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Table Of Contents

A FEMINIST APPROACHTO LEVINAS
A LEVINASIAN APPROACHTO FEMINISM
BIRTH, TIME, ETHICS
Beauvoir’sAccount of Reproduction
TAKE 2: BIRTHASAN AMBIGUOUS SITUATION
Arendt on Time, Natality, and Reproduction
VITA ACTIVA: LABOR, WORK, ACTION
THE TEMPORALITYOF ACTION: PROMISEAND FORGIVENESS
THINKINGTHROUGH NATALITY
REPRODUCING NATALITY: CAVARERO’S READINGOF ARENDT
Birth as the Gift of the FeminineOther
PATERNITYAS INFINITE DISCONTINUITY
OTHERWISETHAN PATERNITY: IRIGARAY READING LEVINAS
TIMEANDTHE MATERNAL BODY
MOSESAND HIS MOTHERS: NUMBERS 11:12
LEVINAS BETWEEN ETHICSAND POLITICS
ALTERED MATERNITIES
Notes
Bibliography
Index
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The Gift of the Other - Levinas and the Politics of Reproduction

The Gift of the Other - Levinas and the Politics of Reproduction

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Published by Abraham Maharba
From the Intro by Lisa Guenther: This book considers the ethical and temporal significance of birth as the gift of the Other. This gift is unique in that it gives rise to its own recipient;the child who receives the gift of birth exists only thanks to this gift. In this sense, birth is not only given to me; it also gives me, bringing me forth into a world in which I have always already responded to Others. Birth marks the beginning of my own existence in time; but the givenness of birth suggests that my existence is not quite my own, that my time is already bound up with the time of the Other. How might one respond ethically to the maternal gift of time and existence? I approach this question from two directions at once:through a reading of Levinas on time and ethics, and through a feminist critique of birth and reproduction. Levinas’s account of responsibility gives me a language to articulate the ethical and temporal dimensions of birth as the gift of the Other; but Levinas’s own ambivalent discourse on maternity and the feminine demands a feminist response. The material, embodied, and gendered significance of birth has been carefully explored by many feminist philosophers, but something important can be learned about the ethics and temporality of birth from Levinas’s account of responsibility. By reading Levinas alongside the work of Beauvoir, Arendt, Irigaray, Kristeva, and Cornell, I hope to generate new approaches to the theory—and practice—of motherhood as the gift of the Other.
From the Intro by Lisa Guenther: This book considers the ethical and temporal significance of birth as the gift of the Other. This gift is unique in that it gives rise to its own recipient;the child who receives the gift of birth exists only thanks to this gift. In this sense, birth is not only given to me; it also gives me, bringing me forth into a world in which I have always already responded to Others. Birth marks the beginning of my own existence in time; but the givenness of birth suggests that my existence is not quite my own, that my time is already bound up with the time of the Other. How might one respond ethically to the maternal gift of time and existence? I approach this question from two directions at once:through a reading of Levinas on time and ethics, and through a feminist critique of birth and reproduction. Levinas’s account of responsibility gives me a language to articulate the ethical and temporal dimensions of birth as the gift of the Other; but Levinas’s own ambivalent discourse on maternity and the feminine demands a feminist response. The material, embodied, and gendered significance of birth has been carefully explored by many feminist philosophers, but something important can be learned about the ethics and temporality of birth from Levinas’s account of responsibility. By reading Levinas alongside the work of Beauvoir, Arendt, Irigaray, Kristeva, and Cornell, I hope to generate new approaches to the theory—and practice—of motherhood as the gift of the Other.

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Published by: Abraham Maharba on Oct 01, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/16/2013

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