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Paris TX Airport Drive In

Paris TX Airport Drive In

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Published by rivest266
Paris,TX Airport DI opening
Paris,TX Airport DI opening

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Published by: rivest266 on Sep 28, 2009
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AIRPORT
DRIVE-INSECTION
AIRPORT
DRIVE-INSECTION
SECTION
TWO
fARJS,
TEXAS,
THURSDAY AFTERNOON,
JULY
13,
1950
r*%»vij,
i
KAAj, inwnauAi
AT
i
cKrtuvn,
JUL.I
Id,
1S50
EIGHT PACTS
Interstate
to
Open
New
Airport
Drive-InTheatre
Tonight
GALA OPENING
'Renegades
.Drama
of
West
to
Show
At
Airport
Drive-In Theatre
Tonight
The Airport Drive-In
Theatre,
one of the most luxurious andmost
modern
drive-in
theatres
inthis
area,
opens tonight with
the
presentation of
"Renegades,"
aitirring
story
of the West.Special favors will be given toall
children
attending
the
premiere
show tonight.
The
opening
pictureis
filmed
in
beautiful
technicolor by
Columbia
Studios.
Stars
in the
film
are Willard
Parker
as the
town
doctor.
Eve-
'RENEGADES'STAR—BeautifulEvelyn
Keyei his the
feminine
leadin'Renegades',
technicolor
film
of the
West,
which officially
opens the
beautiful
new
Airport
Drive-In Theatre,
offHighway271
east
of
Paris.
Sound
Expert
Says
Airport
Drive-In
System
Is
Tip-Top
James
C. Skinner,
chief
of the
Interstate
sound
and
projection
en-gineering
department, gave
the
new Airport
Drive-In
sound
equip-
ment
a
final
check
Monday
and
pronounced
it
in
top shape.
Skinner,
a
frequent
visitor
to
Paris started
in
show
business in
1927,
and
although
still
a youngman he is an old timer in the
field
of
electronics.Immediately
after
his schooling
he
joined
Radio
Central
Company
in
Houston.
From
this
post
went
to the public
'school
system
ofHouston, where
he
taught
radioand electronics
withtwo
years
as
summer
Instructor
in thesame
subjects at the
University
of
Texas.
Since
his
advent
• n
Interstate
circles,he hasbeenin
charge
of
ail
sound engineering.
He is
also
an
expert
ontelevision.He
operat-
edone of thefirst
experimental
sets and stations in Texas for In-
terstate.
Valley
Shows
Supervisor
To
Attend
Gala Opening
Raymond Willie,
supervisor
ofthe Valley
Theatres
for a numberof
yearsprior
to his present as-
signment
as
Assistant
to theGene-
ral
Manager, is expected to bepresent
Wednesday
evening
aft the
opening
of the new
Airport
Drive-
In
Theatre.
By theatrical business
standards,
Willie
is an old timer
havingstarted in
showbusiness
in Ft.
Worth
as a
doorman
at the Hippo-drome Theatre
in 1916. Except for
a
period
of
few
years,
Willie
has'
been withMr.Hoblitzelleand
In-
terstate Theatres
continuouslysince Joining the organization
tn
1918.
Since 1937 when he was trans-ferred
from
San
Antonio,
where hewas in charge of all
Interstate
Theatres in that city, his
responsi-bilities have been largely
centered
in the
operation
oftheatre^inHouston,
Ft.
Worth,
San
Antonio,
Austin, Galveston,
and in
Dallas,
Home
Office
location of
Interstate
Circuit.
With extensive
experience in
th«
construction
of
theatres,
having
ap-
proved plans and specifications,
decorative
treatment
and
equip-
ping of more
than
thirty
new
theatres
built
for
Interstate
in
,tht
past
twelve years, Willie'sopinionis
highly
respected
by
theatre
architects and builders.
Constantly in
search
of new ar.dimproved ideas
for
theatre
con-
struction, Willie's
visitto
Paris,
aside
from attending
theopening
festivities, is to
observe
the many
modern
innovations
in the
newest
of
the Interstate group of
theatres.
RAYMOND
WILLIE
!yn
Keyes as the beautiful daugh-ter of one of the successful busi-
nessmen of the
town
and
LarryParks
as an
outlaw
trying to go
straight.
Actually the movie
portrays
thestory of the famed Dembrow gang,
of
which the
reforming
outlaw is a
member.
Complications
start
when
Parks'
fatherand his
brothers
refusetoletthe sonquitthegangandforcehim
back into
a life of
crime.
Eventually
the
entire
gang, in-
cluding
Parks,
meet
death after asensational
screen
*
gun
battle.
Romance
centers-around the
doctorandMiss
Keyes,
whq
sur-
vivethe
terrors
of thegang war-fare
to
give
a happy ending to
the feature.Two
cartoons
also
are
sched-uled
every
night
at the Airport
Drive-In, accordingtoManagerCecil
Burch.
Thedouble cartoonhas
been
arranged for the
benefit
of
the
youngsters
attending (he
show.
