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Accelerating into Control

Accelerating into Control

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Researchers have generally found that entrepreneurs are more optimistic and more confident than non-entrepreneurs. While it may help entrepreneurs persevere in the face of potential business failure, we cannot mistake their confidence for always knowing what to do with their business idea. Entrepreneurs in fact seek out mentors and other useful connections to help them succeed throughout the growth of their businesses, particularly at the start. Many entrepreneurs seek advice informally and in a piecemeal manner, but some seek more formal assistance through structured or semi-structured entrepreneurship programs. Indeed, we currently are witnessing the rise of the “support ecosystem,” which offers a plethora of entrepreneurship education and training programs. These programs vary in their design and operation; some, for example, are run by universities and colleges, some are offered by nonprofits or the government, and others are offered by for-profit entities. They might operate just a weekend in length, or last several months or years. The scope of a program’s intervention and how closely it works with each entrepreneur or startup varies widely. With this increase in the number and scope of program offerings, we wonder if adoption is outpacing evidence of their effectiveness. In this article, we examine various types of programs, with a primary focus on the accelerator, provide some context for current research and research concepts in this area, and discuss some implications of collecting data for program operators and policymakers.
Researchers have generally found that entrepreneurs are more optimistic and more confident than non-entrepreneurs. While it may help entrepreneurs persevere in the face of potential business failure, we cannot mistake their confidence for always knowing what to do with their business idea. Entrepreneurs in fact seek out mentors and other useful connections to help them succeed throughout the growth of their businesses, particularly at the start. Many entrepreneurs seek advice informally and in a piecemeal manner, but some seek more formal assistance through structured or semi-structured entrepreneurship programs. Indeed, we currently are witnessing the rise of the “support ecosystem,” which offers a plethora of entrepreneurship education and training programs. These programs vary in their design and operation; some, for example, are run by universities and colleges, some are offered by nonprofits or the government, and others are offered by for-profit entities. They might operate just a weekend in length, or last several months or years. The scope of a program’s intervention and how closely it works with each entrepreneur or startup varies widely. With this increase in the number and scope of program offerings, we wonder if adoption is outpacing evidence of their effectiveness. In this article, we examine various types of programs, with a primary focus on the accelerator, provide some context for current research and research concepts in this area, and discuss some implications of collecting data for program operators and policymakers.

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Published by: The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation on Jan 24, 2014
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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03/10/2014

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innova
t
ions
volume 8 |
issue 3/4
 A quarterly journal published by MIT Press
Accelerating Entrepreneurship
 Lead Essays
Randall Kempner Incubators Are Popping Up Like Wildflowers…Mary Walshok A Systemic Approach to Accelerating Entrepreneurship Susan Cohen What Do Accelerators Do?
Case Narratives
Sabeen Mahmud Creative KarachiFabian Pfortmüller and Nico LuchsingerThe Power of Trust Ross BairdVillage Capital’s Peer Selection ModelClara Chow and Lily Rubin Generation Enterprise Eric Glustrom An Unexpected Education EvolutionRodrigo Villar EsquivelFrom a Local Chapter to a Regional Catalyzer
 Analysis and Perspectives on Policy 
Saurabh Lall, Lily Bowles, and Ross Baird Bridging the “Pioneer Gap”Jared KonczalAccelerating into ControlMalik FalAccelerating Entrepreneurship in AfricaMarissa DrouillardMobile-Powered DevelopmentTonya SurmanBuilding Social Entrepreneurship through CoworkingMarc J. Epstein & Kristi YuthasRedefining Quality in EducationSaul Garlick Reversing the Tide of Youth Unemployment
ENTREPRENEURIAL SOLUTIONS TO GLOBAL CHALLENGES
T
ECHNOLOGY
|
G
OVERNANCE
|
G
LOBALIZATION
 
Lead Essays
3Incubators Are Popping Up Like Wildflowers…But Do They Actually Work?
Randall Kempner
7A Systemic Approach to Accelerating Entrepreneurship
Mary Walshok 
19What Do Accelerators Do? Insights from Incubators and Angels
Susan Cohen
Case Narratives
PeaceNiche and The Second Floor 
27Creative Karachi: Establishing an Arts & Culture Center for the World’s Most Rapidly Growing City 
Sabeen Mahmud
Sandbox 
43The Power of Trust: Learnings from Six Years of Building a Global Community of Young Leaders
Fabian Pfortmüller and Nico Luchsinger
Village Capital 
55Village Capitals Peer Selection Model: Empowering Entrepreneurs and Investors to Create Value Together
Ross Baird
YouthBank and Generation Enterprise
71Building Lean Startups at the Bottom of the Pyramid
Clara Chow and Lily Rubin
Watson and 
 
Educate! 
85An Unexpected Education Evolution: From Uganda to the U.S. and Beyond
Eric Glustrom
innova
t
ions
T
ECHNOLOGY
|
G
OVERNANCE
|
G
LOBALIZATION
volume 8 | issue 3/4
 
New Ventures México
93From a Local Chapter to a Regional Catalyzer
Rodrigo Villar Esquivel
Analysis
105Bridging the “Pioneer Gap”: The Role of Accelerators in Launching High-Impact Enterprises
Saurabh Lall, Lily Bowles, and Ross Baird
139Accelerating into Control
Jared Konczal
149Accelerating Entrepreneurship in Africa
Malik Fal
169Mobile Powered Development: Theory of Change andPolicy Recommendations to Drive Social Impact at the Bottom of the Pyramid
Marissa Drouillard
Perspectives on Policy 
189Building Social Entrepreneurship through the Power of Coworking
Tonya Surman
197Redefining Quality in Developing World Education
Marc J. Epstein and Kristi Yuthas
213Reversing the Tide of Youth Unemployment
Saul Garlick 
About
Innovations
Innovations
is about entrepreneurial solutions to global challenges.
The journal features cases authored by exceptional innovators; commentary andresearch from leading academics; and essays from globally recognized executives andpolitical leaders. The journal is jointly hosted at George Mason University's School of Public Policy, Harvard's Kennedy School of Government, and MIT's Legatum Centerfor Development and Entrepreneurship.

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