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The Daily Tar Heel for Feb. 12, 2014

The Daily Tar Heel for Feb. 12, 2014

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The print edition for Feb. 12, 2014
The print edition for Feb. 12, 2014

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Serving UNC students and the University community since 1893
Rah-rah, Car’lina-’lina! Go to Hell, Duke!
“I’M A TAR HEEL BORN”
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
dailytarheel.com
Volume 121, Issue 150
TURN TO PAGE 3 FOR ELECTION COVERAGE
DTH FILE/CHRIS CONWAY
Junior James Michael McAdoo averages 15 points per game, a drastic change from six points as a freshman.
16-7 6-4 ACC
|
19-5 8-3 ACC
|
62.4
PercentMade
Average Points Per Game3-Point Percentage17
Per GameAverage
Free ThrowsLeading Scorer
(points per game)
Lead Rebounder
(rebounds per game)
73.9
Percent Made
Average Rebounds Per GameAverage Turnovers Per Game
James McAdooMarcus PaigeJabari ParkerJabari Parker
132 104
UNC-Duke Series
COMPILED BY: MIKE LANANNADTH/DANIEL ULYSSES LOCKWOOD
17.5
Per GameAverage
McAdoo shuts out the noise
The forward ignores his critics
By Brooke Pryor
Senior Writer
James Michael McAdoo doesn’t care  what you think.He was crowned by USA Basketball  before stepping foot on a college court, heralded as the next savior of North Carolina basketball.But lust quickly turned to disgust, and  just as quickly as he was worshipped, he  was scorned by fans and scrutinized by analysts.Chants of ‘overrated’ echo through hostile arenas, and hushed tones of doubt infiltrate the crowd on his home turf.Draft experts slashed his worth from a top-three pick to second round at best in three years.But McAdoo can’t hear any of it.He blocks it out. He has to.It’s the only way to stay sane and preserve the fleeting moments of a child-hood rapidly evaporating as a profes-sional career looms.He maintains a private life — no Twitter, private Instagram, restricted Facebook.People see only the McAdoo that he  wants them to see, which, until recently,  was a stone-faced, emotionless power for- ward. He’s transformed beneath their laser-like gaze. From barely averaging six points a game in his freshman year to becoming a leader for UNC on and off the court.Coming into tonight’s game against Duke, McAdoo has all but left his former self behind. He’s averaging 15 points a game and playing with an intensity that embodies a sense of urgency coach Roy  Williams begs from his players.But there’s more to him than steals and dunks, botched free throws and silky close-range jump shots.He’s a dog lover who owns a cat. He’s a goofball, known around the team for his corny jokes. He’s a compassionate man, grounded in his faith.But above all else, he’s a 21-year-old kid just playing a game he loves.
A harsh spotlight
 A few weeks before this past Late Night with Roy, McAdoo found a kitten roaming outside the Smith Center.The self-proclaimed dog person couldn’t leave something so vulnerable to fend for itself, so he took her home to the house he shares with teammates Luke Davis and Desmond Hubert. After a few visits to the veterinarian, the big man with four names gave the kitten three of her own.Macy Bernard McAdoo.“I’ll tell you right now,” he said. “I hate kittens. I hate cats. I’m a dog person until I die, but I have a heart, plus it got me points with my girlfriend.
SEE
MCADOO,
PAGE 5
DTH FILE/CHELSEY ALLDER
J.P. Tokoto (13) attempts to block Olivier Hanlan’s (21) layup on Jan. 18, 2014 in the game against Boston College.
Tar Heels prepare for rivalry battle
By Michael Lananna
Sports Editor
Sophomore J.P. Tokoto has admittedly limited experience in the North Carolina-Duke rivalry.Last year, he played a combined 10 min-utes between the two games the bitter rivals played. Still, he’s taken it upon himself to prepare the team’s freshmen for tonight’s rivalry rekindling at the Smith Center.“I’m pretty much just telling them to look at it like it’s another game,” Tokoto said.But does he buy his own advice?“No,” he said, laughing. “I don’t. Not me. But I feel like that would help them out mentally.The fact is, UNC-Duke has never been just another game, and it won’t be just another game tonight.It’s a clash of near opposites. Duke (19-5, 8-3 ACC) enters with the upper hand, ranked No. 8 in the country and having won seven of its last nine meetings with the Tar Heels. Unranked UNC (16-7, 6-4 ACC), in contrast, is a team on the rise, coming off five straight  wins — albeit against the ACC’s lesser compe-
UNC will host Duke tonight after winning five straight games.