New
Theatre
HereReveals
Skill
of
Sub-Contractors
Interstate Theatres' newest
and
one of its
modern
drive-in
thea-
tres
— The
Airport
Drive
- In
Theatre east of
Paris
off Highway271,
stands as
evidence
of the
skill
of
anumberof
local
concerns
in
precise
buildingandcontracting.Hundreds ofenthusiasticmovie-
goers
are expected to
se«
the
many features
of the
threatr*
atits
gala opening tonight.
General contractor for the
thea-
tre was J. R.
Spencer
Company
of
Fort
Worth.
Sub-contractors
include Hamp
Malcne.
electrical
construction
:
W.
H.
Turner
Engineering Co.,plumbing;
Skeenand
Kelso, Sak-
rete
building
blocks;
Clyde
Par-
ham,
carpenter
work; Joe Hatcher,
concretework;
Moser.
Construction
Company,
furnishing
gravel; Oyler
Sign
Co..
sign work; Stalling?Nursery
Co.,
shrubbery
and grass
for
the
playground; Gibson
Hard-ware
Co., well pump equipmentand
J.
.
F.
Zimmerman
and
Sons
of
Dallas, the
attraction board.
In the spacious and
modern
snack bar Duncan's Admiration
Coffee.
Honey Krust
Bakery
rollsand bakery products ,and Camp-
bell's
jce
cream will
be
served.
Opening
ofAirportDrive-In
Climaxes
4 Months of Work
J.HARVEY
ELDER
Openingof the newAirport
Drive-In
.tonight will
climax
four
months
of
work
for J.
Harvey
El-
der,
above, construction
depart-
ment
supervisor.
After 25
years
inthe highly specialized profession oftheatre
construction.
Elder
says
the
thrill
of
seeing
a
premiere
opening of a new
theatre
is as
great as
ever.Elder
has super-
vised
theatre
construction practi-cally
all
over
the
United
Statesand is as
familiar with
theattend-
ant
worry
of the
stress
of
twelve
feet
ofsnowon abuildingas to
what
happens
to a roof
when
the
sun
shines twelve months a
year.
According
to
Elder,
the new
Air-
port
Drive-In
represents
the
finestin
modern
theatre
architecture anddesign.
Feature Buyer
forInterstate
Former
Sports
Events
Star
After
aspellas a
racing
car
driverand
activity
in other
iport-
ng events,
Porter
K. Johnston,
known
as PK,
stepped
into
the
Him
business. Currently Johnston
headsthe
buying'
of features for the In-
terstatecircuit.Johnston
has
been
inshow busi-
nesssince
1914.
His
start
wax as
r
i
,
fn
New
E
"Bland
and
he Middle
West.
He
was a pioneer
in
a then new business, moving
pictures.
ji
P
.
r
i°r
to
inln
K Interstate
he
was
district sale*
manager
for Fox
Films
in the
Southwest.
acted
In
that
capacity
for
eight
y«an.
Johnston pioneered th«
Interstate
polcyofbalanced
programs
of en-tertainment, the
blending
of
ipecial
short subjects to
iurround
U
fea-
ture
attraction.
Karl
Hoblitzelle
s
Work
Builds
Success
of
Movies
in Southwest
New
Airport
Drive-In HasLatest Type
Construction
A
f*/*m>rt
t»
*•
+«
f+
11
r
*r
•»_.
*•»
.
According to C. W.
Moss,
city
manager
of
the Paris InierstnloTheatres, the new
Airport
Drive-
In
Theatreenbodles
the
latest
indrive-in
theatre construction.
The
Paris
Airport Drive-In
Is
the
fifth
such theatre
to bo
built
and
operated
by
Interstate Theatres
and in
design
and
convenience
for
the patron
it
is the
best.
Mr.Mosiwho
recently
made atriptoAbilene where Interstate
has
just opened
Us
fourth unit
stiy
that
quite
a few
changes
and im-
provements
have
been made in the1'aris
installation.
The
piitio
is nearly twice the
siv.L-
of
mast modern drive
-
ins
nnd this
lias
been done because
the patio as
built
by
Interstate
Theatres is the
focale
or
meetingplaceforfriendsandneighbors.
The tables and
chairs
available on
tiie patio
for the
patron
are
sosituated
that
one can view
the
screen
and
hear
the
picture while
visiting with
friends.
Other
drive-in
theatres
Operated
byInterstateare
in
Albuquerque,
Abilene
and
Tyler.
Cecil
Burch
Rises
From
Usher to Manager
Here
Forty-five
years
ago,Karl Hob-litzelle,
president
of
the" Interstate
Theatres
of
Texas,
was busy atwork at his desk in the
office
ofthe
Director
of the fabulous
World's
Fair
at St.
Louis when
a
delegation of the showmen from
the
Fair's
colorful Midway
called
upon
him.
"A
tremendous opportunity
ex-
ists
in Texas
and
the
southwest[or a
circuit
of vaudeville thea-
tres",
they
told
the
young man.
"No
adequate
public
entertainment
has yet been provided for the
peo-
ple of
this
great
area.
