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02 17 14 Mon Edition

02 17 14 Mon Edition

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02 17 14 Mon Edition
02 17 14 Mon Edition

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Published by: San Mateo Daily Journal on Feb 17, 2014
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02/17/2014

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www.smdailyjournal.com
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Monday
Feb.17,2014
Vol XIII,Edition 157
TOUR BUS BOMBED
WORLD PAGE 31
 
‘12 YEARS A SLAVE’NAMED BEST FILM
WORLD PAGE 8SOUTH KOREAN SIGHTSEERS KILLED BY BLAST IN EGYPT
By Michelle Durand
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Economic development is cre-ating thousands of new Bay Area jobs but affordable housing isnot keeping pace, leaving SanMateo County and its citiesstruggling to encourage devel-opers to either provide below-market rate units or equivalentfees.San Mateo County and a num-ber of its cities are currentlybanding together for a study of those impact fees which canserve as both a guide for imple-mentation and legal rationale forthose in place. Jurisdictions are turning tothese fees for affordable housingmore and more since the dissolu-tion of redevelopment agenciesand the disappearance of a fewstate bonds. In cities where theyexist, developers must pay if they don’t provide a certainnumber or percentage of below-market rate units in their proj-ects. The funds are meant to givethe cities means to procureaffordable housing elsewherealthough, with land at a premiumon the Peninsula, that can be itsown challenge.Cities and counties are advisedto conduct what is known as anexus study of these fees to pro-vide parameters for the amountscharged, the units requested andother factors which could bechallenged in court. Some dowhile others sidestep the studyand set numbers without thatinformation, said Janet Stone,housing policy and developmentmanager with the countyDepartment of Housing.
Study targets housing fees for developers
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Frustration is mounting withan unfinished senior housingbuilding at the corner of Trousdale and Ogden drives inBurlingame and the City Councilis even considering a lawsuitagainst Sunrise Senior Living,the company that intends tobuild on the site. The four-story, 79-unit projectat 1818 Trousdale Drive wasoriginally approved by thePlanning Commission in 2006,but ran into bumps due to the2008 economic downturn, thecompany said. Potential litiga-tion was a closed session agendaitem for the City Council Fridayafternoon, but there was noaction reported out of the meet-ing, City Attorney KathleenKane said in an email.“I don’t think they’ve(Sunrise) made much progress,”said Vice Mayor Terry Nagel,who couldn’t comment further onthe potential lawsuit since it wasa closed session item.
City appliespressure onsenior home
Burlingame preps legal action,Sunrise saysplans for half-constructed building coming
Jobs/housing balance at issue;revenue would pay for new below-market rate units
By Angela Swartz
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
With 17,000 square feet of space this year, CarolynHoskins is continuing to run her black history pop-upmuseum despite some hesitance. This year may be her last though if she can’t find apermanent location for the museum, which will be at190 Independence St. in Menlo Park until Feb. 28. Herdaughter and son helped her set up the museum andlearning center in two weeks. She first began display-ing her collection of history items about 12 years agoduring February, Black History Month.“I’m frustrated and tired because I have such bigdreams about seeing the kids excited about history —it’s not happening,” she said. “Basically, when you putit all together, then you’re here by yourself, it’s verydisappointing.”
Black history on display
 ANGELA SWARTZ/DAILY JOURNAL
Carolyn Hoskins in the Domini Hoskins Black History Museum,on display this year in Menlo Park.
Bel
 
ow
 
:Hoskinswith her son Domini Hoskins,who inspired the museum when he asked about important figures in black history aside from Dr.Martin Luther King Jr.
Menlo Park museum result of Carolyn Hoskins’passion
By Samantha Weigel
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF
Anew overpass is in the worksto provide a safer path for bicy-clists and pedestrians crossingHighway 101 on HillsdaleBoulevard in San Mateo.The Hillsdale Pedestrian/BicycleBridge project would create a sepa-rate path for people to crossHillsdale Boulevard without hav-ing to encounter oncoming vehi-cles entering or exiting Highway101, according to a city report. Hillsdale Boulevard is currentlythe only overpass in the areathat’s accessible to pedestrianswith the closest being two milesnorth at 19th Avenue nearBridgepointe Parkway and theother 2.5 miles south in Belmont,
Pedestrian/bike overpassplannedfor Highway 101
See
SUNRISE
,Page
22
See
BRIDGE
,Page
23
See
FEES
,Page
22
See
MUSEUM
,Page
23
MEDAL COUNT
GOLD SILVER BRONZE TOTAL
5
NetherlandsU.S.ARussia
5 74 4 84 51716167
Norway
 5 6 143
 
