Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
GHS Compliance: Challenges and Solutions

GHS Compliance: Challenges and Solutions

Ratings: (0)|Views: 0 |Likes:
Compliance with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, or GHS, entails transitioning from using material safety data sheets (MSDS) to safety data sheets (SDS) and will help ensure common safety standards among all producers and users of chemicals worldwide.
Compliance with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, or GHS, entails transitioning from using material safety data sheets (MSDS) to safety data sheets (SDS) and will help ensure common safety standards among all producers and users of chemicals worldwide.

More info:

Published by: Cognizant Technology Solutions on Jan 25, 2014
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
See more
See less

01/25/2014

 
GHS Compliance: Challenges and Solutions
Identifying, collecting and communicating information on the hazards posed by chemicals remains a major issue for global companies, one
that can be more easily handled via reclassications using GHS-
 compliant labels and material safety data sheets.
Every multinational corporation faces numerous challenges when it comes to compliance with the multiplicity of laws and regulations that apply in each region or sovereign state. This is especially true with chemical companies/manufacturers, where compliance data originates in disparate systems across the enterprise.
Modications to existing regulations, or adoption
of new laws, can profoundly impact a corpora-tion’s data management system and for many companies, compliance is an organization-wide transformational initiative. One of the most daunt-ing aspects is the volume of additional chemical data companies are now required to collect, track and report in material safety data sheets (MSDS).
1
An MSDS is nothing but a document that contains information about the potential health and envi-ronmental hazards. MSDS are prepared by the supplier or manufacturer of the product and are intended to state the hazards of the product and how to use it safely.Many chemicals, no doubt, pose hazards to humans and to the environment, from initial
production through nal disposal. As a result of
globalization, chemicals are routinely used by people worldwide who speak different languages, write in different alphabets and come from dif-ferent living conditions and educational back-grounds. In some countries, a chemical may be
classied as hazardous, while in others it is not.
For decades, identifying, collecting and communicating information on the hazards posed by chemicals has been a major issue for local, national, regional and international authorities. Different jurisdictions developed distinct chemical
classication systems that had merits within their
local areas, but sometimes created confusion at wider levels. The United Nations took on the task of developing a universal method of chemical labeling and hazard warnings for the use, trans-port and disposal of chemicals. The result is the
Globally Harmonized System of Classication and
Labeling of Chemicals, or GHS.This white paper offers our perspective on GHS and
highlights the importance of reclassications to
improve safety and global compliance with chemi-cal handling and communications practices using GHS-compliant labels and safety data sheets.
cognizant 20-20 insights | december 2013
Cognizant 20-20 Insights
 
cognizant 20-20 insights
2
 More than 65 countries are in the process of adopting GHS, which offers a voluntary set of “building blocks” that each country can adopt as
it sees t.
Dening GHS
GHS is a system for harmonizing hazard
classication criteria and chemical hazard
communication elements, worldwide. More than 65 countries are in the process of adopting GHS, which offers a voluntary set of “building blocks” that each country can adopt
as it sees t. It establishes classication criteria for
physical, health and envi-ronmental hazards, along with associated hazard communication elements, notably pictograms, signal words and hazard state-ments for use on labels and on MSDS. In a nutshell, it is an international plan that
will codify the classication,
labeling and communica-tion of chemical hazards across the board. In the
GHS context, harmonized means standardized. For example, this means consumers in country A
will have access to and hopefully understand the same information about chemicals and products as those in Country B. The ultimate goal of GHS is to avoid confusion and to inform safety.
Connecting GHS and HCS
The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 established the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)
2
 within the U.S. Depart-ment of Labor. The original act included language to the effect that employees should be apprised
of all hazards to which they are exposed on the
 job. In the early 1980s, OSHA implemented this instruction by enacting the Hazard Communi-cation Standard (HCS) as 29 CFR
3
 1910.1200. HCS became effective in 1986. A fundamental premise of HCS is that employees who may be
exposed to hazardous chemicals in the workplace
have a right to know about the hazards and how to protect themselves. For this reason, HCS is sometimes referred to as the “worker right-to-know legislation,” or more often just as the “right-to-know law.” Although the original HCS applied only to the manufacturing industry, subsequent court
challenges have modied the scope of the law so
that today HCS applies to nearly all sectors of the workforce. HCS is now aligned with GHS. This will pro-vide a common and coherent approach to clas-sifying chemicals and communicating hazard information on labels and safety data sheets. Once implemented, the revised standard will improve the quality and consistency of hazard information in the workplace, making it safer by providing workers with easily understandable information on appropriate handling and safe use of hazardous chemicals. This update will also help reduce trade barriers and result in produc-tivity improvements for businesses that regu-larly handle, store and use hazardous chemicals while providing cost savings for businesses that periodically update safety data sheets and labels for chemicals covered under HCS. GHS classi-
cation and communication elements are the
program’s foundational elements, which ensure the safe use of chemicals (as depicted in Figure 1).
The Chemical Safety Communications Continuum
Figure 1Risk Management and Safe Use of ChemicalsHazard CommunicationSDS and LabelsGHS Classifications
 
cognizant 20-20 insights
3
GHS Impacts: Updates for Existing SDS and Labels
GHS adoption affects nearly every player in the chemical lifecycle, with special responsibilities for chemical manufacturers and employers who han-dle, use and store hazardous materials. Chemical manufacturers must reclassify their chemicals
using GHS standardized classication criteria as
well as produce GHS-compliant labels and safety data sheets (SDS). GHS includes two key elements:
 
Harmonized criteria for classifying sub-stances and mixtures
 according to their health, environmental and physical hazards.
 
Harmonized hazard communication ele-ments,
including requirements for labeling and SDS.
As corporations expand globally, creating com
-pliant documents that meet multiple regulatory agency requirements is more of a challenge. In fact, GHS requires companies world-wide to change their SDS and labels to provide the appropriate signal words, pictograms and hazard and precautionary statements to convey the hazards to users (see Figure 2). The GHS stan-
dard denition for labeling is
as follows: “Label means an appropriate group of written, printed or graphic informa-tion elements concerning a hazardous product, selected as relevant to the target
sector(s), that is afxed to,
printed on or attached to
GHS requires companies worldwide to change their SDS and labels to provide the appropriate signal words, pictograms and hazard and precautionary statements to convey the hazards to users.
Sample GHS SDS Pictograms
Figure 2
Environment Flame Health Hazard
MSDS vs. SDS
Figure 3
MSDS Sections
1. Product and company ID2. Hazards identification3. Ingredients information4. First aid measures5. Fire fighting measures6. Accidental release measures7. Handling and storage8. Physical and chemical properties9. Exposure and personal protection10. Stability and reactivity11. Toxicological information12. Other information1. Product and company ID2. Hazards identification3. Ingredients information4. First aid measures5. Fire fighting measures6. Accidental release measures7. Handling and storage8. Physical and chemical properties9. Exposure and personal protection10. Stability and reactivity11. Toxicological information12. Ecological information13. Disposal considerations14. Transportation information15. Regulatory information16. Other information
SDS Sections

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->