We havewatched
you
handle
the affairs of
:he Exposition and we believe
that
you
are the man to help us or-
ganizeanamusement company
which
will operate for the
first
time high-class
vaudeville houses
in the
major
cities
of Texas and
adjoining
states."
OPPORTUNITY
SPOTTED
The son of
Clarence Linden
Hob-litzelle
a
Confederate prisoner
of
war during the struggle betweenthe states, recognized opportunitywhen
it made
one of Its
rare
ap-pearances.
Furthermore, he had
the
initiativeand thecouragetoseizeit. Enlising thefinancial sup-
[>ort
of his
brother, George
K.
Hob-
litzelle,
he
raised
a major portion
of
the capital of the first Inter-
state
Amusement Company, thepioneer of show
business
in Texas.Atthe first meeting of the board
of.
directors
of the new
Company,
Karl
HobHtzelle
was elected
sec-
retary.
A
year
laterhe waselectedpresident.
' A career
which
was to
culminate
in
his
recognition
as one
the'
[reatest
exhibitors
of
motion pic-:ures and stage attractions in theUnited
States
had
sucessfully
cleared the
many
eariy
obstacles
of
a most hazardous enterprise.
Karl
Hoblitzelle had faith in theSouthwest and in wholesome pub-ic entertainment. For forty
years
>e
teamed
business acumen
and
lighstandardsin thedevelopment
of
show business in the Southwest.
When
hefinishedhisworkat the
Exposition
Grounds
in
August.
1905,
however, he discovered that
:he financial
condition
of the newcompany,
was so unfavorable thatt required his Immediate atten-
tion.
Bycompany resolutionit wasordered that "all of the
theatres
onour
ciinuit
be placed
under
the di-rect
and
entire management
of
Messrs, R. E.
Rlcksen, Vice-Presi-dent, and Karl
Hoblitzelle.
Sec-
retary,
jointly,
and
thp.t
they be
held
responsible
for the
conduct
and
policy
of the
same."
From
the day
that
he assumed
the
presidency
of
Interstate
Amusement
Company,
Hoblitzelle's
career parallels the
expansion
and
adjustmentto
changing conditions
of
his
organization.
He once
wrote
to his
board
of
directors
of the
problems and
difficulties
of "a
company
struggling
and
fighting
for Its
existence
in a new
field."
Hoblitzelle
and
his companywere forced
to
fight
for
survival
in
their pioneerendeavors to es-
tablish
high-cUss vaudeville enter-tainment
in
Dallas, Houston, Ft.
Worth and San Antonio, in the
early days, as
well
as in manyother cities and towns of Texas and
adjoining
states.
The present Ma-
jestic
Theatres
of the
four
leadingcities of Texas are monuments to
their
preseverance and far-sighted-
ness.
ACTS
AS PIONEERWith
the
advent
of
important fea-ture
films,
astheyareknown
to-
day, Karl Hoblitzelle pioneeredwith combined vaudeville and mo-
tion
picture
programs
in his thea-
tres,
making a success of them
with
a summer policy in 1922. Air-
conditioning
was introduced in theMajestic Theatres of the
Interstate
Amusement
Company about
thistime,
the heat having previously
necessitated the
closing
of
thea
tres
in Texasduringthe summermonths.The
Interstate
AmusementCompany, under
the
leadership
of
Hobiitzelle, pioneered in air-condi-tioning of
theatres
inthe South-
west
andleadthecountryin
this
development.
After 24
years
of
uninterruptedactivity in show
business from
the
lime he became president of In-
ttntat*
AmuMment Company In
KARL
HOBLITZELLE
1906,
Hoblitzelle
decided to
retire
fromthe
threatrc business
In
1930and disposed of the
assets
in thea-
tres
and
leases
of Interstate to the
great
national RKO
exhinitlon
cir-
cuit.
His determination to
give
up his
life's
workwasshortlived.A na-
tion's
economy was to bring himback into show business in an
even
more important
role
of exhibitor.As
&,
result
of the depression pre-
cipitated
by thestock market
crash
of 1929, RKP,
Interstate's
purchaser, and Paramount Pic-
tures
Corporation both went intobankruptcy receivership on thesame
day in
January. 1922. Hob-
litzelle
was
requested
to
take
over
the
Texas
properties
of
both
of
these corporations
and to
res'/irethemto asound
financial
con-
dition.
By 1035 !be receiverships hadbeen dismissed and the new In-terstate organization was in fu!loperation with Karl
Hoblitzelle
more
active than ever as Presi-
dent
of Interstate Circuit, Inc..
and
one of the top
exhibitors
in the
nation.Within
forty years in Texas, thetheatre and motion picture showhave risen from
public
resorts
of
questionable repute to the status
of
civic
centers,
the
very
hub of
social
and
economic
life
in thecommunity.The
principal
reasonis the
stress
placed by Hoblitzelle
onclean,
family
entertainment.
His
shows
had to besuitablefor
the women or
children,
whether
vaudeville
or motion pictures. Fur-thermore,
in
keeping with
the
slo-
gan
of
Interstate.