Ticket process in place despite weather
By Sarah Chaney andDaniel Schere
Assistant University Editors
Despite ongoing concerns about ticket randomization and potential inclement  weather, UNC officials said today’s game  between UNC and Duke University is not likely to be impacted.Tim Sabo, assistant athletic director for ticket operations, said the potential for adverse weather would not affect the ran-domization process.“The plan will move forward as is,” he said in an email. “If anything changes, we’ll certainly work with the (Carolina Athletics  Association) and utilize as many communi-cation channels as possible to get the word out to students.UNC Department of Public Safety Spokesman Randy Young said the University has been in contact with the ath-letic department and Chapel Hill Transit to gauge the possible impact of weather on the game.Chapel Hill Transit Assistant Director Brian Litchfield said all bus service is
UNC officials have opted to use the same ticketing procedures.
SEE
TICKETS,
PAGE 5SEE
DUKE,
PAGE 5
 GO HEELS
 
 
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TODAY
UNC men’s basketball vs. Duke:
 Cheer on the Tar Heels as they take on the Blue Devils. If you weren’t selected in the student lottery to receive tickets, available seats will be filled by students at the start of the game. Students may enter the stand-by line no earlier than one and half hours before tip-off.
Time:
 9 p.m. - 11 p.m.
Location:
 Dean Smith Center
Duke-UNC Viewing Party:
 Didn’t land a ticket to the big game against the Duke Blue Devils? The Order of the Bell  Tower has got you covered with its game viewing part. You can pick up tickets at the door for $7 or purchase them in the Pit for $5.
Time:
 8:30 p.m.
Location:
 Varsity Theatre
THURSDAY
Orgasm? Yes, Please!:
Want to learn how to have better, healthy, fun and communicative sex? This program focuses on healthy sexuality and cultivat-ing healthy relationships while combining humor. Learn about orgasms and enter a raffle to win a free vibrator in a raffle. Pre-sented in part by Project Dinah, Interactive Theater Carolina and Student Wellness.
Time:
 7 p.m. - 9 p.m.
Location:
 Student Union, Great Hall
Make Your Own Valentine:
Get crafty while making a card for your special Valentine. Bull’s Head Bookshop will supply all the construction paper hearts and googly eyes you need. It will also be held Friday. Free.
Time:
 10 a.m. - 8 p.m.
Location:
 Bull’s Head Bookshop
NOTED.
Good news for an American pop-ulation already battling heart disease and obesity: You can now get your Twinkies at up to 40 percent less than grocery store prices thanks to Big Lots.Mhmm, mmm. Nothing screams capi-talism more than manufactured snack cakes at a reduced price.
QUOTED.
“There’s not a feeling that you have to be better than one another, physi-cally. We’re humans, we have scars, we have what we have … it’s learning to love and accept that.— Pastor Allen Parker, who allows nude  worship at White Tail Chapel in Virginia. Love is love. Naked is naked.
M
adame Tussauds wax museum has officially retired its  wax figure of Justin Bieber — but it’s not his recent trou- bles with the law that are to blame. Leave it to crazed fans to excessively grope the figure beyond repair.  All the groping and fondling has taken its toll on waxy Bieber, and despite regular maintenance, the masterpiece upholding all that is mid-dle school and bad decisions no longer does a justice to the real person. The museum said it hopes to have a ‘grown-up’ version of Bieber in the museum soon, and the world weeps.  Also, disclaimer: The non-wax Justin Bieber has not been retired from,  well, whatever it is he’s doing right now. Sorry to disappoint.
Bieber wax figure meltdown
From staff and wire reports
DAILY DOSE
 Someone broke and entered and committed lar-ceny at Los Potrillos restau-rant at 220 W. Rosemary St.  between midnight and 8 a.m. Monday, according to Chapel Hill police reports.The person pried open the door to the restuarant, causing damage to the door estimated at $250, damage to an office door estimated at $200, damage to a cash reg-ister draw estimated at $400 damage to wires estimated at $300 and damage to an alarm motion sensor estimat-ed at $200, reports state.The person also stole $170 in cash, a safe valued at $350, a computer valued at $500 and a security system control  box valued at $4,000, reports state.
 Someone committed  vehicular breaking and enter-ing and damaged property at 8 Clark Court between 10 a.m. and 6:15 p.m. Monday, according to Chapel Hill police reports.The person threw a rock through a car window, caus-ing damage estimated at $200, reports state.
