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My Works in T Qatar - The New York Times Style Magazine - Jan/Feb 2014 Issue

My Works in T Qatar - The New York Times Style Magazine - Jan/Feb 2014 Issue

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Published by Debrina Aliyah
My Works in T Qatar - The New York Times Style Magazine - Jan/Feb 2014 Issue

a) More Than Just a Dress
Speaking to an immensely attentive audience at the recent art conservation conference organized by the Orientalist Museum and held at the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, Frances Hartog related the mesmerizing tale of how a 53-year-old Dior Zemire dress came to be in the possession of the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in London. Hartog, the museum's senior textile conservator, was the key person involved in the restoration of this legendary dress, of which it was once thought no versions had survived. The original costume was shown in Dior’s 1954 Winter collection at Blenheim Palace to an audience that included Britain's Princess Margaret, but this version of the Zemire was commissioned by the wife of a leading British textile manufacturer to showcase his new semi-synthetic fabric. “Little else is known about the history of the dress until it turned up in a Paris auction, at which time it was said to have been found in a cellar close to the Seine and possibly worn for fancy dress,” Hartog said. The dress was bought at the auction by curator Claire Wilcox, and underwent diligent restoration work by Hartog’s team to prepare it for a 1940s and 50s haute couture exhibition that took place in 1997 at the V&A. More than a decade later, the dress is still celebrated, as it marks one of the most important textile restoration works in the world. “It is considered to be Dior’s most historically-inspired piece and a departure from his more familiar avant-garde work,” she explains. Hartog was one of the panelists at the Doha conference, which focused on artwork from past to present and the integral role restoration plays in preserving art for the next generation.
My Works in T Qatar - The New York Times Style Magazine - Jan/Feb 2014 Issue

a) More Than Just a Dress
Speaking to an immensely attentive audience at the recent art conservation conference organized by the Orientalist Museum and held at the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, Frances Hartog related the mesmerizing tale of how a 53-year-old Dior Zemire dress came to be in the possession of the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in London. Hartog, the museum's senior textile conservator, was the key person involved in the restoration of this legendary dress, of which it was once thought no versions had survived. The original costume was shown in Dior’s 1954 Winter collection at Blenheim Palace to an audience that included Britain's Princess Margaret, but this version of the Zemire was commissioned by the wife of a leading British textile manufacturer to showcase his new semi-synthetic fabric. “Little else is known about the history of the dress until it turned up in a Paris auction, at which time it was said to have been found in a cellar close to the Seine and possibly worn for fancy dress,” Hartog said. The dress was bought at the auction by curator Claire Wilcox, and underwent diligent restoration work by Hartog’s team to prepare it for a 1940s and 50s haute couture exhibition that took place in 1997 at the V&A. More than a decade later, the dress is still celebrated, as it marks one of the most important textile restoration works in the world. “It is considered to be Dior’s most historically-inspired piece and a departure from his more familiar avant-garde work,” she explains. Hartog was one of the panelists at the Doha conference, which focused on artwork from past to present and the integral role restoration plays in preserving art for the next generation.

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Published by: Debrina Aliyah on Feb 03, 2014
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10
T Qatar: The New York Times Style Magazine
   F   I   D   E   F   A   S   H   I   O   N   W   E   E   K
Publisher & Editor-In-Chief
Yousuf Jassem Al Darwish
Chief Executive
Sandeep Sehgal
Executive Vice President
Alpana Roy
Vice President
Ravi Raman
EDITORIAL
Editor
Sindhu Nair
Deputy Editor
Srinivasan V.L
Chief Fashion Correspondent
Debrina Aliyah
Senior Correspondents
Abigail MathiasAyswarya MurthyEzdihar Ibrahim Ali
Sub-Editor
Sue Eedle
ART
 
Senior Art Director
Venkat Reddy
Deputy Art Director
Hanan Abu Saiam
Assistant Art Director
Ayush Indrajith
Senior Graphic Designer
 Maheshwar Reddy
Photography
Rob Altamirano
MARKETING AND SALES
Senior Manager – Marketing
Zulfikar Jiffry
Assistant Manager – Marketing
Thomas Jose
Media Consultants
Hassan RekkabLydia Youssef
Marketing Research & Support Executive
Kanwal Baluch
Accountant
 Pratap Chandran
Senior Distribution Executive
Bikram Shrestha
Distribution Support
Arjun TimilsinaBhimal RaiBasanta Pokhrel
T, THE STYLE MAGAZINE OF THE NEW YORK TIMES
Editor in Chief
Deborah Needleman
Creative Director
Patrick Li
Deputy Editor
Whitney Vargas
Fashion Director at Large
Joe McKenna
Managing Editor
George Gustines
Photography Director
Nadia Vellam
THE NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICES
General Manager
Michael Greenspon
Vice President, Licensing and Syndication
Alice Ting
Vice President, Executive Editor The New York Times News Service & Syndicate
Nancy Lee
LICENSED EDITIONS
Editorial Director
Josephine Schmidt
Editor, T International Editions
George Gustines
Coordinators
Gary CaesarJessie Sandler
PUBLISHED BY
Oryx Advertising Co WLL
P.O. Box 3272; Doha-Qatar Tel: (+974) 44672139, 44550983, 44671173, 44667584 Fax: (+974) 44550982Email: tqatar@omsqatar.com website: www.omsqatar.com
COPYRIGHT INFO
T, The New York Times Style Magazine, and the T logo are trademarks of The New York Times Co., NY, NY, USA, and are used under license by Oryx Media, Qatar. Content reproduced from T, The New York Times Style Magazine, copyright The New York Times Co. and/or its contributors 2014 all rights reserved. The views and opinions expressed within T-Qatar are not necessarily those of The New York Times Company or those of its contributors.
Lookout Qatar
22
Lookout Qatar
Frances Hartog relates the mesmerizing tale of a 53-year-old Dior Zemire dress at a conference at Doha's Museum of Islamic Art; Alia El Tanani of the luxury design company Living In Interiors has an eye for the unusual; Tod’s leather collection for men is all about the double stripe; the Lady Arpels Ballerine Enchantée watch takes its inspiration from dancing butter󰁦lies and fairies.
24
Culture Cue
Doha wants to hold on to its charming history but by reimagining it. The Old Doha Prize brings together architects from two countries, Qatar and UK, to revive old Doha
bringing the idea of a global world to reality.
By Sindhu Nair.
25
Showing Now
Jordanian artist Jehad Al-Ameri is in󰁦luenced by three places: a village in Jordan; Baghdad; and Granada in Spain.
By Abigail Mathias.
26
Market Watch
The spotlight is on the jewelry that will be the highlight of a luxury exhibition, the Doha Jewelry and Watches Exhibition.
By Debrina Aliyah.
 