"Dedicated to
Community
Service",
his
theatresand their staffs must exhibit a
sense
of
civic
responsibility.
CIVIC
ROLESEvery worthy
cause
has
the
sun-port of the Interstate resources
and
personnel.Finally, the President of the In-terstate '
organization
attributesthe
success
of his entire programto the teamwork and spirit of hiscompanypersonnel,Karl Hoblitzelle. however,has
been as
active
In the civic,
social,
and
economic
life
of his times
as
he has
been
in
show business.
Hisown
adopted State of
Texas
has
recognized
his contributions to thedevelopment of the State by suc-cessive honors, such
as
member
ship on the
State
Commission for
Texas
Centennial Celebration;
Acting Chali.Tjan.
New
York
andSanFrancisco World's Fair- Com-mission
of
Texas;
and
Chairman
of
The
Texas Centennial
Commis-sionto
celebrate
the
100th
An-
niversary
of the
Stateshood
of Tex
•«
in
1945. Hoblitzcllc'i
contribulion
In this
latter
capacity
illus-
trates
the range of his interests
and his farsightedness.
He
inaugurated
a one hundredyear plan
to
revitalize
rural
lile
of
Texas,
to rebuild the land, andto
assure
the
future
prosperity
ofthe
State
through
dtvelopment
otIts
great
agricultural
resources.
Hoblitzelle
has
advocated
thecreation
of a
Texas
Rural
Develop-ment Commissionby the
State
Legislature
lo
assist
farmer*through
rural
community
plan-
ning, and to
implement
the
work
of
such
a
comrrfission,
he
has
founded
and
helped
finance
the
Texas
Stale Research Foundation,
with a
gift
of
$25,000,000 from
the
Esther T.
Hoblttzclle
Trust Fund
set up
after
the
death
of his
wife
on
July
28.
19-13
During the
first
World War he
went to
Washington
and aided the
AmericanRed
Cross
inprovidinga
program
of
entertainment
forpatients of
the Army
and
Navyhospitals
of the
country.
He
planwas so successful that it is in op-eration today
on
substantially
the
same
outlines.
As a
result,
he was
planed in
charge
of all Red
Cross
entertainment activities, not
only
in
hospitals,
but in the hospital
zones throughout
the United
Statesentertaining and rehabilitatingsoldiers.
Ho
remained
in
Wash-
ington approximatelya
year
and a
half,
serving
his
country
in theposition
for which he was
ideallysuited.The
advent
ofWorldWar IIfound Hoblitzelle
actively
advocat-
ing
preparedness and
nil-out
war
effort
in
defense
of dcmnciacy andfreedom.
His
contributions
to vic-tory
over the
dictator
countries
won himfour
awards
and
citation.
Interstate
Drive-InsSupervisor
Here forAirport
Show
Opening
Pat Hudglns, supervisor of
Inter-state
Theatres
Drive-ins
is
here
to
assist
in the
opening
of the newAirport Drive-in
Theatre
located
on the Airport
Road.
The
Airport
is the
fifth
Drive-Into
be
opened
by Interstate
in
thelast
two
years
and far
surpasse
In
beauty and patron convenience
any ofthe
other units,
which are
located at Tyler, Abilene and Al-buquerque.
New
Mexico.
Hudglns
has had a varied experi-ence in show
business
and has for
thelast15
years been
connectedwith
Interstate Theatres
In
several
West
Texas towns as well ag Dal-
li:,
Tyler
and
Denison.From
usher to theatre managertells the
story
of Cecil
Burch.
manager
of
the Airport Drive-InTheatre,
Paris'
newest theatre
which
isopening tonight.
Mr.
Burch,
a native nf
Cavincss
in
Lamar
County, has
boon
in
the
"
theatre
business 38
ytars,
all of
which
were
spent
in
Paris.
He
started
as an
usher
andclimbedto
the
post
of
assistant Paris mana-
Ber
for the
Interstate Theatres tn
12*1.
lie
has
held
that
positionsince,
except
for
22
months servlco
n
the
Army during
tho
war.
He
also has written ads for
(he
Inter-
state
theatres
here.
Mr. Burch
is
a graduate of
Paris
High
School and Commercial Col-ege.
He
Is
a
member
of/the Meth-
*
odlst Church. He, his
wife
and
?
daughter
live
at
100-24th
S. E.
CECIL
BURCH
Interstate
s
Manager
Starts Out as
Usher
The operation and booking of at-tractions, for
more
than one hun-dred
and'thirty
theatres is a
man-sized
Jq^-_
The
nian
who tides it
for
Inter-
stateCircuit is
hailed
bymotionpicture
producers
asExhibitorNumber One.
He's
the
sort
of a
fellow
who cnn handle a
man's
job In the
theatre
In the
sports
.vorld and in charitable
endeavor.The man Is R. J.
O'Donncll
vice
^resident and
generalmannger
of
Interstate.