 Someone abandoned a  bicycle valued at $50 at 127 E. Franklin St. at 12:10 p.m. Monday, according to Chapel Hill police reports.
 Someone committed simple assault at a restaurant at 107 N. Columbia St. at 5:08 p.m. Monday, according to Chapel Hill police reports.The person threw a drink on someone else, reports state.
 Someone trespassed at a restuarant at 100 W. Franklin St. at 6:14 p.m. Monday, according to Chapel Hill police reports.The person banged on the  window of Qdoba and would not stop, reports state.
To make a calendar submission, email calendar@dailytarheel.com. Please include the date of the event in the subject line, and attach a photo if you wish. Events will be published in the newspaper on either the day or the day before they take place.
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
“Smart Leaders, Smarter Teams” (Lecture):
Roger Schwarz, an international leader-ship consultant and former School of Government professor will give a lecture on the topic of “Smart Leaders, Smarter Teams,” the title of his recent book. Free.
Time:
 3:30 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Location:
 Medical Biomolecular Research Building, Room 2204
“We Love Valentines” Night:
  Take part in a “Love in the Gal-leries” scavenger hunt and make your own Valentines.
Time:
 5 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Location:
 Ackland Art Museum
POLICE LOG
 
News
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
The Daily Tar Heel
2
BURGERS FOR A BENEFIT
F
reshmen Molly High (left) and Majdoulyne Lavoie were at Al’s Burger Shack on Franklin Street on Tuesday night for Kappa Delta’s benefit night for their annual Shamrock N’ Run 5K supporting Prevent Child Abuse America.
DTH/ZACH ALDRIDGE
CORRECTIONS
• The Daily Tar Heel reports any inaccurate information published as soon as the error is discovered.• Editorial corrections will be printed on this page. Errors committed on the Opinion Page have corrections
printed on that page. Corrections also are noted in the online versions of our stories.
• Contact Managing Editor Cammie Bellamy at managing.editor@dailytarheel.com with issues about this policy.
 Like us at facebook.com/dailytarheelFollow us on Twitter @dailytarheel 
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  A Spanish Language Immersion Program will be offered at UNC-Chapel Hill in summer 2014. Students will take language classes and extend their language learning through cultural and social activities. The immersion program will be in first summer session May 13 - June 17, 2014. In the Spanish program, students will be enrolled in both SPAN 101 and SPAN 102 and earn 6 credit hours.
  An application is required. The program will be limited to 20 students.
 For more information and how to apply, go to http://languageimmersion.web.unc.edu
 Immerse yourself in
Spanish this summer
  without leaving campus!
 
News
Wednesday, February 12, 2014
The Daily Tar Heel
3
THEN THERE WERE
2
DTH/MELISSA KEY
 There will be a runoff election on Tuesday, Feb. 18 between Student Body President candidates Emilio Vicente (left) and Andrew Powell.
By Sarah Moseley
Staff Writer
Student transcripts could look a little different next year after the implementation of contextual grading and the new XF grade.The new grading system would require that an “X” is added to an “F” grade when a student is convicted of violating the Honor Code.The “X” notation may be removed only if the student responsible participates in an ethics course which proves their renewed understand-ing of academic integrity, said Dean of Students Jonathan Sauls. However, making the effort to remove the “X” is completely voluntary.Sauls said the XF grade will improve the honor system while allowing students to gain a better understanding of the University’s academic stan-dards. Although the proposal is awaiting formal approval by the Faculty Council and Chancellor Carol Folt, Sauls said he is confident it will pass.The notation is used by a number of other schools, Sauls said, but not all of those institu-tions allow students the opportunity to remove the “X” from their transcript.“We thought it was important to have that redemptive quality,” Sauls said. “There’s an educa-tive component for students to learn and grow from mistakes.The XF grade is one of several methods UNC is using to change its approach to academic con-duct. UNC will also implement contextual grad-ing in the fall that will show how well a student did in a course compared to their classmates.Theresa Raphael-Grimm, chairwoman of the educational policy committee, said contextual grading will tell graduate schools more about an individual’s academic achievement while also curbing grade inflation over time.The committee recently increased the cutoff GPA for the Honors Program because grade infla -tion has increased so much over the last 20 years, Raphael-Grimm said.“I don’t think grade inflation is advantageous to students,” she said. “I think it really diminishes  what an A means.Lawrence Mur’ray, director of the undergraduate  business program, said there are many factors that go into evaluating applicants, but that contextual transcripts will be an additional factor the Kenan-Flagler Business School uses in its assessments.“It’s rare that one data point or single piece of information is enough to impact a student’s chances at receiving a favorable admissions deci-sion,” Mur’ray said.Undergraduate Student Attorney General Anna Sturkey said the Office of Student Conduct will  work to educate students about these changes.They are working to create a reader-friendly guide to explain the changes, which will be widely distributed next year, along with an updated module for freshmen.Sauls said it was necessary that these academic changes happened in concert with each other.“It’s part of a greater whole,” he said. “I don’t know if all these changes would have the same support if they were done in a vacuum.”
