau Honored for Excellence; Symposium to Initiate Conversation on Wind Energy Development in Nebraska; Big Data to Bring Innovation to Food Production; Agriculture Apps Continue Growing; Nebraska Farmers' Ideas on Ag Data Go Over "BIG" in Texas; Farm Bureau Delegates Set Public Policy Positions for 2014; Farm Bureau to Focus on Familiar Issues in 2014 Legislative Session; OSHA Shouldn't Go Against the Grain; Water Funding Task Force Recommends Committing $50 Million to Water Programs; Unguarded Rural Intersections Tested; Drones Hold Great Promise for Agriculture; Ag Secretary Vilsack Urges Understanding of Agriculture; Open Dialogue Key to Changing Conversation about GMOs; Expected Improvements for Livestock Markets in 2014.

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Published by: Nebraska Farm Bureau Federation on Jan 22, 2014
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Things To Do to Put Your Policy in Action
• Build relationships with state and national leaders• Share your story through FB-ACT. See more on page A2.
page B1
Nebraska Policy Idea Goes National
Nebraska
Farm Bureau News
 JANUARY 22, 2014
VOL. 32 ISSUE 1
MOREINSIDE
Farm Bureau Membership Is About You!
page A4
Everything's BIG in Texas at AFBF Convention
page A6
Wind Energy Discussed in Nebraska
page A13
The Value of Nebraska Water
page B6
Drones: The Sky's the Limit
page B8
County Farm BureauYour IdeaState Legislative PolicyCommitteeState VotingDelegatesYour IdeaBecomesPolicy National Policy to AFBF Convention
It starts withYOU!
AFBF Annual ConventionSan Antonio, TexasJan. 11-15, 2014
 
A2
 JANUARY 22, 2014 Nebraska Farm Bureau News
VOLUME 32 ISSUE 1  January 22, 2014USPS 375-780 ISSN 0745-6522
Official publication of Nebraska Farm Bureau Federation
402-421-4400www.nefb.org
Nebraska Farm Bureau’s Mission: Strong Agriculture...... Strong Nebraska
Yearly subscription: 50 cents of membership duesAssociate Member: Nebraska Press Association
EDITORIAL STAFF
Editor/Advertising/Writer:
Tina Henderson tinah@nefb.org or ext. 4446
Writer:
Craig Head craigh@nefb.org or ext. 4435
Writer:
Kassi Williams kassiw@nefb.org or ext. 4730
Graphic Designer/County News/Photo Contest:
Tara Grell tarag@nefb.org or ext. 4494
Want Ads and County Annual Meeting Notices:
Kylee Planer kyleep@nefb.org or ext. 4485
NEBRASKA FARM BUREAU FEDERATION
Steve Nelson, president (Axtell)Mark McHargue, first vice president (Central City)Rob Robertson, chief administrator/ secretary-treasurer (Lincoln)
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Sherry Vinton, second vice president (Whitman)Nathan Bartels (Elk Creek)Don Benner (Central City)Leslie Boswell (Shickley)Andy DeVries (Ogallala)David Grimes (Raymond) Jason Kvols (Laurel)Scott Moore (Bartley)Myles Ramsey (Kenesaw)Todd Reed (Lincoln)Tanya Storer (Whitman)
NEBRASKA FARM BUREAU NEWS
 is published monthly, except July, by Nebraska Farm Bureau Federation, 5225 South 16th St., Lincoln, NE 68512. Periodicals postage paid at Lincoln, NE and additional entry offices.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to:
Nebraska Farm Bureau NewsAttn: Tina HendersonP.O. Box 80299, Lincoln, NE 68501
Top 4 Ways to Advocate
Farm Bureau’s Agri-cultural Contact Team (FB-ACT) is the Nebraska Farm Bureau Federa- tion’s grassroots action network. When we reach out to state lawmakers or Congress, we impact the decisions they make.FB-ACT advances agri-cultural and rural interests by connecting elected officials to those people who matter most –  their constituents.Passing legislation that supports our issues is a challenging process that requires active participa- tion by our members. You can make a difference by:
SEND A LETTER
 As a con-stituent, your lawmakers and political appointees know that you are the key  to their understanding of issues important to you. They want and need to hear from you on issues you consider important.