His Job
keeps
him
fly-
ngfrom
coast
to coast setting at-
iractlonson
nil
the
activities
of
Us
organization.He has a
constant
lingeron
the pulse
of the
,theatre-
?oing
public
and Is
recognized
as
:he
best
guagerofaudience likes
and dislikes in the business.
Like most
other
successful
show-menO'Donnellstarted
in thetheatre
as an usher. He was thir-
teen
then and the
theatre
was the
Chicago
Opera House. It was aparttlme
jobwhilehe attended
school.
Still in his
first
year
in
showbusiness he moved to
the Iriquois
Theatre and
thereby
develops apeculiar
coincidence.
Bob was anusher
when
thetheatre was so dis-astrously destroyed
by
fire.
O'Donnell is one of the
baseballsmost ardent
fans.
As
vice presi-
dentof theDallasRebels he is
active in
Texas
League
mailers
and can be
found
in his box behind
home plate at all the team's homegames.Back to
the
theatre again we
find
O'Donncll
back
at the
ChicagoOpera House where
he had a
rapidrise from usher
through
variouspromotions to assistant manager.
But already young Mr.
O'Donnell
was
casting hiseyesto greener
fields
and in
1911
hu
secured
theposition of
assistant treasurer
ofthe Orphcum
Theatre
in
Brooklyn
Good
treasurerswere hard to
find
and
In
1912
he
became trea-
surer
for The
Shubcrt
Theatrethe
44th
Street Theatre
and several
other
T.'frw
YorkHouses.
Then came
his
first
venture
in
show business
on
his
own.
With
the
savings
nf
two
years
pooled
with
the savings
o(
a
friend
heboughtanopen-air
theatre
inNew-burg
N. Y.
The
natives were notimpressed and
provedIt
by
stay-
ing
away in
record..breaking
num-
bers.
The O'Donneli bank
roil
wasso short it became the duty "ofBob
his
partner
and old baseball
friend
and an assistant to form a
quartet
to
provide
for
the patrons
entertainment.
Mr.
O'Donnel] fallto
recall
whetherhe was a
bari-
tone tenor or, basso but he
remem-bers
vividly
that he soon
found
himself
waiting for a train withhis fortune reduced to one dollar
and
hispersonal
belongings
statedattheonesuithe had on.Back In New York he
went
towork as
treasurer
of the Royal
Theatre.
For the1914-1915 seasonhe returned to the Brooklyn Or-
pheum
as treasurer and duringthe 1916-1917 he was promoted to
assistant
manager and treasurer.
H was
during
this
period
of
1917-1919that he became
more
closely
acquainted
with
CharlieFreeman,
now
talent
booker
for
Interstate with whom there hadbeen a warm friendship for
years.
So itwus
that
in
1924 Freeman
in-troduced BobO'Donnellto
Karl
Hoblitzelle
from
Dallas,
TJX-JS
Immediatelyhe was
offered
a job
with
the Hoblitezclle
theatres
in
Texas,So Bob O'Donnell came to Texas
as
manngpr
of the
Mnjeslic
Thea-trein
Fort
Worth.
Then
In
1925he was appointed General Operat-
ing
Manager
for theMajestic
Thea-
tres
In
Dallas.
San
Antonio,
Hous-
ton
and
Fort
Worth.Today
BobO'DonnollIs a
con-
firmed
Texan
nnd
Texans claim
him as one of
their own.
His
char-ity
activities
are
well
known all
over
Texas and
throughout
the
land.
He
was active in the
organ-
ization
of a
Texas Tent
of
TheVariety
Clubs
a
.showmnn
organ-
ization
devoted entirely
to charity
work. Through the years he spread
thn
charilable
work
ofthe
Texas
Variety
club
throughout
the
State.Today
he is
National
Chief
Barker
(president) of Variety and the
pace he set for the Texas
club
isbeing
quickened
under
his
guid-ance
in his nationel
role.
R.
J.
O'DONNELL
 
t—.
THE
PARIS
NEWS, THURSDAY, JULY
13,
1950
^Yilliom
O'Conneil
Known
:As
Hop,Skip,
Jump
Man
-.-"Brownsvttla today.
.
.Amarillo
tc~~«}<>rrow.
.
.with
Wichita
Fails
and
,
Vernon
tossed
in as
sidetrips.
-
-That's
William
F.
O'Domiell,
the
'ftop.
skip
and
jump
executive.
IBill,as
he's
known
to
most
of-'the
folks
hereand elsewhere,
Is
in•charge
of
theatre
operations
for
~-4he
Interstate Circuit.
His duties
-carry
him
from
the
Valley
to El
~
Paso,
and from
East Texas
to
AN
"b'ufluerque,and the
Panhandle
-
tossed
in to
make
histraveling
^area
ono of
extremes.
Because
of
*
;
th> vaslness
of his territory he
- employs all
modes
of
transporta-
tion.