university@dailytarheel.com
 Vicente and Powell will compete in a runoff next week 
Election Winners
Students were elected to various positions within University organizations Tuesday night. All runoff elections will be held on Feb. 18:
Jessie Nerkowski was elected President of the Carolina Athletic Association
Shelby Eden Dawkins was elected President of the Graduate and Profes-sional School Association
 There will be a runoff election for Senior Class Officers between the pair Rachel Gentry and Ahmad Saad and the pair Sasha Seymore and Alexis White
 
 There will be a runoff election between Austin Glock Andrews and Taylor Bates for the President of the Residence Hall Association
By Kate Albers, Bradley Saacksand Langston Taylor
Staff Writers
The votes are in, but the campaign con-tinues. Student body president candidates Emilio Vicente and Andrew Powell will compete in a runoff election on Tuesday, Feb. 18, the UNC Board of Elections announced after no candidate received the majority of the votes. Vicente led all can-didates with 41.08 per-cent of the vote, with Powell coming in sec-ond with 28.4 percent of the vote.“Honestly, I’m still in shock,” Vicente said.He expressed respect for the other candidates and how they handled the elec-tion.“It’s been really clean,” Vicente said. “I  want to commend all of the candidates, especially Winston and Nikita.Powell said he was surprised by the out-come.“I feel very fortunate to have had this outcome and am certainly very excited to move forward,” he said.Powell said he will continue to try to reach as many students as possible in preparation for next week’s election. He also added that he has a lot of respect for fellow candidates Nikita Shamdasani and  Winston Howes.“I’ll certainly be sitting down with Nikita and Winston both,” he said. “I would love to incorporate some of their ideas in our strat-egy going forward.”Some 5,475 students voted in this year’s election, down from 5,691 votes last year,  but it was still more than the record low of 4,507 in the 2012 election.The voting system did experience prob-lems with registering votes for the senior class president election. Robert Windsor, chairman of the Board of Elections, said some current seniors were able to vote for the office.“When we corrected the problem this morning, only about 100 people had voted for senior class officers at that point,” he said.He said they made sure the results were not changed by the extra votes.Powell said it was difficult for him to submit his own vote.“I actually had trouble voting. I had to submit a secondary form initially,” he said. Vicente said he did not yet know if he  would campaign any differently this week.“I came in without any expectations,” he said, and added that he was excited to relax Tuesday night.“I’m still in awe that I’ve received a lot of coverage,” Vicente said, though he stressed he remains focused on UNC.Shamdasani came in third, getting 20.29 percent of the votes. She said she was dis-appointed, but still hopeful for next year.“There will be a great student body pres-ident,” Shamdasani said.She said she would not able to endorse a candidate until she had a chance to sit down with them both.Howes collected the remaining 10.23 percent of the vote and said he was pre-pared for all possible outcomes.“I think it’ll be interesting seeing  Andrew and Emilio go at it,” he said. “Because of his team and (its) dedication
DTH/JAY PETERKIN
Don Jose Tienda Mexicana is moving away from its old location by the intersec-tion of Rosemary and Main Street in Carrboro to a new location in Chapel Hill.
By Bob Bryan
Staff Writer
 After 10 years at the intersec-tion of Rosemary and Main Streets in Carrboro, Don Jose Tienda Mexicana has moved to a new loca-tion in Chapel Hill.The store offers a variety of goods from Hispanic groceries to electron-ics. It also has a lunch counter pro- viding Mexican taqueria fare.Gloria Gonzalez owned the store  before the move, but sold it to her  brother after the rent increased.“The rent doubled, I just couldn’t afford it,” said Gonzalez.Bill Dimos, the landlord of the space Don Jose formerly occupied, said the increase was necessary to keep up with market prices in the area. He said he informed Gonzalez her rent would go up when the lease expired in six months.“It had been the same rent for the last 10 years,” Dimos said.“I told her I would release her from her lease if she needed to be released early.”Dimos said he conducted his own market research of the area, which revealed that nearby commercial rents reached as high as $30 per square foot.“It had been 10 years, I hadn’t even done a cost of living increase,  which I was entitled to do,” he said. “I offered to assist her in any way she needed.”