Camel escapes,attacks man in Southern California
PALMDALE, — Acamel escapedfrom an enclosure in a SouthernCalifornia high desert communityFriday, stomped a 72-year-old manwho tried to capture it, and chasedother people before it calmed downand was corralled.The camel escaped in the unincor-porated community of Acton and wasreported chasing cars shortly after8:30 a.m., Los Angeles County sher-iff’s officials said.“My dad ... tried to catch it and itmust have cornered him or some-thing, and it took off after him, bithim on the head and knocked himdown and stomped on him,” SkylarDossenbach told KCBS-TV. “Hecrawled under something and thecamel tried to pull him out from underit.”Her father was hospitalized andneeded stitches for a gash to hishead, she said. His name wasn’timmediately released.“Aneighbor came out and saw thecommotion and got the camel awayfrom him,” Dossenbach told KABC-TV. “And the camel actually startedchasing them, and they had to jumpin a car, and the camel was runningaround after everybody.”Dossenbach said she finally endedup capturing the camel.“I just put a halter on him, fed hima treat and he calmly walked down tomy round pen and I corralled him,”she said.The camel was seized by animalcontrol officials because the ownerdoes not have a permit and because of the injury, agency spokeswomanBetsy Webster said.The owner could be cited for endan-gering residents, sheriff’s officialssaid.Dossenbach said the camel andother animals, including a buffaloand an ostrich, previously escapedfrom the owner’s property, which shedescribed as a zoo. There have beenas many as five escapes this year, shesaid.Dossenbach said she believed noone lives on the property but a care-taker comes by daily to feed and waterthe animals.
Big,runaway snowball slams into college dorm
PORTLAND, Ore. — Two mathmajors at Reed College lost controlof a massive snowball that rolledinto a dorm, knocking in part of abedroom wall.There were no injuries, but collegespokesman Kevin Myers said Fridayit will cost $2,000 to $3,000 torepair the building.The incident happened lastSaturday night following a rare trioof snowstorms in Portland.Students started building the giantsnowball on a campus quad near thedorm. Urged by a crowd, the mathmajors tried to make the snowball asbig as possible by rolling it downthe sidewalk that goes past the dorm.“And the ball just got away fromthem,” Myers said.After escaping their control, theboulder-sized snowball rolled about15 yards before slamming into Unit(hash)7. Three students heard thesmack and discovered the fracturedbedroom wall. The student whosedorm was damaged has not had tomove.Nobody weighed the snowball, buta maintenance worker who sliced itup for removal estimated it to weigh800 pounds or more, Myers said.The students responsible for therunaway snowball reported the inci-dent and won’t be disciplined. Myerssaid they didn’t intend to cause dam-age and feel awful about what hap-pened. He declined to release theirnames and said he didn’t know theirclass years.Reed Magazine was first to reportabout the snowball.“It was not the talk of campus untilthe story came out,” Myers said.“The people that were there knewabout it, but now it has kind of takenus by storm.”
FOR THE RECORD2
Monday
Feb.17,2014
 THEDAILYJOURNAL
The San Mateo Daily Journal
800 S. Claremont St., Suite 210, San Mateo, CA94402
Publisher: Jerry LeeEditorin Chief: Jon Mays
 jerry@smdailyjournal.comjon@smdailyjournal.comsmdailyjournal.comscribd.com/smdailyjournaltwitter.com/smdailyjournalfacebook.com/smdailyjournalPhone:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . (650) 344-5200 Fax: (650) 344-5290To Advertise:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ads@smdailyjournal.comEvents:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . calendar@smdailyjournal.comNews:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . news@smdailyjournal.comDelivery:. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . distribution@smdailyjournal.comCareer: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . info@smdailyjournal.com
As a public service,the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing.To submit obituaries,emailinformation along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com.Free obituaries are edited for style,clarity,length and grammar.If you would like to have an obituary printedmore than once,longer than 250 words or without editing,please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.
