Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Divine Condescension, Human Exaltation.

Divine Condescension, Human Exaltation.

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1|Likes:
Published by GLENN DALE PEASE
REV. JOHN HARRIS, D.D.

The condescension of God, as already traced in its
downward stages, was not ostentation and display. It
could not fail to be productive of certain effects ; for
as surely as the natural operation of his justice would
have tended to destroy, so certainly the operation of
his love would have a tendency to save. And it could
not be otherwise than that these restorative effects should
be commensurate with the degree of condescension
which he exercised ; they would correspond in meas-
ure as well as in kind.
REV. JOHN HARRIS, D.D.

The condescension of God, as already traced in its
downward stages, was not ostentation and display. It
could not fail to be productive of certain effects ; for
as surely as the natural operation of his justice would
have tended to destroy, so certainly the operation of
his love would have a tendency to save. And it could
not be otherwise than that these restorative effects should
be commensurate with the degree of condescension
which he exercised ; they would correspond in meas-
ure as well as in kind.

More info:

Published by: GLENN DALE PEASE on Feb 16, 2014
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/16/2014

pdf

text

original

 
DIVINE CONDESCENSION, HUMAN EXALTATION. REV. JOHN HARRIS, D.D.The condescension of God, as already traced in its downward stages, was not ostentation and display. It could not fail to be productive of certain effects ; for as surely as the natural operation of his justice would have tended to destroy, so certainly the operation of his love would have a tendency to save. And it could not be otherwise than that these restorative effects should be commensurate with the degree of condescension which he exercised ; they would correspond in meas-ure as well as in kind. Accordingly, we find that this exact correspondence obtains : He stooped to earth that we might be raised to heaven ; he partook of our human nature that we might be made partakers of his divine ; he died an ignominious death that we might live a glorified and eternal life. In glancing at the pinnacle of distinction to which man is raised, let us mark two or three of the more elevated stages in the ascending scale. The lowest to which we shall allude is that of a servant of the most high God. From being the slaves of sin, he advances us into his high and holy service. He has no need of our services, for he is self-sufficient, and could accom-
1
 
plish every thing by the word of his power ; or if he chose to surround himself with obedient servants, as a thing becoming his majesty and state, he might have taken them all from the inhabitants of the heavenly world.* They have never revolted from him, never * If the writer mistake not, there is a passage somewhere in the celebrated Howe's works, the scope of which bears a resemblance to this paragraph. AN ESSAY. 231 abused his goodness, nor renounced his authority, as we have done ; but have ever counted it their highest honour to adore and serve him. How astonishing is it, then, that he should come to seek for servants in this sinful world ! that he should call any into his ser-vice from among our apostate and guilty race ! And yet he does this ; and he does it in a manner as though he were really dependent on our services, as though he were unable to conduct the affairs of his govern-ment without us ; for he not only calls us, he urges, and entreats, and even offers to reward us, though we can never be otherwise than unprofitable servants. If
2
 
we neglect his first invitations he repeats them ; if we faint in his service he supports and encourages us-; if we revolt from his service he actually follows and brings us back to it again ; he stoops to do that which we should count it a degradation to do to our fellow-creatures. He reminds us that angels are our fellow-servants ; he calls us co-workers together with himself; he even engages to applaud us at last in the face of the universe, by saying, " Well done, good and faithful servants, enter ye into the joy of your Lord." But if it be an honour to be advanced into the ser^ vice of God, how surpassing the distinction of being raised into his friendship I And yet this is his lan-guage, " Ye are my friends ; henceforth I call you not servants, but friends," Had he only regarded his people in the light of his servants, he would only have laid his commands upon them; and even this would have beer! conferring on them an honour which angels are emulous and happy to enjoy. But he not only en-trusts them with his commands, he shares with them his secrets, and honours them with his confidence. He gives them the utmost freedom of access to him, permitting them to come even to his seat, and to enter the secret of his pavilion. They share his sym-pathy, his counsel, and his aid ; and in return, they
3

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->