He
flics,
drives
his car and^sometimes
winds
up
in
a
railroad,*«e*t
or
berth
— and on one trip
"h*satatop his
suitcase
from
^Austin
to
Dallas.»'. Bill started
hi«
theatrical
career
-
In
19W
when he
left'
his native
CJil-
*'C4jgo
for New York to become as-
.. sistant to his
astute brother,
R. J.
••'now Vice
-
President
and
General
'Manager
of Interstate. The
next
I
decade
or
so
found
him
one of
**
Broadway's most popular and
''energetic
treasurers
and
mating-
lJe'r».
He
handled
the
seat sales
on
•.'VariousBroadway
hltan
polo
"matches,
baseball
and
boxing
^Championships.
.„..iHls
next stop
WHS
Texas, where
-
managed theatres
in San
An-
*'Mhlo
and became
City
Manager
«Iar
the
circuit there.-•••Thence
he
went
to Dallas to
takt
over the duties he now
performs,
Golf
and charitable
duties
are
bis hobbies
and
he's
active
In
both.Asa
trustee
of
the
Variety'foundationof
Texas,
ho isactive
In the
operation
ot
that
organiza-
tion's
famous
Boys'
Ranch
at
Bed-ford.
These
duties
take
up
what-
ever
hen
time
he has
from
the
theatres.Inaddition to
his
activi-
ties
on the Ranch board, ho is a
director of the
Dallastent,
and *
former Chief Barkerof that
organi-
zation. As a national
canvasman
and international
representative
he
Isprominent
InaffairsofVa-
riety international. The
Variety
Clubs
are
organizations
of theatri-
cal
folk
Interested in charities. He
fs
also on the Board of the
Free-
man Memorial Clinic. Dallas, inwhich
the
Dallas Club
sponsors the
surgical
wardm
The
Turtle
Derby, an annual
fall
frolic
in
Dallas
and now rated as
one of the
nation's
greatest
one
day sports program, is another of
his
pet
charity
projects, and
it
owes most
of
It's
success
to Bill.
Proceeds
from
thisgiganticshow
are the
funds
thatkeep
the Boys'
Ranch
In
full
operation.
BID
has beenactive
In
the
erec-
tion
and equipping of the new
air-
port, and he
of
courseIshereto
assist
in
It'sdedication to the citi-zens of
Paris,
but the
next
day,
as
likely'as
not, will find
him
Albuquerqueor Tyler.
WILLIAM
O'DONNELL
V
H
•••*
John
Lund
Estimates
Other
Stars'
Acting
By
GENE
HANDSAKER
;•'
.HOLLYWOOD
What
fine
does
one
star
tee
In
anoth-
*'*r'»
acting? John Lund gives
«"'•fcw
estimates:
*»—""DickWldmark's forteIs the
*'high-tension
thing. H« manages to
,,le't
himself
go and yet
hold himself
-In
check.
Rsy
Mllland's
a
good
*
comedian
but Is at
his
best
In
I'isQmethlng sinister,a
little
neurot-
••'io
and
offbeat.
Bob Preston uses
^
his
eyes —
keeps
'em
alive,
catch-
w
>ji the
lightwith them. The
rest
of
-•his
face
may be in
complete
re-
pose.
~
;;,"Spencer
Tracy has atrickof
^making
an
entrance? with
his
~-«yes."
Lund demonstrated:
head
"
down, then
up
suddenly
and
looking
;
Straight
ahead.
"Then
hestarts
.-'
talking,"
Johncontinued.
"Greg-- ory Peck
has great
sincerity
and
"2,ah
excellent voice.
Gary
Grant's
-ilrnlng
Is
terrific; he has a great—feeling for the inherent rhythm of
a
scene. Jack Carson
is a
rejiJly
".
believable human being."Lund
-
thought next of some of the
la-
;
dfes:I
'"Olivia
de
HavUland
never
pos-
- es. There are no
anglesshe
hns• to protect: her
face photogrnnhs
"
well
from
every
angle.
So
she
Just
.
plays
a
scene.
Lorctta
Young
has
an
easyconversationalstyle,a• buoyancy, a
bubbling
quality.
Jean
.
Arthur plays
a
scene
the way a
-
virtuoso plays
a
piano.
After
a
;
comedy
fall,
say,
she, looks
for a
place
to
bring
the
icent
back
into
balanceand
keep
It
legitimate."
Gene
Tierney, Lund's
co-star In
"Th«
Elating
Season", is "averynice
girl,
bright
alert,
interested
In
everything." Lund didn't know
whst
special
qualities,
H
any, h»has
himself. One thing,
though:
he's sensitive about
hli
mouth.
He
much prefers
a
role
in
which
he
can half hide it behind a
mustache.
Glimpses
of Glammervljle:"Rhonda Fleming
Is glad to be
playing
a
meanle,
her
first such
role, In
"Ory
Danger".
"Other-wise
you get
typed."
After
sevenyears,includingco-stardomwithBlngCrosby
In
"AConnecticutYankee",
she's
still
remembered
for
her small part as a neurotic
In
"Spellbound"..
. .
Remember Bette
Davis'
lending
man,
Jim Davis,
In
the dlimnl"Winter
Meeting?"
Hewas Idle
for
ninemouths after
that,
except
for
plck-and-shovel workon
con-
struction jobs.
