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Sanctification.

Sanctification.

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Published by glennpease
BY THE RIGHT REV. DR. TEMPLE,

LORD BISHOP OF LONDON.
Preachect in St. PauFs Cathedral Sunday, February 7, 1886.

ST. JOHN XVII, 19.
"And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through
the truth."
BY THE RIGHT REV. DR. TEMPLE,

LORD BISHOP OF LONDON.
Preachect in St. PauFs Cathedral Sunday, February 7, 1886.

ST. JOHN XVII, 19.
"And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through
the truth."

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Published by: glennpease on Feb 15, 2014
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SANCTIFICATION. BY THE RIGHT REV. DR. TEMPLE, LORD BISHOP OF LONDON. Preachect in St. PauFs Cathedral Sunday, February 7, 1886. ST. JOHN XVII, 19. "And for their sakes I sanctify myself, that they also might be sanctified through the truth." The santification of which our Lord speaks in this place is the consecra-tion of the whole creature, of the whole being, to the spiritual purpose of the service of our heavenly Father. To give up everything in order that His will may be accomplished, to do that will to the very full — that is the perfect sanctification of all things. And of course this sanctification in itself, does not necessarily imply any change in the thing that is sanctified. If we think of things that stand at the lowest end, and of things that stand at the highest end of being, there is no change at all in the consecration of either to the fulfilment of the will of God. When Moses consecrated the Tabernacle, when he hallowed all the vessels thereof, and all the accesso-ries, when he consecrated the altar and the font, when he consecrated the garments of the priests, all these things remained just what they were be-fore, and the only difference was in the purpose to which they were as-signed. When we consecrate a church or consecrate a churchyard we dedi-
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cate either the one or the other to a solemn spiritual purpose, we dedicate either the one or the other to our heavenly Father ; but neither the one nor the other is affected by what we have done ; the purpose for which each is used is changed from what it otherwise would have been, but the thing itself remains the same. And as this is the case with that which stands lowest, so also is the same the case with that which stands highest. When the Almighty Son of God sanctifies Himself to do His heavenly Father's 4 26 Sanctification. will, there is no change in Him ; His absolute holiness remains what it was before ; He is still Himself, there is no difference because of the consecra-tion. And so, in either case, the consecration does not necessarily carry with it anything affecting that which is consecrated. But when we think of all that stands between these, when we think of the consecration of a finite creature, or, still more, of a finite creature intelligent and possessed of will, and yet with evil in that will, it is plain that the consecration must, of necessity, imply a real change in the thing that is consecrated. If there is evil, that evil cannot be dedicated to God; if there is anything which hinders the service of our Father, that hindrance must be taken away. That which is to be offered must be cleansed in the very act of offering, or else it cannot be offered at all ; and only in proportion as it is cleansed is it capable of being thus sanctified ; and the sanctification necessarily implies,
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not only a surrender of everything to God, but the purification which is necessary to make the surrender possible. The sanctifying of the disciple will, necessarily, so far differ from the sanctifying of the Divine Master that the disciple must pass through changes — changes affecting the very depths and essence of his nature before the sanctification can be complete. And so there is, in this way, a difference between the sanctification of the Lord and the sanctification of every one that belongs to the Lord ; and yet, even here, there is something that brings them near together. For although the sanctification implies no change in our Lord's own original personality, although He knew no sin, and there was no necessity for Him to be cleansed, yet He, too, partook of the infirmity of our nature ; and though there was not a change of the same kind, yet in His sanctification, also, there was involved a progress ; there was a rising from the lower to the higher ; there was that development of His human nature which is necessary in order that He might be entirely human. And so we are not only told in the beginning of His life that "He grew in stature and in favour with God and man," but we are told that in the end of His life He " learned obedience through the things that He suffered " — that "He was made perfect by suffering. " And when we think of the wonderful revelation in the Garden of Gethsemane, when the weakness of His humanity was laid bare for a few of His disciples to behold ; when it was known that He, too, shared in the eternal struggle which marks of neces-sity the spiritual life of man ; when He, too, had to resist temptation and not cast it aside as He had done before, but to contend with it, pouring
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