29
Trend Report
A Middle East-exclusive preview of the Gap Spring/ Summer 2014 Collection.
By Priyanka Pradhan.
QualityQatar
39
O Couture!
A new couture showing in Singapore put the focus on Asian designers as it paved way for the formation of a new federation of designers.
By Alexandra Kohut-Cole.
FeaturesQatar
74
The New Breed
We bring you the new decision-makers in a country that is on its development path, the youthful go-getters who know that for a nation to grow, they first have to effect change from within.
By Ayswarya Murthy, Debrina Aliyah and Sindhu Nair.Photographs by AbdulRahman Al-Baker
 
Lookout Qatar
More Than Just a Dress
Speaking to an immensely attentive audience at the recent art conservation conference organized by the Orientalist Museum and held at the Museum of Islamic Art in Doha, Frances Hartog related the mesmerizing tale of how a 53-year-old Dior Zemire dress came to be in the possession of the Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) in London. Hartog, the museum's senior textile conservator, was the key person involved in the restoration of this legendary dress, of which it was once thought no versions had survived. The original costume was shown in Dior’s 1954 Winter collection at Blenheim Palace to an audience that included Britain's Princess Margaret, but this version of the Zemire was commissioned by the wife of a leading British textile manufacturer to showcase his new semi-synthetic fabric. “Little else is known about the history of the dress until it turned up in a Paris auction, at which time it was said to have been found in a cellar close to the Seine and possibly worn for fancy dress,” Hartog said. The dress was bought at the auction by curator Claire Wilcox, and underwent diligent restoration work by Hartog’s team to prepare it for a 1940s and 50s haute couture exhibition that took place in 1997 at the V&A. More than a decade later, the dress is still celebrated, as it marks one of the most important textile restoration works in the world. “It is considered to be Dior’s most historically-inspired piece and a departure from his more familiar avant-garde work,” she explains. Hartog was one of the panelists at the Doha conference, which focused on artwork from past to present and the integral role restoration plays in preserving art for the next generation.
DEBRINA ALIYAH
Dancing to Time
Depicting a female figure
 part dancer, part butter󰁦ly
 this creation perpetuates the tradition of ballerinas and fairies to which Van Cleef & Arpels is so attached. Yet it is not only in design but also in the mechanics of timekeeping that the
maison
 has borrowed its theme from a ballerina. On a watch with a retrograde display, the hands, instead of turning about an axis, trace an arc before returning to their initial position to begin another cycle. Here, when the user presses a button at the 8 o’clock position, the ballerina’s tutu comes to life. The veil indicating the hours rises first, followed by the second veil, which positions itself against the minute scale. They remain in place, enabling the time to be read, then return simultaneously to their initial positions. One of the feats of this complication lies in its 󰁦luid movement: the ballerina appears to move her wings with grace and poise. For its Lady Arpels Ballerine Enchantée watch, Van Cleef & Arpels has drawn inspiration from a quote by dancing legend Anna Pavlova that echoes the imagery of the
maison
: ‘’I’ve been dreaming that I was a ballerina, and that I was spending my whole life dancing as lightly as a butter󰁦ly...’’
SINDHU NAIR
   P   H   O   T   O   G   R   A   P   H   S   C   O   U   R   T   S   E   Y  :   V   I   C   T   O   R   I   A   A   N   D   A   L   B   E   R   T   M   U   S   E   U   M   󰀨   V   &   A   󰀩 ,   V   A   N   C   L   E   E   F   &   A   R   P   E   L   S
Timeless Tribute
The new collection from brand Gant is said to be a tribute to its heritage and the seasons take on American sportswear. A mix of tradition and innovation, classic elegance and modern sportiness is the main source of inspiration. Re󰁦ined elegance seems to be the brands motto this season. 
GANT Time FW 2013 collection is available at select Paris Gallery, Time House and Blue Salon outlets across Qatar.
ALL PRICES ARE INDICATIVE

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