Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword or section
Like this
42Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Mils and MOA; A Tactical Shooters Guide

Mils and MOA; A Tactical Shooters Guide

Ratings:

4.92

(13)
|Views: 11,190|Likes:
Published by Bob Simeone
Describes in detail exactly what "mils" and "moa" are and how to derive the "distance equations" involving them. For the Tactical Shooter.
Describes in detail exactly what "mils" and "moa" are and how to derive the "distance equations" involving them. For the Tactical Shooter.

More info:

Published by: Bob Simeone on Feb 13, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/01/2015

pdf

text

original

 
Mils/MOA &The Range Estimation Equations
An In-Depth Study for Shooters
R
OBERT
 J. S
IMEONE
2nd Edition
 January 30, 2015
Overview
Many shooters use scopes that have reticles etched in mils or MOAto take measurements of targets. They then input those measurementsinto simple equations to estimate the distances to those targets. Based
on those estimated distances, they then adjust their scopes’ reticles
using adjustment controls also calibrated in mils or MOA.
But what exactly is a mil or a MOA and how did they derivethe range estimation equations? This paper will try to answer those
questions so that shooters will have a better understanding of mils andMOA and the range estimation equations. Hopefully you will become
a better-educated and knowledgeable shooter.
 
Contents
1 Introduction 12 Mils 13 The Mil Range Estimation Equation 144 Minute of Angle (MOA) 215 MOA Range Estimation Equation 216 Shooter Minute of Angle (S-MOA) 327 Conversion Between Units 368 Distance Equations 399 Quick Reference Guide 4110 Comparison of Angles 4211 The Big Picture 4312 Acknowledgements 44
 
1 Introduction
Many shooters use scopes that have reticles etched in mils or MOA totake measurements of targets. They then input those measurements intosimple equations to estimate the distances to those targets. Based on those
estimated distances, they then adjust their scopes’ reticles using adjustmentcontrols also calibrated in mils or MOA. But what exactly is a mil or a MOAand how did they derive the range estimation equations? This paper will tryto answer those questions so that shooters will have a better understanding
of mils and MOA and the range estimation equations. Hopefully you will
 become a better-educated and knowledgeable shooter.
Note: The discussions that follow sometimes involve math and math equations.
 Although simple, most times they are not a necessary requirement for the under-
standing of the subject. Therefore, often when math comes into the discussion, I will
offer the option of skipping over that part by separating the math section with two
bold black lines (as shown above and below) and give you a page number and an
(
)
to indicate where you can pick up the subject matter again.
2 Mils
Mils have been used for many years as a mathematical tool to estimate the
distance to targets. Used early on by artillery units, naval gunfire units, and
most recently by snipers, they are a valuable tool in estimating distances
for accurate shots. But many people are unfamiliar with the term “mil”. So,
what is a mil?
When shooters use the term “mil”, what they are really talking about is
a shortened form of the word milliradian, which is a mathematical unit of 
angular measurement of a circle. The “Milli” part of the word “milliradian”
is Latin and it means a thousandth (1/1,000th). For example, a millimeter isone one-thousandth (1/1000th) of a meter. In the same manner, a milliradian
(usually shortened to just “mil”) is one thousandth (1/1000th) of a radian.
So what is a radian? A radian is an angle based on the properties of acircle. To use the natural physical properties of a circle to define what aradian is: (1) make a circle of any size, (2) superimpose the radius of the
circle onto the circumference of the circle (below).1

Activity (42)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
sdavis8873 liked this
Tom Stephens liked this
brianmaack liked this
SonOfAdamm liked this
drruthsnemesis liked this
Antonio Santana liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->