Actress DeniseRichards is 43.
This Day in HistoryThought for the Day
1864
During the Civil War, the Union shipUSS Housatonic was rammed and sunkin Charleston Harbor, S.C., by theConfederate hand-cranked submarineHLHunley, which also sank.
“Life resembles a novel more often than novels resemble life.” 
— George Sand,French author (1804-1876).
Michael Jordan is51.Actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt is 33.
Birthdays
 ANDREW SCHEINER 
Colorful floats and decorations were on display as part of the Chinese New Years Parade on Saturday in San Francisco.
Washington’s birthday
: Sunny.Highs in the upper 50s. Northwest winds5 to 15 mph.
Monday night
: Partly cloudy. Lows inthe upper 40s. Northwest winds 5 to 15mph.
Tuesday
: Mostly cloudy. Highs in theupper 50s. Northwest winds 5 to 10mph.
Tuesday night
: Mostly cloudy. Lows around 50.
Wednesday and Wednesday night
: Partly cloudy.Highs in the mid 50s. Lows in the upper 40s.
Thursday
: Sunny. Highs in the upper 50s.
Thursday night
: Partly cloudy. Lows in the upper 40s.
Friday through Saturday
: Mostly clear. Highs in theupper 50s. Lows in the upper 40s.
Local Weather Forecast
In 1863
, the International Red Cross was founded inGeneva.
In 1865
, Columbia, S.C., burned as the Confederates evac-uated and Union forces moved in. (It’s not clear which sideset the blaze.)
In 1897
, the forerunner of the National PTA, the NationalCongress of Mothers, convened its first meeting inWashington.
In 1904
, the original two-act version of GiacomoPuccini’s opera “Madama Butterfly” received a poor recep-tion at its premiere at La Scala in Milan, Italy.
In 1913
, the Armory Show, a landmark modern art exhibit,opened in New York City.
In 1933
, Newsweek magazine was first published byThomas J.C. Martyn under the title “News-Week.”
In 1944
, during World War II, U.S. forces invaded EniwetokAtoll, encountering little initial resistance from ImperialJapanese troops. (The Americans secured the atoll less thana week later.)
In 1947
, the Voice of America began broadcasting to theSoviet Union.
In 1959
, the United States launched Vanguard 2, a satellitewhich carried meteorological equipment.
In 1964
, the Supreme Court, in Wesberry v. Sanders, ruledthat congressional districts within each state had to beroughly equal in population.
In 1972
, President Richard M. Nixon departed the WhiteHouse with his wife, Pat, on a historic trip to China.
In 1988
, Lt. Col. William Higgins, a Marine Corps officerserving with a United Nations truce monitoring group, waskidnapped in southern Lebanon by Iranian-backed terrorists(he was later slain by his captors).
In other news ...
(Answers tomorrow)SPURN SKIMPPUBLIC HYPHENSaturday’sJumbles:Answer:When she realized how long it would take toremove all the corn husks, she said — SHUCKSNow arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, assuggested by the above cartoon.
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Unscramble these four Jumbles,one letter to each square,to form four ordinary words.
SEGUTLETSYTURAGITOMINO
 ©2014 Tribune Content Agency, LLCAll Rights Reserved.
   J  u  m   b   l  e  p  u  z  z   l  e  m  a  g  a  z   i  n  e  s  a  v  a   i   l  a   b   l  e  a   t  p  e  n  n  y   d  e   l   l  p  u  z  z   l  e  s .  c  o  m   /   j  u  m   b   l  e  m  a  g  s
Print answer here:
Actor Hal Holbrook is 89. Mystery writer Ruth Rendell is84. Singer Bobby Lewis is 81. Actor-comedian BarryHumphries (aka “Dame Edna”) is 80. Country singer-song-writer Johnny Bush is 79. Actress Christina Pickles is 79.Football Hall-of-Famer Jim Brown is 78. Actress Mary AnnMobley is 77. Actress Brenda Fricker is 69. Actress ReneRusso is 60. Actor Richard Karn is 58. Actor Lou DiamondPhillips is 52. Actor-comedian Larry, the Cable Guy is 51. TVpersonality Rene Syler is 51. Movie director Michael Bay is50. Singer Chante Moore is 47. Rock musician Timothy J.Mahoney (311) is 44. Actor Dominic Purcell is 44.
Lotto
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 The Daily Derby race winners are CaliforniaClassic,No.5,in first place;Solid Gold No.10,insecond place;and Hot Shot,No.3,in third place. The race time was clocked at 1:49.75.
 
