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Hidden from Plain Sight Sample Pages

Hidden from Plain Sight Sample Pages

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Young physicist Jenna Wilkes has done the impossible—and the whole scientific world is shaking on its pillars.

Could it be that conventional science has misunderstood the very fabric of the universe? Could there be infinitely more to it than anyone has ever guessed? Could science’s whole concept of reality be ... unreal?

Jenna’s discovery drills into the heart of reality itself—and that’s why the Establishment is so determined to suppress it. How far will they go to hide the truth? Big-name scientists, the Pentagon, and shady politicians plot and scheme to silence her, one way or another. They did it once, seven years earlier. This time the stakes are incalculably higher.

Jenna has more than just a scientific revolution in her hands. If the Establishment can’t stop her, the whole world will be changed in ways not even Jenna can imagine.

Reading level: Ages 15 and up
Young physicist Jenna Wilkes has done the impossible—and the whole scientific world is shaking on its pillars.

Could it be that conventional science has misunderstood the very fabric of the universe? Could there be infinitely more to it than anyone has ever guessed? Could science’s whole concept of reality be ... unreal?

Jenna’s discovery drills into the heart of reality itself—and that’s why the Establishment is so determined to suppress it. How far will they go to hide the truth? Big-name scientists, the Pentagon, and shady politicians plot and scheme to silence her, one way or another. They did it once, seven years earlier. This time the stakes are incalculably higher.

Jenna has more than just a scientific revolution in her hands. If the Establishment can’t stop her, the whole world will be changed in ways not even Jenna can imagine.

Reading level: Ages 15 and up

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Published by: Chalcedon Foundation on Feb 10, 2014
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/21/2014

 
Storehouse Press is the registered trademark of Storehouse Press, Inc. This book is a work of fiction. Names, characters, businesses, organizations,
 places, events, and incidents either are the product of the author’s imagination
 or used fictitiously. Any resemblance to actual persons, living or dead, events, or locales is entirely coincidental. Copyright © 2010 by M. G. Selbrede All rights reserved, including the right of reproduction in whole or in part in any form. Book design by Kirk DouPonce (www.DogEaredDesign.com) Printed in the United States of America First Edition Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data is available. ISBN-13: 978-1-891375-51-4 ISBN-10: 1-891375-51-2
 The author wishes to thank the following individuals for their valuable contributions (inspirational, editorial, philosophical, and/or technical) to the manuscript during its  protracted evolution: Susan Burns, Dean Davis, Lee Duigon, Ben Finklea, John Ford,
Darlene Valerie Hall (who would have approved), Arnold “Eucatastrophe” Jagt, Joanna
Jagt, Rosie Jagt, Chuck Johnson, Chris Kiick, Ron Kirk, William Leake, Kathy Leonard, Melissa Mara Rose Maschler, Bonnie Miller, Nina Rehburg, Levi Rouse, Andrea Schwartz, Diana Schwarzbein, Stiles Watson, and Lisa Young. Special thanks to Kurt DouPonce of DogEaredDesign for bringing a pivotal moment of the story to life so vividly on the front cover, and heartfelt gratitude to my beloved wife Kathy for graciously enduring the birth pangs of the upcoming novels in this series.
 
 PART I
1
Jenna Wilkes pushed her glasses up on her nose to squint at the phony data on the screen in front of her, going through the motions expected of people analyzing real data. The junior researcher facing her from across the laboratory table looked up from his computer.
“Whatcha got, Jenna?” he probed, eyes locked upon her.
She fidgeted in her chair, chafing that she, a physicist, had been reduced to a thespian  pretending to do physics. When she returned his stare, the overhead fluorescent lights caught her glasses just so, making her eyes over-bright disks. Jenna opened her mouth as if to answer, then closed it, brushing her long red hair out of her face. She was a bad liar. Her gaze shifted back to the screen to better avoid the wordless accusation she had seen in his eyes. His resentment at being excluded from her zealously guarded work was palpable.
“Don’t make me come over there,” he urged with a bit more force than he intended.
 
“You
know
 
I don’t like sharing half 
-
 baked research with anyone, Bryn.” As she tu
rned in her chair, her eyes darted from Bryn to the screen to the massive titanium cube mounted  behind her on its stainless steel frame. The matte black surface of the cube, measuring more than a yard on a side, bristled with copper tubing, wires, meters, foil, and thermal
shielding. She didn’t know how long she could keep the device from being pried out of
her hands. Decoys, deceptions, and lies had their limits.
Bryn Zilcher smirked and called over his shoulder to a senior researcher. “Jenna’s her
usual t
alkative self again. Think she’ll ever get around to documenting anything she does around here?”
 The older scientist, Ron Bartleby, slowly swung his chair around to regard Bryn with
an upraised eyebrow. “You want to hide some secrets too, Bryn? Then discov
er something
of your own to hide. Leave the redhead alone.” Jenna cocked her head at her defender’s comment. She could count on Bartleby to
keep the newer researchers in line
 — 
another reason he had earned her trust over the last
 
three years. When Bartleby unexpectedly rose to approach her workstation, she knew her elaborate on-screen facade may need to come into play. She turned her monitor off and sorted through some papers. Bartleby came around her lab table and approached the room-dominating cube behind
her. She pretended he wasn’t there.
 
“Remember, Doctor Wilkes, a huge chunk of our division’s 2024– 
2025 fiscal year
 budget was sunk into your isolator system here,” Bartleby chided with undue formality,
 patting the titanium surface with a chubby hand.
“So I’m told,” she mumbled.
 
Across the table, Bryn’s eyes bored through her. He knew she had been working on the workstation just moments earlier. But Bartleby would assume Jenna’s computer was turned off. Bryn tried to signal Bartleby, pointing at Jenna’s scr 
een. Bartleby shifted his eyes and caught the gesture. So did Jenna.
“Done for the day?” Bartleby asked her.
 
“Yeah, just looking for a journal article I’ll need for tomorrow,” she replied.
Bartleby reached over her shoulder and turned her computer screen back on. Her eyes narrowed at Bryn, who shot back a smug grin. She turned in her chair and looked up at Bartleby, who was leaning across her to examine her results. The decoy would prove more effective if she could feign some convincing anger.
“Great prece
dent. Thanks a lot, Ron. Tomorrow, Bryn will be doing that. Thursday, the grad students will check my work, and Friday, the cleaning lady will be running error
regressions on my data.”
 
“Temper, temper,” Bartleby replied with a faint air of superiority, one
 she knew was rooted in experience, not condescension. Though technically not her superior, he was on much better terms with the lab managers than she.
“I’m not showing Bryn jack,” he added decisively. “Nice,” Bryn fumed. “Great intramural data sharing. World class.” “Hmm …” Bartleby dragged a finger down the column of data on her screen. “The same result as your other five prototypes.”
 She nodded, trying to push her chair out farther from him. Bartleby had no idea his older, heavier bulk was too far into her personal space. He kept his finger on the screen, his heavy-lidded eyes turning serious.
“Do you have any idea what it means?” he finally asked. “Without giving me your stock answer about it being too premature to draw any conclusions.”
 
“I don’t like
 
…” she began
 
“… to speculate,” he finished.
 Everything 
 
she does is pure speculation,” Bryn scoffed, knowing he wasn’t being kept at arm’s length from something trivial. “Our budget was torpedoed fabricating that mystery box.”
 

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