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The Pharisee and Publican.

The Pharisee and Publican.

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Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
BY THE REV. S. NOLAND,

"And lie spake this parable unto certain which trusted
in themselves that they were righteous, and despised others:
Two men went up into the temple to pray ; the one a Phar-
isee, and the other a publican. The Pharisee stood and
prayed thus with himself, God, I thank thee that I am not
as other men are, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even
as this publican. I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of
all that I possess. And the publican, standing afar off,
would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but
smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a
sinner. I tell you this man went down to his house justi-
fied rather than the other: for every one that exalteth
himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself
shall be exalted/' Luke xviii. 9-14.
BY THE REV. S. NOLAND,

"And lie spake this parable unto certain which trusted
in themselves that they were righteous, and despised others:
Two men went up into the temple to pray ; the one a Phar-
isee, and the other a publican. The Pharisee stood and
prayed thus with himself, God, I thank thee that I am not
as other men are, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even
as this publican. I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of
all that I possess. And the publican, standing afar off,
would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but
smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a
sinner. I tell you this man went down to his house justi-
fied rather than the other: for every one that exalteth
himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself
shall be exalted/' Luke xviii. 9-14.

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Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Feb 02, 2014
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The Pharisee and Publican. BY THE REV. S. NOLAND,"And lie spake this parable unto certain which trusted in themselves that they were righteous, and despised others: Two men went up into the temple to pray ; the one a Phar-isee, and the other a publican. The Pharisee stood and prayed thus with himself, God, I thank thee that I am not as other men are, extortioners, unjust, adulterers, or even as this publican. I fast twice in the week, I give tithes of all that I possess. And the publican, standing afar off, would not lift up so much as his eyes unto heaven, but smote upon his breast, saying, God be merciful to me a sinner. I tell you this man went down to his house justi-fied rather than the other: for every one that exalteth himself shall be abased; and he that humbleth himself shall be exalted/' Luke xviii. 9-14. TWO persons, a Pharisee and a publican, appear in this parable as the representatives of two re-ligious views which, are more controverted than any known among men. Those who rely upon a literal performance of duties and good works for salvation, and those who rely entirely upon the grace of God
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as manifested in the mediation of Jesus Christ, are represented. The first religious controversy in the (171) 172 Our Lord's Parables. world was between two brothers, Cain and Abel, ending in murder, and involving the issue here stated. Abel brought an offering full of shed blood, which looked to the coming of Christ, whose blood would cleanse from all sin ; while Cain brought the fruit of the ground, and perhaps the very best fruit, as an offering unto the Lord. Unto both Cain and his offering God had no respect. Without the shedding of blood there could be no remission of sins. Unto Abel and his offering God had respect. In both instances the man and the offering are named together, the character of the latter deter-mining the fate of the former. Cain's obedience was prompt and liberal enough, but it omitted rec-onciliation by shed blood and divine grace. He
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trusted in himself that he was righteous. Certain persons in the presence of Jesus had the same opin-ion of their own goodness and merits, and this false theory of justification led the Saviour in his own way by parable to set forth the difference between these two systems of religious faith. We think the introductory statement preceding the parable shows clearly that w r e have taken the right view of its meaning. And he spake this parable unto certain which trusted in themselves; that they were righteous and depised others. The Pharisee in the parable represents all who rely upon good works and obedience to specific com-mands for salvation. He is presented as the very The Pharisee and Publican. 173 best of the class. Error begets extremes, and it is easy to run back on the line from those who almost recognize the necessity of the witness of the Spirit and the atonement of Christ to those who believe
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