Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
24Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
-CHESS- 22 Lessons in Endgame Strategy by Jan Van Reek

-CHESS- 22 Lessons in Endgame Strategy by Jan Van Reek

Ratings: (0)|Views: 987 |Likes:
Published by elvuelodelcondor
When a practical endgame is played, it is often useful to develop a strategic plan.
This matter is very similar for the ending and middle game. If the white and black
pieces oppose each other in two lines, a strategic plan can be devised.
The endgame is just ‘a matter of technique’ in two cases:
1. If one player has a large material advantage, a plan is hardly needed.
2. If the number of pieces is low, strategic planning cannot be made due to the
absence of lines.
When a practical endgame is played, it is often useful to develop a strategic plan.
This matter is very similar for the ending and middle game. If the white and black
pieces oppose each other in two lines, a strategic plan can be devised.
The endgame is just ‘a matter of technique’ in two cases:
1. If one player has a large material advantage, a plan is hardly needed.
2. If the number of pieces is low, strategic planning cannot be made due to the
absence of lines.

More info:

Published by: elvuelodelcondor on Sep 26, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/20/2013

pdf

text

original

 
TTTT
CHESS ZONE
TTTT
1
22 lessons in endgame strategy  By Jan van Reek  
 When a practical endgame is played, it is often useful to develop a strategic plan.This matter is very similar for the ending and middle game. If the white and blackpieces oppose each other in two lines, a strategic plan can be devised.The endgame is just
a matter of technique
in two cases:1. If one player has a large material advantage, a plan is hardly needed.2. If the number of pieces is low, strategic planning cannot be made due to theabsence of lines. These theoretical endings are treated in books by Averbakh andChéron. When a strategy has to be designed, two approaches are possible: struggle andprophylaxis. Different plans are treated in the lessons. They have been published inthe Dutch
SchaakMagazine 
from 2000 until 2006. The English translations areshortened versions of the articles.
Struggle: 
 1. Attack in the centre.2. The attack on the king.3. The flank attack.4. Encirclement.
Prophylaxis: 
 5. Blockade in general.6. Blockade by the knight.7. Restriction in general.8. Restriction and time.9. Consolidation.10. Fortification.11. Strong and weak squares.12. Crossing a diagonal.13. The battle for an important square.14. Overprotection.15. Counterattack: direct confrontation.16. Counterattack: the flight forwards.
Pocket strategies: 
 17. Breakthrough by pawns.18. Breakthrough by pieces.19. The positional manoeuvre.20. Zugzwang.21. Positional sacrifice: win.22. Positional sacrifice: draw.
 