MAKE A PHONE CALL
 When you need to get in touch with your lawmaker immedi-ately, and don’t have the  time to craft a letter or email, that’s when it’s time  to use the most common method of communicating with your lawmakers – make a phone call!
MEET FACE TO FACE
 By far, the most effec- tive way to articulate your views to your elected of-ficials and positively affect  the outcome of legislation and of policy debates is  to speak with lawmakers face to face.
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
 You can send a letter  to the editor to many news-papers via email rather than hand-writing them. Go to our online Legislative Action Center to find media outlets in your area, and send them a message. It only takes a minute.For more information about getting involved in FB-ACT visit nefb.org or call 402-421-4409.
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Dec. 16 Omaha World-Herald editorial raises an opportunity to hold more discussion about the expansion of irrigated acres on Nebraska farms.The editorial was based on a University of Nebraska-Lincoln Agricultural Economics piece that pointed out  the growing trend of dryland farm acres being convert-ed to irrigated acres and the possibility that sometime down the road we’ll have more irrigated than dryland acres in our state.The editorial rightly points out the importance of Nebraskans embracing sound water conservation ideas, but it may have led some readers to believe that more irrigated acres means more water use.While it would be easy to jump to that conclusion,  that thinking misses out on one very important point: Nebraska farmers have been working to get better at conserving water using new practices and new tech-nologies. The proof is in the numbers.According to the most recent data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the number of irrigated acres in Nebraska increased from 7.8 million in 2000  to 8.3 million in 2005. (The 2010 data from the USGS are expected sometime in late 2014.) During  that same timeframe, the amount of irrigation water used in Nebraska actually declined from 9.8 million acre-feet per year in 2000 to 9.4 million acre-feet per year in 2005.How is it possible to have more irrigated acres but use less water? Many farmers have aggressively worked  to better manage how water is used on the farm. From  the equipment used to the seeds put in the soil, the goal for most is to get more out of each drop of water.Today, technology and new conservation practices are allowing farmers to monitor applications and collect data to aid in making timely decisions about when and where to apply water to help ensure they are conserv-ing and enhancing efficiency.Farmers now have the ability to do a better job of measuring their crops’ water use, water needs and keep tabs on soil moisture content. Many farmers are on the path of converting from gravity irriga- tion systems to center-pivot irrigation systems that enhance efficiency. In some cases, farmers are using subsoil irrigation systems that put water directly into  the crop’s root zone.New technologies in seed varieties that use less water, developed through research at land-grant universities and private companies, also are making  their way into Nebraska crop fields. Changes in till-age practices, cropping rotations and adjusting plant populations are other tools used to save water. It’s  the combination of all of these that allows us to help raise food using less water.These changes are being made to not only help us be better farmers but because of a belief that we have an obligation and responsibility for preserving water re-sources for the next generations — not just those that live on the farm.Despite our efforts, we can’t escape the fact that raising food requires water. We all need to eat. And in Nebraska, irrigation has implications beyond the dinner plate. A Nebraska Farm Bureau-funded study released earlier this year showed that irrigation contributes $11 billion to Nebraska’s economy. It also creates more  than 30,000 Nebraska jobs, which, if all were located in one county, would be Nebraska’s 10th largest.The connection among irrigation, food production,  jobs and Nebraska’s broader economy is the reason we believe so strongly that managing our water resources is a statewide issue.Innovations and improvements in water conserva- tion will continue on the farm, but we all share some responsibility in helping ensure we have sound long- term water policy. This includes developing the water programs, projects and activities needed to make sure water continues to be available to all of Nebraska’s water users in the future.