3
Monday
Feb.17,2014
 THEDAILYJOURNAL
LOCAL
REDWOODCITY 
Suspicious circumstance
. Acoupleof men were seen trying to remove theSTOPsign at the corner of Arlington andDurston roads before 5:44 p.m. Saturday,Feb. 8.
Vandalism
. Agroup of teenagers usedtheir cell phones to provide light for themto spray graffiti at Lanyard and Bowspritdrives before 6:18 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8.
Attempted burglary
. Aman tried tobreak into a home through a window onMadison Avenue before 11:55 p.m.Saturday, Feb. 8
UNINCORPORATEDSANMATEO COUNTY 
Disturbance
. Awoman hit her husbandin the nose during an argument on the1400 block of Main Street in Montarabefore 9:43 a.m. Sunday, Feb. 2.
Assault and battery
. An officer brokeup a fight between intoxicated patrons infront of a bar on the 400 block of Capistrano Road in Princeton before 9:53p.m. Saturday, Jan. 25.
Vandalism
. An officer responded to areport that the front door of a business wassprayed with graffiti causing $400 in dam-ages on the 100 block of West PointAvenue in Princeton before 8:34 a.m.Tuesday, Jan. 21.
Police reports
High and dry
Aperson stole a blue Lexus and leftbehind an umbrella on the 300 block of Highland Avenue in San Mateo before8:04 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 6.
S
ir Francis Drake left his name inCalifornia on a bay not far fromSan Francisco. He also left a lega-cy that can be strange to people who comefrom a democracy that believe that rulesand laws are made for everyone from everycountry. That isn’t so I found out whilestudying piracy from the 16th to 19thcenturies. Francis Drake was one of thosewho obeyed the laws of England and disre-garded those of other countries. He was aprivateer or “corsair” given power to dis-rupt, capture, plunder and generally raisehell on any other ship other than his owncountry. He got this authority from hisgovernment during wartime.When Spain conquered Mexico and vari-ous other areas, she acquired vast sums of silver, gold and commercial goods. Thissurplus was then shipped to Spain acrossthe Atlantic Ocean from Havana. In the1560s, the Spaniards began a system of convoys to protect these riches due to thesacking of Havana by the French. By theend of the 16th century, Spain was therichest country in Europe; however theHapsburgs used this wealth to fight warsagainst the Ottoman Empire and most of Europe. This eventually bankruptedSpain.The Spanish treasure fleet developed dueto the galleons becoming targets forpirates that preyed on these ships. Asmany as 50 ships would sail in thesefleets and be escorted from the Dutch,English, French and various pirates whoworked for themselves.Francis Drake was born in England in1544 and started working on a ship (bar-que) after his father, a vicar of a church,apprenticed young Drake to a neighborthat traded along the coast. At age 23,Drake made his first voyage to theAmericas with his cousin Sir JohnHawkins. He was caught by the Spanish ina port but managed to get away with hisfriend Hawkins. After this experience, he vowedvengeance against the Spanish and beganplotting ways to capture the riches Spainshipped home. In 1572, he took twoships and sacked the town on the Isthmusof Panama that collected the gold and sil-ver from Peru for shipment to Spain. In1873, he and others made an attack on arichly laden mule train and captured 19tons of silver and gold. They buried muchof the plunder as it was too much to carryback to the ships. Carrying what treasurethey could, they traveled back to the coastwhere ships were to meet them, but theships were not there when they arrived.Burying the loot, he built a raft and sailedalong the coast to the flagship and wasrescued.With this much success, Drake returnedto England. Elizabeth I, in 1577, sentDrake on an expedition against theSpanish on the Pacific Coast of the
Sir Francis Drake — Drake’s Bay
 
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE SAN MATEO COUNTY HISTORY MUSEUM
Replica of the Golden Hind.
See
HISTORY
,Page
20

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