Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
083 Den of Thieves

083 Den of Thieves

Ratings: (0)|Views: 23|Likes:
Published by mcdozer
You never read about Jesus charging an entrance fee for His sermon on the mount, nor did He charge for a single one of His fish sandwiches (although I'm sure He could have raked in a fortune). It just wasn't in Him.

His credo was, "Freely ye have received, freely give," and in my opinion one of the greatest disgraces about Christendom is the machine of commerce that it has been for more than 16 centuries, with no improvement in sight anywhere (at least not voluntarily).
You never read about Jesus charging an entrance fee for His sermon on the mount, nor did He charge for a single one of His fish sandwiches (although I'm sure He could have raked in a fortune). It just wasn't in Him.

His credo was, "Freely ye have received, freely give," and in my opinion one of the greatest disgraces about Christendom is the machine of commerce that it has been for more than 16 centuries, with no improvement in sight anywhere (at least not voluntarily).

More info:

Published by: mcdozer on Oct 05, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as RTF, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

10/28/2009

pdf

text

original

 
Someone called me up some time ago and said, "You're the only dude on the Internet who'sgiving his music away for free."Well, maybe so. But I've got it from Someone Who I consider a greater and more reliableauthority on happiness than those John Denver referred to as "them money-hungry fools."You never read about Jesus charging an entrance fee for His sermon on the mount, nor did Hecharge for a single one of His fish sandwiches (although I'm sure He could have raked in afortune). It just wasn't in Him.His credo was, "Freely ye have received, freely give," and in my opinion one of the greatestdisgraces about Christendom is the machine of commerce that it has been for more than 16centuries, with no improvement in sight anywhere (at least not voluntarily).Thank God the Antichrist is going to appear some time to put an end to all of that with his "mark of the Beast," which will divide the wheat from the chaff, anyway.Jesus made it pretty plain what he thought of that commercialized hybrid of religion or spiritualitywhen He chased the vendors out of the temple. Imagine Him coming to the Vatican or your average drive-in church nowadays, or the mega-temples of the star evangelists. He probablyknows why he chose to appear 2000 years before things would get
really 
sick.Of course, nobody ever believes 
"Seeking first" the Kingdom would mean that that's what you'd invest the majority of your time andefforts in, instead of raking in all the cash you can.If you dedicate your time to serving Him and making sure that folks get His message (withouthaving to pay a fortune for it), then, He says, He will also take care of 
your 
needs.If you preach the Gospel and spread the Good News, then He'll make sure that you can also
. Of course, if you only preach to those who've heard the Gospel a thousand timesor more, and they're willing to pay a fortune for your sedating sermons that will assure them they'llescape the wrath of God for our collective selfishness and greed, then you'll have good cards asfar as thegod of this world is concerned, and
,but God may thinkdifferently about that kingdom you have built for yourself.It's called "modesty," a trait long forgotten and forlorn, and it has an even more recent hero thanJesus and His early followers, namely the Italian monkSt. Francis, who bucked the tide of thereligious supermarket of his day and decide to be content with little for a change.He saw a lot of misery, but I also believe that he knew more true happiness than most other folksin his day.One of the secrets of life is the art of not falling for 
every 
single temptation the Devil offers usalong the way; it's the art of saying "No, thank you!" every once in a while, "I already haveenough."I guess some people are starting to reap the first repercussion of the "never enough" attitude thathas been prevailing in our modern, enlightened Western society for the past decades. But will wereally have learned the lesson when and
IF 
the economy recovers?

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->