The President’s Message
By Steve Nelson, PresidentNebraska Farm Bureau Federation
®
Water Conservation Not New to Farmers
 
Nebraska Farm Bureau News JANUARY 22, 2014
A3
COUNTY NEWS
Stumpf Family Gift Supports Ag Research at University of Nebraska
A generous gift of more than $3 million provides the University of Nebraska with potential to take wheat breeding and crop-ping systems research to a new level of in-novation not seen since the early days of plant genetics.Marvin H. Stumpf III of Grant, Neb., and member of the Perkins County Farm Bu-reau, has made the gift to the University of Nebraska Foundation to establish the Stumpf Family Research and Development Fund to support agricultural research and university extension services. The contribu- tion includes a $1 million outright gift and donation of 640 acres of land in Perkins county, located in southwest Nebraska, with an appraised market value of more  than $2 million.“This gift is about honoring my family and our Nebraska heritage,” Marvin Stumpf said. “This state has meant so much to genera- tions of my family, and it’s a privilege to give back in a way that will further agricultural research and service well into the future.”Ronnie Green, University of Nebraska vice president and Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources Harlan vice chan-cellor, said Marvin Stumpf’s rich and active legacy will live on through these gifts pro-viding researchers, faculty and students  the opportunity to make new discoveries on his land.“We are excited about the additional opportunities this donation creates for the wheat industry in Nebraska and even more excited about the future impact our partner-ship will have on our state, region and world since as much as 50 percent of Nebraska’s wheat is annually exported to international markets,” Green said. “The wheat industry is big business in Nebraska, with between 65 and 75 million bushels grown each year.”Archie Clutter, dean of the Agricultural Research Division at the University of Ne-braska-Lincoln, said, “UNL’s robust wheat and cropping-systems research programs will grow even stronger with the help of this generous gift from the Stumpf family. This Perkins county location will add important representation of high-plains, semi-arid pro-duction to the UNL system of integrated re-search and allow accelerated progress in the development and application of new plant science biotechnologies.”A Nebraska native, Marvin Stumpf worked for the U.S. Postal Service in Den-ver and received a degree from Metropoli- tan State University in Denver. He returned  to Nebraska to help his parents, Henry J. and Darlene Stumpf, with the family farm. Through hard work and determination, the family built the farm into a successful en- terprise in Perkins county where Stumpf continues to live and work. The family’s use of dryland cropping techniques, combined with organic farming experience, are the  tangible results of their willingness to experi-ment with new ideas while using the land to its fullest potential.In making this gift to the university, Mar-vin Stumpf said he wishes to honor the legacy of his family, including his late wife, Pearl Stumpf, his grandparents, Henry J. and Margaret Stumpf, his parents Henry J. and Darlene Stumpf, and his wife’s late husband, Sam Peterson.“The Stumpf family devoted their lives to acquiring and improving their land through  the use of good farm management prac- tices,” Green said. “Their desire to honor  the hard work and sacrifices of their fam-ily members by using the property for the benefit of the citizens of Nebraska and U.S. is commendable.”The gift also provides support to the University of Nebraska’s current fundrais-ing initiative, the Campaign for Nebraska: Unlimited Possibilities, and a top priority  to increase support for agriculture and life sciences programs.
Perkins County Farm Bureau Marvin Stumpf (left) gave a gift of $1 million and 640 acres appraised at $2 million to the University of Nebraska for wheat breeding and crop-ping systems research. Stumpf is pictured with former Nebraska Farm Bureau Federa-tion President Keith Olsen, also a Perkins County Farm Bureau member.
#NEYFR14
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@NEFarmBureauNebraska FarmBureau
New Northeast Regional Director of Membership Hired
Megan Kvols of Laurel, Neb., has ac-cepted the Northeast Regional Director of Membership position within the member-ship department. Kvols replaces Clark Kin-nison, who retired in November, Del Ficke, director of membership services, said Jan. 10. Kvols’ first day with Nebraska Farm Bu-reau will be Jan. 27.“We are very excited to make this an-nouncement. We look forward to Megan coming in to our Farm Bureau family, build-ing new relationships and continuing our ef-forts to place a stronger emphasis on mem-bership,” he said.Megan and her husband, Greg, operate a corn and soybean farm near Laurel and are members of Cedar County Farm Bureau. They also help oversee a family cow/calf operation near Whitney.Megan is currently operating her own publishing company in which she has published four children’s books and she is also providing freelance writing servic-es to a variety of online companies. She has several years of corporate sales and management experience including four years of being a district sales manager for Corporate Avon.She was a 2002 honors graduate from  the University of Nebraska-Lincoln where she majored in elementary education and social sciences. Right after college she taught kindergarten and first grades at Greeley-Wolbach schools and then third and fourth grades in the Omaha Public schools.“Kvols brings an excellent skill set to  the position in terms of communications, marketing and sales experience as well as a passion for agriculture that should serve our members, County Farm Bureaus and Nebraska Farm Bureau well in the northeast district,” Ficke said.She and her husband have a four-year-old daughter, Elizabeth, and two-year-old twin boys, Jake and Grant.
Greg and Megan Kvols

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