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The Sower.

The Sower.

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Published by glennpease
BY THE REV. S. NOLAND,

" Behold, there went out a sower to sow ; and it came to
pass, as he sowed, some fell by the way-side, and the fowls
of the air came and devoured it up. And some fell on stony
ground, where it had not much earth; and immediately it
sprung up, because it had no depth of earth ; but when the
sun was up, it was scorched; and because it had no root, it
withered away. And some fell among thorns, and the
thorns grew up, and choked it, and it yielded no fruit.
And other fell on good ground, and did yield fruit that
sprung up and increased, and brought forth, some thirty,
and some sixty, and some a hundred." Mark iv. 3-8.
BY THE REV. S. NOLAND,

" Behold, there went out a sower to sow ; and it came to
pass, as he sowed, some fell by the way-side, and the fowls
of the air came and devoured it up. And some fell on stony
ground, where it had not much earth; and immediately it
sprung up, because it had no depth of earth ; but when the
sun was up, it was scorched; and because it had no root, it
withered away. And some fell among thorns, and the
thorns grew up, and choked it, and it yielded no fruit.
And other fell on good ground, and did yield fruit that
sprung up and increased, and brought forth, some thirty,
and some sixty, and some a hundred." Mark iv. 3-8.

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Published by: glennpease on Feb 02, 2014
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08/03/2014

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The Sower. BY THE REV. S. NOLAND," Behold, there went out a sower to sow ; and it came to pass, as he sowed, some fell by the way-side, and the fowls of the air came and devoured it up. And some fell on stony ground, where it had not much earth; and immediately it sprung up, because it had no depth of earth ; but when the sun was up, it was scorched; and because it had no root, it withered away. And some fell among thorns, and the thorns grew up, and choked it, and it yielded no fruit. And other fell on good ground, and did yield fruit that sprung up and increased, and brought forth, some thirty, and some sixty, and some a hundred." Mark iv. 3-8. THE parable of the sower is among the first of all our Lord's parables. It evidently made a deep impression when it was spoken, as three of the sacred writers give it a place in their Gospel. Found-ed on agricultural life, it is adapted to all lands and times, as perhaps a majority of all who read it will be employed in tilling the ground. As city, town, and country, all depend upon the cultivated field for bodily sustenance, this parable is eminently
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proper as showing, in the very beginning of our (27) 28 Our Lord's Parables. Saviour's ministry, the nature of his gospel in giving spiritual light and life to all men. Matthew and Mark record this parable in exactly six verses each, while Luke, whose style is always perspicuous, employs only four verses. As a proof that this was not by concert of action between them, Ave have but to state to the reader that the original manuscript of the Gospels was not divided into vers-es and chapters, but this division is a work of later date. As an unusual number of figures appear in the recital — sower, seed, ground, way -side, thorny ground, good ground, thirty, sixty, and a hundred fold of grain, and other circumstances — the belief is strong that the parable made a deep impression on their minds from the lucid and brief statement
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of all its terms by three writers, in nearly the same number of words. We believe that the products of the field earned by the sweat of the brow w T ere intended before all other work to be the employment of the large ma- jority of mankind after the fall. The country is large and the town small in the comparison. Cow-per wrote, " God made the country and man made the town." Vast acres are spread over all the land adapted to every variety of growth knowm to man. All the industries are studied by men with great labor of invention and experiment, but God makes the soil and the seed, and gives the rain and the sun-shine, and the right temperature, and man only ap-The Sower. 29 plies his gifts, and the earth brings forth seed-time and harvest. How many young men miss the noblest calling of life when they refuse to cultivate the field !
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