TTTT
CHESS ZONE
TTTT
2
(1) Beliavsky,Alexander - Spassky,Boris
Soviet ch Moscow, 1973
[JvR] 
Lesson 1: An attack in the centre. Strategy in the endgame can be simple. I consider a usual situation. One player seeks the struggle by moving the pieces forwards andanother person reacts to the attack. Such uncomplicated strategies of struggle willbe treated in several lessons. Difficult strategies will be discussed later. An attack inthe centre is a very simple strategy. The successful advance of centre pawns hasbeen shown by Philidor. This example is more recent. Black has a broad pawncentre. He can start a direct attack, if he advances the pawns properly and uses thepieces for support.
18...e5 19.¤b3 ¤xb3+ 20.axb3 ¥e6 21.¥e2 0–0 22.¦hf1 a5 23.¥b5
Thebishop prevents ..a4.
23...¦ac8 24.¥d3 ¦c6 25.¥f5
[Kotov prefers 25.¢d2 inorder to play Ra1. However, Black can play ..e4 and ..d4 in that case.]
25...¥xf526.¦xf5 ¦fc8! 27.¦d2 d4
Black threatens..d3.
28.¢d1?!
[Slightly better is28.¢b1!? although this move gives less protection to an advance in the centre.]
28...¦b8!
The threat ..a4 decides the game.
29.g4 h6 30.¦df2 ¦bb6 31.¢d2 a4!32.bxa4 ¦xb2 33.¢d3 ¢g7 34.¦xe5!?
 A sacrifice brings the last chance.
34...fxe5 35.¥xe7 ¦c3+ 36.¢e4 d3?
[36...¦e3+ 37.¢d5 d3 38.¢e6 dxc2 Black wins, because White has no drawing mechanism.]
37.¥f6+?
[Coincidencescontribute to the great escape 37.¥d6! ¢g6!
(37...dxc2 38.¥xe5+) 
38.¦f6+!! ¢xf639.¥xe5+ ¢g5 40.¥xc3 ¦xc2 41.¢xd3 ¦xh2 42.a5 ¢xg4 White narrowly draws.43.¢c4 h5 44.a6 h4 45.¢b5 ¦e2 46.a7 ¦e8 47.¢c6 h3 48.¥e5! Spassky didn't knowthis combination. "You were lucky" I teased him. He nodded with a smile.]
37...¢g8 38.¥xe5 ¦b4+ 39.¢d5 ¦xc2 40.¦f1 d2 41.¦d1 ¦xg4 42.a5 ¦a443.a6! ¢h7
[43...¦xa6? 44.¥f4! ¦aa2 45.¥xh6 (Kotov).]
44.¥b8 ¦a1! 45.a7 ¦xd146.a8£ ¦e1
Black's strategy in the centre has led to a complete success.
0–1
 
TTTT
CHESS ZONE
TTTT
3
(2) Anand,Viswanathan - Kasparov,Gary 
Linares (10), 1999
[JvR] 
Lesson two: The attack on the king. The final aim of the attacker is to mate theopponent. Nevertheless a mating attack rarely occurs in the practical endgame,because an experienced player will resign before it can happen. The attack on theking with few pieces often is a part of the basic theory. An interesting direct attackon the king occurred in Linares 1999.
36...¤e4?
[Correct is 36...¤d7! 37.¤b2 ¤b6 Kasparov's analysis continues with38.c4 ¥xc4! 39.¤xc4 ¤xc4+ 40.¢b3 ¤e5! 41.¢a4 ¤c6]
37.¤b2!
The defense of thec-pawns has little importance.
37...¤xc3 38.¤d3+ ¢e3 39.¤c5 ¥f5 40.¢b2!
 A potential defender of the a-pawn is chased away.
40...¤d5
 A protection by theking loses matter.
41.¤b7 a4 42.c4! ¤b6 43.¤d6 ¥d3 44.c5! ¤d5 45.¢a3¥c2 46.¤b5! ¤e7
The knight has to stop the c-pawn.
47.¤a7?
[Anand couldhave crowned his wonderful defense with 47.¤c3! ¢d4 48.¤xa4 ¢c4 49.¤b6+¢xc5 50.¤d7+]
47...¢d4 48.c6 ¤d5 49.¤b5+
[My preference goes to 49.¢b2!¥f5 50.¤b5+ ¢c5 51.¤c3 ¤b6 52.¢a3 Black wins by 52...¤c4+! 53.¢a2
(53.¢xa4 ¥c2#) 
53...¥e6! 54.¤xa4+ ¢b4 55.¤b2 ¤d2+ 56.¢a1 ¢a3 57.c7 ¤b3+ 58.¢b1 ¥f5+59.¤d3 ¥xd3#]
49...¢c5 50.c7 ¥f5!
[50...¥f5! 51.¢xa4
(51.¤a7 ¤xc7 52.¢xa4 ¢b6) 
51...¤b6+ 52.¢a5 ¤c4+ 53.¢a4 ¥c2#]
0–1
 

Activity (24)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
airal liked this
arpielerma liked this
jhrovii3598 liked this
extemporaneous liked this
arpielerma liked this
arpielerma liked this
mahafatna9982 liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->