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Karel Kryl- Democracy and The Life of A Protest Singer

Karel Kryl- Democracy and The Life of A Protest Singer

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THE LIFE OF A PROTEST-SINGER
Karel Kryl, the interesting Czech folk singer was born on April 12th 1944 in the Moravian town of Kroměříž where he also spent his infancy. His grandfather established a printing house in the town of Nový Jičín. This was probably among the three best printers in the precommunist Czechoslovakia. They printed works by the best-known Czech and Slovak writers and poets, for example Karel Čapek or Jiří Deml, but they also printed many German books. Thanks to his surroundings Karel read many books since his childhood and he loved literature very much. When he was 5 years old, the Communist party won the general election in the Czechoslovakia, and a few months later he was forced to watch while communist militia men destroyed their printing machines. His father had to go work in a factory.
THE LIFE OF A PROTEST-SINGER
Karel Kryl, the interesting Czech folk singer was born on April 12th 1944 in the Moravian town of Kroměříž where he also spent his infancy. His grandfather established a printing house in the town of Nový Jičín. This was probably among the three best printers in the precommunist Czechoslovakia. They printed works by the best-known Czech and Slovak writers and poets, for example Karel Čapek or Jiří Deml, but they also printed many German books. Thanks to his surroundings Karel read many books since his childhood and he loved literature very much. When he was 5 years old, the Communist party won the general election in the Czechoslovakia, and a few months later he was forced to watch while communist militia men destroyed their printing machines. His father had to go work in a factory.

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Published by: docsokrates on Oct 01, 2009
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Karel Kryl- Democracy
Democracy flourish, albeit with a cosmetic defect:those who steal over the years, now double steal,those who tortured us for years, we throw the work,and those who sing the truth, today had made a traitor.Those who tortured us for years, we throw the work,and those who sing the truth, today had made a traitor.Democracy thrive without us and pragmatic,we talk together for beer, as we have always grumbled, pastor promised heaven and waiting for the property,we will feed Forbes for two or three dimes pastor promised us heaven and waiting for estates,we will feed Forbes for two or three dimes.Democracy prevailed, sings us Gott and Walda,we eat without soybean fat at McDonald's uncle,King Wenceslas is a bunch of shit with moneychangers under one roof with a party on the gravy train meets.King Wenceslas is a bunch of shit with moneychangers under one roof with a party on the gravy train meets.Democracy exists from Humenné to Aš,velvet and tenderness in the Lord and teeth were broken off,
 
gave us the new harness and, although we Oxbow burns,occupy positions, rather than standing.They gave us a new harness and, although we Oxbow burns,occupy positions, rather than standing.Democracy matures into gastric ulcers,without honesty, without the right and above whatever,and it is a misconception private, perhaps an optical illusion that the place has a heart,stomach and soul instead of his mouth.A misconception is that private, perhaps an optical illusion that the place has a heart,stomach and soul instead of mouth.http://www.allthelyrics.com/lyrics/karel_kryl/http://www.musicology.upol.cz/www/iaspm/thelife.htmlKarel Kryl, the interesting Czech folk singer was born on April 12th 1944 in the Moravian town of Kroměříž where he also spent his infancy. His grandfather established a printing house in the town of  Nový Jičín. This was probably among the three best printers in the precommunist Czechoslovakia.They printed works by the best-known Czech and Slovak writers and poets, for example Karel Čapek or Jiří Deml, but they also printed many German books. Thanks to his surroundings Karel read many books since his childhood and he loved literature very much. When he was 5 years old, the Communist party won the general election in the Czechoslovakia, and a few months later he was forced to watchwhile communist militia men destroyed their printing machines. His father had to go work in a factory.Karel did not have many positive memories about people in his surroundings during his childhood. Inhis writings he often recalled the scoffs of his school-mates, because he usually wore old, patchedclothes. They very often did not have enough money to buy new clothes, because of his father's political inaction. They also lived in an old house with icebounded walls during each winter and withmany rats. In spite of such slightings and material trouble he had a place full of love in his family.Though at school he usually made A's, he did not receive good references for his studies, because of  politics again. When he was 15 years old, after he finished his primary education, he went to the TreatSchool of Ceramics in the town of Bechyně. There, in the dormitory, a happier period in his live began.Karel made new friends, started learning playing the guitar and wrote a lot of verses for girls andwomen he had admired. He made jokes about those years of his treat school many years later:" Youknow, guy, if you are short and ugly, you must be interesting, at least." He also started playing inamateur theatricals.After he had passed his graduation exam, he worked in a factory and then, in 1963, he had to fulfill hismilitary obligations. "It was a terrible experience and a completely stolen time", said Karel Kryl aboutit. His barracks were located in a former convent, that had been destroyed by the army. For the bulk of his time in the army he worked as a draftsman. He was not an exemplary good soldier at all thereforehe was not granted much free time to go out. That is probably why he finally decided to volunteer at alibrary in the barracks . He wanted to create an island of freedom there and he started calling the library"Krylárna" which comes from his last name. There, in "Krylárna", soldiers read books, talked about politicians and listened to news of the radio-station Free Europe. The station was jammed with specialmachines in Czechoslovakia but they had good, non-interfered listening, because they could receive thefrequency of Free Europe from military radars. On the radio-station, there were nice songs, too.Therefore they listened to them not just in "Krylárna" but they also released them for the local relay
 
