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The Resurrection of Jesus

The Resurrection of Jesus

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Published by glennpease
BY PASTOR ELWOOD

KEIM begins his classical discussion of the Resur-
rection of Jesus with these words: "The history
of every human life ends at the grave. It is an axiom
of ancient and modern times that the dead do not rise.
BY PASTOR ELWOOD

KEIM begins his classical discussion of the Resur-
rection of Jesus with these words: "The history
of every human life ends at the grave. It is an axiom
of ancient and modern times that the dead do not rise.

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Published by: glennpease on Feb 05, 2014
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THE RESURRECTION OF JESUS BY PASTOR ELWOODKEIM begins his classical discussion of the Resur-rection of Jesus with these words: "The history of every human life ends at the grave. It is an axiom of ancient and modern times that the dead do not rise. The elder Pliny finds a melancholy consolation for all the weaknesses of men in the thought that not even God can wake the dead. . . . Tradition makes a differ-ence in the case of Jesus. To him there was deliverance from death upon the earth itself. . . . This tradition has been vigorously attacked from the beginning until now by Jews and heathen and at last by Christians also. Formerly the attack was prompted by hatred, now by love of truth." It is safe to say that since these words were penned no such acute discussion of every phase of the question has appeared. Biblical science and psychology have developed far beyond Keim's standpoint in 1871, but no man has discussed this problem from so many sound points of view or with such refined subtlety as Theodor Keim in the last volume of his Jems of Nazara.
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Of the four latest investigators, Oscar Holzmann, Schmiedel, Sanday, and Dobschutz, the first two appear 137 RELIGION AND LIFE to reject all reality of fact and to content themselves with supplying plausible motives. Of all these Schmiedel is by far the most learned, painstaking and ingenious. His treatment of the resurrection, 1 however, is too exclusively critical and literary, and his psychological explanation lacks the simplicity and brilliancy of Renan's. All that he claims for his argument is "The possibility, the probability if you will, of the explana-tion from subjective visions." Holzmann displays a very half-hearted interest in the subject, and contents himself with tracing a plausible psychological develop-ment in the series of visions recorded in I Corinthians which he seems inclined to refer to mental suggestions, and dismisses the subject. Sanday, as Canon Henson complains, gives the impression of shrinking from the
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real question, and his analysis of the facts is so slight that it is difficult to see wherein he has advanced the discussion. Dobschutz in his interesting little mono-graph, "Ostern and Pfingsten," concerns himself chiefly with the empty grave and the appearance to the five hundred brethren which he identifies with the manifestation of the Spirit at Pentecost. Lastly, light has sprung up from an unexpected quarter in the posthumous work of Frederick Myers, to whom I shall revert later. Whatever our predilection, however stanch our faith, educated men to-day recognize that this fortress is not to be taken by storm. To think to find a smooth and easy way to certainty in this matter, as Keim says, is a i " Resurrection and Ascension Narratives," Encyclopaedia Biblica, 138 THE RESURRECTION OF JESUS
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