Universities replicate Carolina Counts
By Michelle Neeley
Staff Writer
 A UNC-CH program has been saving the University millions — and it’s now getting attention from the state legislature. A December report, conducted  by the N.C. General Assembly’s Program Evaluation Division, point-ed to UNC-CH’s Carolina Counts as the closest example in the system of a comprehensive approach to opera-tional efficiency.Carolina Counts, which was initi-ated by former UNC-CH Chancellor Holden Thorp, identifies wasteful administrative costs, and shifts fund-ing to research, faculty and students, said program director Mike Patil.Patil said the program has saved the University more than $200 mil-lion in its four years so far.Nearly half a billion dollars has  been erased from state funding for the system since 2011, and all system schools are pressed to maintain aca-demic quality with less money.Pam Taylor, a principal program evaluator for a division of the N.C. General Assembly, said researchers  were interested in seeing how UNC-system schools were responding to shrinking budgets. “The UNC system has embarked on many operational efficiency efforts at the system-wide level — we are really looking at the wide level efforts and how well they are doing,” she said.The report found that Carolina Counts cuts funding to non-core functions of the university, including human resources and accounting.Researchers visited eight of the 17 UNC-system schools to see mea -sures the schools had already imple-mented, Taylor said.UNC-CH’s Carolina Counts program stood out to researchers  because it was the only one that researchers felt accurately docu-mented its savings, she said.Other system schools are working to improve operational efficiency.For instance, UNC-Wilmington  Vice Chancellor of Business Affairs Charles Maimone said UNC-W’s financial rating was changed from stable to positive after an evaluation last month. He said UNC-W has combined departments and worked to maxi-mize the use of staff time.“We have re-shaped ourselves so we can keep all of our resources focused on the academic core of our institution,” Maimone said.But system-wide efforts are a pri-ority for the program evaluators.“We are really looking at the sys-tem-wide level efforts and and how  well they were doing,” Taylor said.The system Board of Governors’ strategic plan identifies several cost-cutting efforts across the system.Patil said the success of expand-ing the Carolina Counts program  would depend on the participation and enthusiasm of system faculty. He said faculty should be given the option to opt in to the program.“If you mandate it, it kind of  becomes someone else’s program,” he said. “You’re reluctant to do it.”
state@dailytarheel.com
Eddie Murray, an employee of  Wings Over Chapel Hill, a restau-rant located next to the previous Don Jose location, sees it as a part of a persistent problem.“To me it’s an example of classic gentrification,” Murray said. “Don Jose has been there longer than I’ve  been working here, but I’m sure there is something that could go there that would make more money.Don Jose’s new location on South Merritt Mill Road faces an alley beside Al’s Garage. Despite  being less visible than the spot on Rosemary Street, Gonzalez thinks that customers will follow the store to its new location.“Service is our main thing, we treat people well and that gets them to come back,” Gonzalez said.Jared Fruth, an employee at Jesse’s Coffee and Bar across from the old location, feared that the move might make it harder for the store to draw new customers.“They’re not centrally located any -more, so fewer people are likely to stumble across the store,” Fruth said.Even though the new space is smaller, Gonzalez said that Don Jose still offers nearly everything that the previous location had, including prepared food.“We can’t do haircuts anymore,  but that’s about the only thing dif-ferent,” said Gonzalez.Despite leaving the location that  was home to the store for more than a decade, Gonzalez is hopeful for the future.“There are always going to  be changes, but that happens,Gonzalez said.“We just got to keep going and stay in business however we can.”
city@dailytarheel.com
A new grade of XF will appear when students violate the Honor Code.The Hispanic goods store will move to Chapel Hill after 10 years in Carrboro. UNC’s cost savings program has been praised by N.C. state officials.
Don Jose Tienda Mexicana  leaves Carrboro location
Transcripts to denote cheating
and integrity — I would endorse Powell at this point.”Despite the loss, Howes said he plans to  work with whatever administration wins to create openUNC, the app his campaign was centered on.Last year, current Student Body President Christy Lambden defeated Will Lindsey in a runoff, garnering 55 percent of the vote after only receiving 22 percent of the vote in the original election.
 Staff writers Jane Wester and Carolyn  Ebeling contributed to the reporting.university@dailytarheel.com
DTH/LA’MON JOHNSON
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