Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Christian Philanthropist.

The Christian Philanthropist.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 26|Likes:
Published by glennpease
BY THE VERY REV. DR. BRADLEY.

DEAN OF WESTMINSTER.
Preached in Westminster Abbey, Oct, II, 1885.

" For he shall deliver the poor when hecrieth, the needy also, and him that hath no helper. He shall be favorable to the simple and needy, and shall preserve the souls of the poor. He shall deliver their souls from falsehood and wrong, and dear shall their blood be in his sight." — PsALM lxx. 12 — 14.
BY THE VERY REV. DR. BRADLEY.

DEAN OF WESTMINSTER.
Preached in Westminster Abbey, Oct, II, 1885.

" For he shall deliver the poor when hecrieth, the needy also, and him that hath no helper. He shall be favorable to the simple and needy, and shall preserve the souls of the poor. He shall deliver their souls from falsehood and wrong, and dear shall their blood be in his sight." — PsALM lxx. 12 — 14.

More info:

Published by: glennpease on Feb 15, 2014
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/15/2014

pdf

text

original

 
THE CHRISTIAN PHILANTHROPIST. THE EARL OF SHAFTESBURY. IN MEMORIAM. BY THE VERY REV. DR. BRADLEY. DEAN OF WESTMINSTER. Preached in Westminster Abbey, Oct, II, 1885. " For he shall deliver the poor when hecrieth, the needy also, and him that hath no helper. He shall be favorable to the simple and needy, and shall preserve the souls of the poor. He shall deliver their souls from falsehood and wrong, and dear shall their blood be in his sight." — PsALM lxx. 12 — 14. You will not wonder that these verses have come unbidden to me as I prepared to speak to you to-day. I have read them to you in the form in which they have rung in my own ears during the week that is past in the familiar and remembered rhythm of our Prayer-book version. One touch has been added to their significance by our last revision, which, by substituting in the 13th verse, the words, "he shall have pity on," for " he shall be favorable to," has given a fresh emphasis to the note of tenderness and compassion which runs through one of the most stately and most stirring hymns of these ancient hymns of Israel. It is a Psalm that from the first word to the very last may well haunt men's ears and linger in their memories. I read but lately the remarks of a critic who pronounces that it falls below the general level of Hebrew poetry. He tells us that this rhyme is borrowed from a prophet, that it is an echo from
1
 
the book of Job, above all, that the reiterated references to the poor, the oppressed, the helpless, the needy, recur in it with what he calls a weari-some monotony. I have no fear that any one before me who has read the Psalm will indorse this judgment. What is its subject ? We might say that it read almost like a coronation oath, for it spoke of a monarch himself, and a monarch's son who is to rule far and wide over vast re-gions, over tributary kings, and over the hearts of men. • In its opening 230 The Christian Philanthropist. words it invokes for this king the divine and royal gift of righteousness, " Give the king thy judgments," — thy justice, that is — " O, God, and thy righteousness unto the king's son." And it pictures in glowing ac-cents of promise or of aspiration the bright perspective of a golden age, of a changed and prosperous world, of a universal dominion and an im-perishable name. But note that the title of this unmeasured greatness and of this unbounding happiness is to rest on righteousness; on that care for justice that is inherent in our race — above all, on that aspect of justice so truly prized, then, as now, in Eastern lands, the righteous-ness that turns an attentive ear to the voice of those who have no gifts to lavish, no bribes to tender, no officials or favorites to plead their cause. " All kings shall fall down before him," we read, " all nations shall do him servxe. For he shall deliver the poor when he crieth ; the needy also, and him that hath no helper. He shall deliver their souls from
2
 
falsehood and wrong, and dear shall their blood be in his sight." We may call it a coronation oath ; but its accents will touch a fiber in human hearts as long, in its own language, as the sun and moon endure — in new republics and in ancient monarchies, wherever there are wants that need a helper, wherever there are yearnings deep down in unsatisfied hearts for a happier world. Do any here remember a page in which it was quoted nearly forty years ago almost at full length by the then young Charles Kingsley, and placed by him as the last utterance on dying lips ? We need not stop to ask which of the long roll of the kings of Palestine, famous or forgotten, called forth such an immortal strain. An inscription, added, it may well be, ages later, identifies its author, or, as some would say, its subject with Solomon. We turn away unsatisfied, its aspirations rise too high above the hard experience of the Hebrew monarchy. It reads rather like a twin picture to that revealed to later prophet-poet of the ideal king who ought to come, who would love righteousness and hate iniquity, who " shall not judge after the sight of his eyes, neither reprove after the hearing of his ears ; but with righteousness shall he judge the poor, and reprove with equity for the meek of the earth," whose claim to rule over the hearts of men should rest not on birth, or conquest, or power, or re-sources, but on a Divine beneficence, and righteousness, and tenderness, and compassion. We may all feel that if the reign of Solomon in any
3

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->