radio in the barracks. Everything was all right, until one of the new station-monitors overslept and after the songs ended, the news, which was forbidden, started to be broadcast. Kryl and several other soldierswho were involved in that affair, received a punishment. Kryl and other barracks-mates also wrote a play named "Nálet na blby" which means "The Raid On Idiots". The play showed in a very ironicalway the conditions inside the army and politics. The play was taken into consideration and its authorswent to perform the play in a general military competition. But then some judges realized, what andwhom the play was about. The play was prohibited in the end.After completing his military obligations, Kryl worked as a scorcher in a ceramics factory andcontinued writting his songs and poems. In that time he definitively established his style - singingnarrative songs with the simple accompaniment of his guitar. He never wanted to be an excellentmusician and words were much more important for him, than the music. Although the trend at that timewas to compose lyrics in English or in a kind of "English" dialect, Kryl preferred to use the Czechlanguage . This made it possible for such a narrative style as to bring across his message. In December 1966 he performed his songs in the Czech town of Litvínov. There, for the first time, they called him a"protest-singer". Songs that he had written in that time, for example "Tráva" (The Grass) or "Anděl"(The Angel), had a strong accent against militarization and war. Then he recorded some of his songs ata local radio-station. He was very proud of himself and expected to be famous but nothing remarkablehappened. He still worked as a scorcher until he accidentally demolished a furnace.Afterwards he left the factory, and a blues band asked him to write lyrics to their songs. Karellost the job in the end because the members of the band wanted English lyrics while Karel wanted towrite in Czech. Like many people in Czechoslovakia Karel did not speak English at all and did notwant to write anything, which would be impossible when using some borrowed, but not understoodEnglish words and phrases. Then he changed several jobs and among others he worked as a helper atPrague's TV-station.The political climate in 1968 was rather relaxed, Karel gave several concerts and some of his songsclimbed the charts in Czechoslovakian hit-parades. But then, in August of 1968, the Russian armystarted to occupy Czechoslovakia to bring politics in line with Russian policy. In response to theRussian invasion Karel published a project "Bratříček" (Little Brother) with a very successful song"Bratříčku, zavírej vrátka" (Little Brother, Close the Gate).The situation in the field of politics and civil rights was gradually changing and people who didnot agree with the official politics, became "unconfortable". Several of Karel's concerts were canceledand publication of his new book of verses was prohibited. In September 1969 Karel was very lucky andreceived a 14-day´s visa to Western Germany where he took a part in a festival of folk singers. At thesame time the political situation worsened and politicians of the Eastern Block erected the Iron Curtain.Karel would speak only Czech and Russian, he did not speak German at all, nevertheless he decided tostay there and be free. His 14 days were extended to 20 years. Karel Kryl worked for the radio-stationFree Europe covering sports, and he had his own program about music and songs. He also wrote many poems and songs there, recorded them and published his books, usually at his own expenses. In spite of the big effort to jam the frequency of Free Europe, people in Czechoslovakia listened to this radiostation and they also learned Kryl´s songs. Many people recorded them secretly and wrote down thelyrics. In paradox, some younger people including myself learned Kryl's songs in summer camps for children that were organized by Czech Socialistic Association of Young People [ČSSM].The record "Bratříčku, zavírej vrátka" seems to be definitively the most famous Kryl's album. Itwas recorded just before he left Czechoslovakia. Kryl became a symbol of the struggle for political,civil and social rights for many people.After the Velvet Revolution in 1989, he moved back to Czechoslovakia. His concerts were agreat success and some people started to idolize and worship him. Kryl disliked this treatment and

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