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SOPT Flash Curing a Print - Chapter Summary - Drying the Ink

SOPT Flash Curing a Print - Chapter Summary - Drying the Ink

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The last step in the screen printing process is the curing of the print.

Plastisol ink must reach a temperature of 320 degrees to be considered “fully cured.”Although it would seem natural to use the term “dryed,” it would be a misnomer, as the ink film on a product may feel “dry” to the touch, but not be fully cured throughout the entire ink deposit.

The print surface may seem “dry,” but the inner portion of the ink film may not be completely cured.

Learn more about screen printing:
http://www.screenprinting-aspa.com
The last step in the screen printing process is the curing of the print.

Plastisol ink must reach a temperature of 320 degrees to be considered “fully cured.”Although it would seem natural to use the term “dryed,” it would be a misnomer, as the ink film on a product may feel “dry” to the touch, but not be fully cured throughout the entire ink deposit.

The print surface may seem “dry,” but the inner portion of the ink film may not be completely cured.

Learn more about screen printing:
http://www.screenprinting-aspa.com

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Published by: American Screen Printing Association on Sep 29, 2009
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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06/08/2010

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Chapter 4 - Curing a Print
Learn at Home atYour Own Pace | Complete “How-to” Course
SECTION 7: Basic Screen Printing | CHAPTER OVERVIEWThe last step in the screen printing process is the curing of the print. Plastisol ink mustreach a temperature of 320 degrees to be considered “fully cured.”Although it wouldseem natural to use the term “dryed,” it would be a misnomer, as the ink film on a prod-uct may feel “dry” to the touch, but not be fully curedthroughout the entire ink deposit. The print surfacemay seem “dry,” but the inner portion of the ink filmmay not be completely cured.A print that is not fully cured will not stand up to awashing. The ink will come off during the washingcycle, as the ink was only ”gelled” and not thor-oughly cured.You can be sure that if the order of shirts that yousent out did not cure properly, you will found out thehard way by having the order returned to you.To avoid having your customer do your “cure tests” for you, we will offer some solutionsto help ensure that all of the products that leave your shop are fully cured.
Copyright © MMVIII, ASPA, Inc. All Rights Reserved

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