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Belle Alliance Wargame rules

Belle Alliance Wargame rules

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Published by airfix1999
Belle Alliance
Battalion level wargame rules
Lots of tables...
Lexnet 2001 2nd edition
Belle Alliance
Battalion level wargame rules
Lots of tables...
Lexnet 2001 2nd edition

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Published by: airfix1999 on Sep 24, 2009
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04/29/2013

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B E L L EA L L I A N C E
Wargame Rules for theNapoleonic Period 1809-1815at the Battalion LevelLexnet 2001
Second edition
 
Belle Alliance, second edition, 18 June 2001Page 1
Contents
Comments and questions are welcome at:rules@lexnet.dk Pictures from wargames may be seen at:www.lexnet.dk © Lexnet 2001Introduction...................... 21.0.0 Organisation.................. 31.1.0 Game structure1.2.0 Tactical units1.3.0 Formations2.0.0 Movement................... 82.1.0 Splitting and assembly2.2.0 Change of formation2.3.0 Marching2.4.0 Change of direction3.0.0 Firing....................... 123.1.0 Common rules3.2.0 Closed formations3.3.0 Skirmish lines andsoutien3.4.0 Artillery4.0.0 Melee (attack and defence)........ 174.1.0 Common rules4.2.0 Forced back 4.3.0 Skirmish lines andsoutien4.4.0 Cavalry4.5.0 Artillery5.0.0 Moral....................... 225.1.0 Common rules5.2.0 LD (light disorder)5.3.0 MD (medium disorder)5.4.0 FD (full disorder)5.5.0 Valour and supplies6.0.0 Special issues.................. 266.1.0 Urban combat6.2.0 Wood combat6.3.0 Field work Tables.......................... 29Index........................... 47
Tables
Table 1: Phases of the bound......... 29Table 2: Field of sight............... 30Table 3: Rate of march.............. 31Table 4: Passage of obstacles.......... 32Table 5: Obstacles and cover.......... 32Table 6: Positive and negative factorsfor hand weapons................. 33Table 7: Positive and negative factorsfor artillery....................... 34Table 8: Positive and negative factorsfor melee........................ 35Table 9: Positive and negative factorsfor spread of rout.................. 36Table 10: Engaging of commandingofficer.......................... 36Table 11: Result of melee............ 36Table 12: Loss and moral............ 37Table 13: Range of fire for handweapons......................... 37Table 14: Range of fire for artillery..... 37Table 15: Reduction of valour......... 38Table 16: Reorganisation............. 38Table 17: Ordering roll.............. 39Table 18: Catch roll for staff figures.... 39Table 19: Replacement of commandingofficer.......................... 39Table 20: Field work................ 40Table 21: Valour 1813-1815.......... 41
 
Belle Alliance, second edition, 18 June 2001Page 2
Introduction
This set of wargame rules for the Napoleonicperiod was developed through trial games duringthe years 1996-2000. A first edition waspublished under the working title Depressionover the Hebrides.The main principle of this set of rules is toprovide clear and predictable rules that allow formanoeuvre on the wargames terrain, and whichrespect that the game will be played with modelsoldiers in accurately painted uniforms. This callsfor rules that rely on the discretion of theumpire in as few circumstances as possible. Also,it calls for high rates of march, makingregrouping and renewed attacks possible evenduring shorter games. Finally it calls for lossesand attrition to be illustrated as far as possibleby the figures on the wargames terrain.Thus, the important issue is not whether a givenrate of march corresponds to what was actuallypossible during the length of time represented bya game bound, or whether the losses sufferedcorrespond to what was actually possible fromvolleys fired during such a length of time.Instead, the important issue is whether the ruleslead to a range of possible decisions to be madeby the player that corresponds to the rangeavailable to a general in the field during theNapoleonic period, and whether the making of such decisions leads to convincing results on thewargames terrain.Contrary to games such as chess, where only theinteraction of the players may lead tounpredictable results, the wargame also takes inthe factor of unpredictability following from thepossibility that the tactical dispositions might notalways be carried out as ordered. This leads to afriction in the wargame, where tactical plansmight not be executed as intended by theplayers, and one of the tasks upon the players isto take into consideration not only the actions of the opponent but also this uncertainty as to theexecution of own orders.This uncertainty is represented by the roll of dice, using three dice, which gives a flat curve of probability. Any sound tactical disposition leadsto points added to the roll of dice, whereasunsound dispositions lead to points subtracted.Thus, the game is operated neither bydeterminism nor by pure chance, but instead bya weighted probability leading to a greaterchance that sound tactical dispositions will beexecuted as ordered.Units in a degree of disorder will have their rateof march reduced, thus representing thatdisorder increases the difficulty in coordinatingtactical dispositions. The rate of loss is set high,as the losses represent not only an actual loss innumbers but also the attrition of the fightingpower of a unit. Furthermore, a loss in figuresleads to a lowering of the valour assigned to aunit that represents the training and morale of the unit. Supply was a recurring problem also inthe Napoleonic period, which could berepresented in the wargame by a bookkeepingsystem. Instead, supply problems are determinedby a chance event, and after the occurrence of this event, a unit will have supplies only for alimited further period. This gives the player theoption of re-supplying or replacing the unit.Command control problems are regulated by therules only for the brigade commander, whilstproblems for other commanding officers arerepresented by the uncertainty that inevitably willfollow from the interaction of the actual players.It seems obvious that a wargame withcompletely simultaneous bounds will give thebest direct simulation of reality, whereas the useof alternating bounds will give the best controlof the game. The use in the present set of rulesof the phased bound represents a compromisebetween these options.The rules have been made for use with 25 mmfigures on a 1 to 20 man scale and with thebattalion as the tactical unit of disposition.However, the rules may be adapted for otherfigure sizes and scales. The basing employed is15 by 15 mm for infantry, 20 by 45 mm forcavalry, and 50 by 75 mm for artillery, to whichis added basing for limbers. Infantry and cavalryare normally based two abreast.The wargame units are deployed in theformations used in the Napoleonic period, on amodel terrain on which hills are represented bylayers placed on top of each other, and wherebuildings, woods, rivers, bridges and roads arerepresented by models looking like the terrainfeature they represent.Peter GjørtlerVangede, Denmark, 2001

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