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SCIENCE

SCIENCE

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Published by glennpease
BY ROBERT F. HORTON

It is evident to every observer that the old enemies,
science and religion, are coming to terms. At first
they agreed to a delimitation of frontier, and entered
into an engagement not to invade each other's do-
main. That delimitation has not lost its value, but
the relations of the high contracting parties have
become more friendly.
BY ROBERT F. HORTON

It is evident to every observer that the old enemies,
science and religion, are coming to terms. At first
they agreed to a delimitation of frontier, and entered
into an engagement not to invade each other's do-
main. That delimitation has not lost its value, but
the relations of the high contracting parties have
become more friendly.

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Published by: glennpease on Feb 10, 2014
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02/16/2014

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SCIENCE BY ROBERT F. HORTON It is evident to every observer that the old enemies, science and religion, are coming to terms. At first they agreed to a delimitation of frontier, and entered into an engagement not to invade each other's do-main. That delimitation has not lost its value, but the relations of the high contracting parties have become more friendly. The two confess a mutual need, and neither wishes to remain rigorously marked off from the other. On the one hand, religion is borrowing more and more daily the methods of sci-ence. On the other hand, science is interpreting the nature and necessity of religion. It is slowly dawning on the intelligence of our time that the antagonism never was between science and religion, but only between science and dogma. When the Church took the place of the Empire, and constituted herself the mouthpiece of God on the earth, she took over the assumptions and claims of the Emperor. To question her authority, and Aot to bow down to her decisions, was kEsa majestas, a
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kind of high treason. She not only claimed a uni-versal knowledge, but reserved the right to torture i88 SCIENCE 189 and kill those who would not accept the knowledge she offered them. It was quite in the spirit of the Catholic Church when Cosmas Indicopleustes de-clared that it was heresy to maintain the possibility of sailing roimd the world; not a physical or geo-graphical impossibility, observe, but a heresy, a sin which, according to the mediaeval view, was pimish-able with death. The most humiliating scene that ever occurred in Italy — humiliating, not for science, but for the Church — was when Galileo was compelled by ecclesiastical authority to declare that the earth does not move roimd the sim, and left the august presence murmuring, **E pur si muove." Science rightly re-
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sents this interference with the sacred pursuit of truth, this blatant and insolent infallibility of igno-rance claiming to control the simlit realm of know-ledge. Just so far as mediaeval ecclesiasticism sur-vives, science is in antagonism with it, and must continue the war to the death. Science is the cham-pion of the human spirit against the tyranny of superstition, of obscurantism, of degrading ecclesi-astical ambition. But, in enlightened countries to-day, it is well understood that ecclesiasticism and religion are not only not the same, but necessarily antagonistic. Ecclesiasticism is not more the enemy of science than of religion. Religion and science have drawn together in the recognition of a common foe. Thus Professor Duncan, closing his review of the I^ GSEAT ISSUES New Knowledge, by which he means the new theory
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