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Adsd Afcea Remarks as Prepared

Adsd Afcea Remarks as Prepared

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Published by samlagrone
Adsd Afcea Remarks as Prepared
Adsd Afcea Remarks as Prepared

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Published by: samlagrone on Feb 11, 2014
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09/18/2014

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EMBARGOED UNTIL DELIVERED - REMARKS AS PREPARED
1
ACTING DEPUTY SECRETARY OF DEFENSE CHRISTINE H. FOX PREPARED REMARKS AFCEA-NAVAL INSTITUTE, SAN DIEGO, CA FEBRUARY 11, 2014
Admiral Daly, thank you for that kind introduction and thanks to the Armed Force Communications and Electronics Association and to the Naval Institute for this invitation and opportunity.
It’s good to see so many valued colleagues and friends
 from the military leadership, the strategy and analyst community, as well as our industry partners. Since joining the Office of the Secretary of Defense more than four years ago
 – 
 first at CAPE, now as acting deputy defense secretary
 – 
 I have needed to be studiously neutral when it comes to the military services. But I
must admit that it’s
a special pleasure to address a Navy gathering. As you know, I spent most of my  professional life as an analyst working with the Navy and Marine Corps at the Center for Naval Analysis. At CNA I had many opportunities to ride ships, fly in naval aircraft and support integrated training exercises. And, rest assured articles in
 Proceedings
 still continue to get my attention! Spending any length of time with the Navy invariably means spending some time in San Diego
 – 
 where I lived for five years. S
o it’s a pleasure to be back,
especially at this time of year. Beyond the great weather and beautiful scenery, this city has a unique place in the history of America as a maritime nation; a city that continues to be a critical home to American sea power in all of its dimensions.
It’
s pretty extraordinary that one metropolitan area is home to where each year:
 
EMBARGOED UNTIL DELIVERED - REMARKS AS PREPARED
2
 
Thousands of young men and women
 – 
 still boys and girls in some cases
 – 
 are turned into United States Marines;
 
Tens of thousands of those Marines live and prepare for their next mission;
 
The next elite group of Navy SEALs are selected, vetted, and trained, and
 
Where much of the vaunted Pacific fleet is ported, maintained and deployed to show the flag and police the commons. I spent part of yesterday
seeing some of San Diego’s military assets and getting
 back in touch with my CNA roots
 – 
 visiting the Naval Air Station North Island, the  Navy Special Warfare Command, and U.S.S. Freedom.
So we’re here today to talk about maritime strategy – 
 how to make it work and, I would add, how to make it affordable. For the U.S. military as a whole this is a time of transition and corresponding uncertainty. The past decade has been dominated by the protracted land wars in the Middle East and Central Asia. Today, even as the fight continues in Afghanistan, we are in the process of transitioning to prepare the military to contend with a variety of interconnected threats in the 21
st
 Century. Recognizing this historic inflection point,
President Obama’
s defense strategic guidance issued two years ago contained several important priorities
 – 
 from counter-terrorism and counter-proliferation to strategic deterrence and sustaining
alliances. None was more relevant to America’s overall national interests – 
 security, economic, political
 – 
 
than what’s been called the “re
-
 balance” to Asia.
The re-balance, to be sure, is a whole-of-government concept, not just a military one
, and it is unfortunate that it’s been interpreted as such in many quarters. But
ther 
e’s no denying the importance of modernizing our military posture in the Asia
-
 
EMBARGOED UNTIL DELIVERED - REMARKS AS PREPARED
3
Pacific. Given that the Pacific is a predominantly maritime theater
 – 
 this has re-focused attention, resources, and strategic thi
nking in America’s sea services:
 
 
The Defense Department has already committed to focusing 60 percent of
the Navy’s fleet
 on the Pacific Command area of responsibility;
 
The Marines, as you know, began rotational deployments in Australia, the first of its kind since the Korean War; and
 
Up to four Littoral Combat Ships will deploy regularly to Singapore.
We’re
 updating the U.S. force posture in Japan by moving several thousand Marines from Okinawa to Guam and plans for relocating the naval-air station at Futenma are making progress. These efforts will all help maintain a well-distributed and politically sustainable force posture throughout the Pacific. So
there’s some
 positive movement in making the Asia re-balance a reality on the military side. But also a good deal of uncertainty on two major, interrelated fronts that I would like to discuss in my remaining time today. First, the strategic environment
 – 
 in particular the emerging challenges to U.S. air-sea dominance and the implications for how we think about Navy modernization  priorities. Second, the fiscal uncertainty and continued budget austerity which, as my remarks will make clear, require that we make tough and far-sighted choices now in order to achieve a ready and modern force in the future. With respect to the geo-strategic environme
nt in the Pacific there’s no avoiding the
tremendous impact of the rise of China. U.S. defense leaders are frequently asked if our re-
 balance is really all about China. In reality it’s not about any one

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