He
kept plugging
for
movie work,
though,
and nowhas six pictures awaiting
release.
I
found
him working as a
villain
the
other
rtny in
"The
BlackHills". Between pictures last
Jan-
uary
nnrt
February
he got a
con-
struction
job
on a San Fernando
Valley
hou.se.Jimmy Cagney, breaking
Into
atap
step
between
tnkes
on
"The
West Point Story", explained:
"Just
nervousness."
Demand
for
Family
Amusement
Center
Leads
to
Drive-In
Amerlct living, working andplaying
on
wheels
created
• de-
mand for a place of amusement
where
the
entire
family could go
at
a group
In
one
automobile
v/lthno parking worries and remain
In
thecar
and
thus
be
entertained.Hence
the
reason
for the
Airport
Drive-In Theatre
and
It'i
predeuea.
aori
thruoutthe
nation.The Airport
Drive-In
made to
order
for the entire
family
be*
cause
they remain
Intact
at
a
group while they
are
being
enter-
tained, wholesomely
and
eco-
nomically In the confine* and
com-
fort
of th* family
car.
One
of the
nice thing*
sbout see-
ing a show at the Airport Drive-
In
ii
that
you
don't
have
to
"dressup'.
Dad can
come
In
his shirtsleeves
and Mom is
In
styl«
wear-
ing
the
tame
dress
she had on
when
she
finished
the dishes. Just
come
as you
are,
Hoover
Again
Calls
For
U.N.
Without
Russ
Membership
EMPORIA,
Kas.
(m
Former
President
Herbert
Hoover
says
hop*
of lasting peace
lies
in
halt-
ing
military
aggression
and
reor-
ganizing the United Nations with-outthe Russian*.He
called
communismaforceofevil. He declared:"Today
the
mobilization
of non-Communist
nations
free
from
Rus-sian domination is slowly
unfold-ing,
"The
(United
Nations) SecurityCouncil has called upon Its mem-
bers
to
Join
In
repelling
the
aer-
gresslon against Korea.
.Some
42members have given that calltheir moral
support.
Three
other
nations have
so far lolncti with
111
in
th«military
measures
of
that
task.
"Wt
shall
«oon
know
how
much
of
the world Is prepared to
meet
thin
Ia»ue."
The
former
president
spoke
Tuesday night at a dedication of a
memorial
to the
lat«-
Kmporla
edi-
tor,William
Allen
White.
Bug
Likes
Weeds,
Not Food Crops
BERKELEYH) — A
remarkable
bug
IiHeliothls
Phloxlphaga
he
likes weeds
better
than food
crops.
Agricultural
research here
has
found
that this
insect
— relatedto the corn ear-worm — goes forsuch
plant
outeaitt
astarweed,
vinegar
weed,
phlox,
milkweed,dandelion,
California
poppy,andplantation. It is
also found
on
clo-
ven
and
alfalfa,
but
In
(he labora-
tory
it «ats
corn,
alfalfa
and
let-
tuce
only
when
deprived
of
weedsIt
eatt
tomato, cabbage
and
spin-ach
only
ai
a
last resort.
Publicity
Director
For
Interstate
CanSpinGood
Stories
Knownaffectionately
as
"Th*
Baron", Frank Starz.
above,
is di-rector
of
advertising
and
publicity.
No
one has
ever discovered
if th*
title
bestowedyearsagostems
from
his
love
of a
good
story,
or
his ability
to
"spin
a
yarn"
hlm-lelf. Either
would
be
true.
In
and around the
newspaper
business,
from
a police
reporter
upward
for
many
year*,
beforejoining Interstate
•Theatres
withwhom
hp
has long been associated,Starz
is
known from
coast
to
coast
wherever show-folks and
newspa-
permen gather.Onhand when
the
movie
stars
tour
Texas,
Starz
travels
with
the
group
to see
that everything
goes
smoothly.
.He was
last
in
Browns-
vllle with Alexis Smith and
JoelMcOrei
for the
two-nation
pre-miere
of
"South
of St.
Louis".
FRANKSTARZ
Arabs Are BannedFrom
Haifa
Docks
HAIFA,
Israel
1*1
Arab
pas-
sengers
on steamships calling at
Haifa
can
look
but
cannot
step
ashore.
TheFrench steamer
Prov-
idence
frequentlycarries a
large
number
of
Arabs, along with
other
passengers
who
disembark
in
Haifa.
The
Arabs always
ask
for,
itnd
always
fail
to
get,
permission
forshore leave tolookaround Haifa.Tourists
of
other
nationalities
get
every
facility.
CONGRATULATIONS
TO INTERSTATE THEATRES ONTHEOPENINGOF THE NEW
AIRPORT DRIVE-IN THEATRE
It was our
pleasure
to
have
been
abletofurnish
base
andgravelfor theconstructionof theAirport Drive-In.
W. H.
MOSER
CONSTRUCTION CO.
642 S.
Church
St.
Phont
2981
9 9
o
est Wishes
TO INTERSTATE
THEATRES
ON THE
OPENING
OF THE
DRIVE-IN
All of us here at College Food Market extendour
best
wishesfor a
successful
openingof theAirport Drive-ln Theatre.
We
are
open
7
days
a
week
. . . and you ere
cordially invited to visit us often.
College Food Market
t-«on
Mo»t,
Owner
Acron
From
PJC
Campus
Phone
2M
Robt.
Bishop NewDrive-ln Treasurer
ROBERT
BISHOP
Robert
Bishop,
treasurer
of
the
Airport
Drive-In
Theatre, hasbeen
in the
theatre business
anil
with
Interstate
six years.
A
nativeof
Paris,
Mr.Bishopbegan
as
treasurer
of the old
Re*
College
Offering
Janitors'
Course
NEWYORK WV~
Interested
in
becomingagood
janitor?
In
learn-ing
how to
fire
and
lay.
up a
boil-
er?
Maid
service
in
schools?
Re-
finishing
furniture/
and
chalk
boards? Managerial problems?Practical
aspects
of
time
and
mo-
tion
study? Then
go to
ColumbiaUniversity's
TeachersCollege
thia
summer.Onehundred school-buildingsu-
pervisors,
custodians,
Janitors,
and
engineers
are about to
start
a
school-plant
care
workshop
under
Dr.
Henry
H. Linn, professor
oteducation
anddirectorof thscourse. The purpose of th* work-
shop,
says Dr.
Linn,
is to stimu-late
the
Interest
of
building-serv-ice employees in their jobs, as
well
as to
help
them become more
efficient
and
economical
in the
opration of
their
school
plants
—DTM
Theatre and
with
the Main
Thea-
tre.
He is agraduateof
Paris
High
School.
*
estWishes...
To The New
AIRPORT
DRIVE-IN
THEATRE
On Their Opening Night!
i
We know you'll want to enjoy
this
new theatre
regularly
and take the whole family. The new Airport Drive-Infeatures a
modern
new snack bar with
delicious
foodsand drinks,andwe're proudtoannounce that deliciouslyfresh HONEY-KRUST
HOT DOG AND
HAMBURGER
BUNS
will we used exclusively.
Special
This Week-End!
Banana
Chiffon
CAKES
5O
BAKERY
Interstate's
New
AIRPORT
DRIVE-IN
THEATRE
Is
Among
the
Best
in the
Whole
Southwest
If
hat
been
our
pleasure
to
work
on
other drive-in theatres
inTexasand for
this reason fee!
that
we are
qualified
to
state
that
the
new
Airport
Drive-ln
Theatre
is.
among
thebestin the wholeSouthwest.
We
join
with
all
Paris, Northeast Texas
and
Southeast
Oklahoma
in
paying
tribute to the men of
Interstate
for
having
the
knowledge,
the
courage,
the
wisdom
and
foresight
in building
such
a
fine
place of
entertainment
for
this
area.It
was
a
pleasure
to be the generol
contractors
on
this
new
addition
to a
growing
Paris.
And
while
extending
sincere
congratulations
to
Interstate
also
take
this means
to
express
our
appreciation
for
th«
opportunity
of
working with
the
sub-contractors
on
thi*
job.
Th«
cooperation we
received from these skilled workmen
will
always be remembered and
appreciated.Sincerely,
J. R.
SPENCER
J. R. SPENCER CO.
GENERAL
CONTRACTORS
2849 Handley Drive
F
Worth,
TexaJ
 
THi
fAMS
HtWS.
THURSDAY. JO^Y
IS,
I
WO
-^-
PARTICIPATE
IN THE
OPENING
OF THE
NEW
^
rfitftott
DRIVE
IN
THEATRE!
The
Finest
'Hew
,
'
Theatre under
the
Stars
*
^
North
Texas
Drive put
tonight
where
the
cool
breezes
blow
. . .
utilize
such
modern facilities
as
individual
carspeakers
. . .
gigantic snow-white
screen
with
perfect visibility
from every
car
location
...
stream-lined
snack
bar and^patio
.^.
.
completely paved
Vjf
throughout.
*o*
JO-JO
THE
FAMOUSCLOWN
WITH
A
LOAD
OF
LAUGHS!
FAVORS
FOR THE
KIDS!
BUBBLE
GUM FOR THE
KIDS!]
BALLOONS FOR THE
KIDS!
CONVENIENTLY
LOCATED
TO
ALL PARTS
OF
PARIS
MHO
T.»r.
twou.
cox
SERVICE AT
THE
NEW
Stt*£**t
DRIVE
IN
STRESSES
COMFORT AND
CONVENIENCE
....
BRING
THE
KIDS
...
PLAYGROUND FOR THEKIDDIES
AND
MUCH
CHEAPER
THAN
A
BABY
SITTER!
HX
AT THE
NEW
/4i*£**t
DRIVE
IN
AHD
0*1
»
NOWSHOWING
PLAZA
PHONE
1412
...
Wb*n
R«fi»aoc»« Bullets
PerfUd
,
,
Ht«
Pioneer*
and
Courage