Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Adam, Christ, And Justification - By John Piper

Adam, Christ, And Justification - By John Piper

Ratings: (0)|Views: 3|Likes:
Published by Gilbert Hanz
That is what Paul is doing in this paragraph. In verse 14 he says he is going to view Christ in comparison and contrast with Adam. That makes Adam a type or a pattern. And the aim is to see more clearly and more fully and more deeply the work of Christ and how he became the foundation of our justification.
That is what Paul is doing in this paragraph. In verse 14 he says he is going to view Christ in comparison and contrast with Adam. That makes Adam a type or a pattern. And the aim is to see more clearly and more fully and more deeply the work of Christ and how he became the foundation of our justification.

More info:

Published by: Gilbert Hanz on Feb 19, 2014
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/19/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Adam, Christ, and Justification, Part 1
June 18, 2000 by 
 
Therefore, just as through one man sin entered into the world, and death through sin, and so death spread to all men, because all sinned - 13 for until the Law sin was in the world, but sin is not imputed when there is no law. 14 Nevertheless death reigned from Adam until Moses, even over those who had not sinned in the likeness of the offense of Adam, who is a type of Him who was to come. 15 But the free gift is not like the transgression. For if by the transgression of the one the many died, much more did the grace of God and the gift by the grace of the one Man, Jesus Christ, abound to the many. 16 The gift is not like that which came through the one who sinned; for on the one hand the judgment arose from one transgression resulting in condemnation, but on the other hand the free gift arose from many transgressions resulting in justification. 17 For if by the transgression of the one, death reigned through the one, much more those who receive the abundance of grace and of the gift of righteousness will reign in life through the One, Jesus Christ. 18 So then as through one transgression there resulted condemnation to all men, even so through one act of righteousness there resulted justification of life to all men. 19 For as through the one man's disobedience the many were made sinners, even so through the obedience of the One the many will be made righteous.
An Implication for Men
This is not a Father's Day sermon. But with one slight twist of the dial it could be. What Paul does in this paragraph is compare and contrast Adam, the first man and the father of humanity, with Jesus Christ, the second Adam and father of the new humanity. The passage begins in verse 12, "Therefore just as through one man [Adam] sin entered into the world and death through sin . . ." What this implies for fathers - though it is not at all Paul's main point here, and it won't be mine - is that Adam, the first man, had a unique burden of responsibility for leadership when he was created which Eve did not have. The reason we say this is that, even though Genesis shows that Eve was the one Satan picked to tempt, and in one sense she broke the specific commandment first not to eat of the tree, that made no difference to God or to Paul; they held the man accountable. When God came to call the couple to account, Genesis 3:9 says, "The LORD God
 
called the man, and said to him, "Where are you?" And when Paul talks about how sin entered the world and how we are all now sinners because of that first sin, he looks straight to Adam and not to Eve as the head and responsible one.  None of this is incidental. It is woven all through the Bible. The point is not that women aren't responsible or have no dealings with God directly. The point is that God holds men responsible for a unique role of leadership and protection and provision. So men, boys (who will become men); God designed you for this burden of responsibility. It is your calling. And if you fulfill it with humble, sacrificial love, it will be your glory as well.  Now that is not the point of the text. It is a subordinate implication.
Christ Is Far Greater Than Adam
The main point of the text is that what Christ has done for all who are in him is far greater than what Adam did for all who were in him.
 
The obedience of Christ is parallel, but vastly superior, to the disobedience of Adam.
 
The righteousness imputed to those who are in Christ is parallel, but vastly superior, to the sin imputed to those who are in Adam because of his disobedience.
 
The life that comes to us who are in Christ through that imputed righteousness is parallel, but vastly superior, to the death that comes to those who are in Adam through that imputed sin. The point of the paragraph is that the obedience of Christ - the obedience unto death, as Paul says in Philippians 2:8 - is the foundation of the doctrine of the imputed righteousness of Christ in the act of justification. In other words, the overarching theme of the letter to the Romans from 1:17 onward has been the doctrine of justification through faith apart from works - that believers are declared to have a right standing with God not on the basis of our inherent righteousness, but on the basis of Christ's righteousness received by faith alone. And now, in this paragraph, Paul draws this same teaching to a climax by explaining it more fully through the comparison and contrast  between the effect of Christ's obedience and the effect of Adam's disobedience. Why would he do this? Why involve himself in such a complex argument as we find in this  paragraph?
 
Adam Is a Type
Before I try to answer that, let's be sure you see for yourselves that Paul does indeed intend to draw out a parallel here between Adam and Christ. Look with me at verse 14. Don't worry for the moment about the context here. We will work on that next week. I just want to get one crucial  preliminary point from verse 14: "Nevertheless death reigned from Adam until Moses, even over those who had not sinned in the likeness of the offense of Adam, who is a type of Him who was to come." Now that last phrase is what I want you all to see. That is the hinge on which the whole  paragraph swings. Adam is a "type" of him who is to come. Adam is a type of Christ. What does "type" mean? The NIV says "pattern." Adam was a pattern of Christ who was to come. He was an example, or a foreshadowing, or a prefiguring of Christ. Let me see if I can say it so that the children can understand it. Sometimes when we want to understand something better we compare it with something like it, but not totally like it. For example, if you come to my house and I say, "Look at my dog, Sable, and tell me what you see," you might say, "She's black with white paws and brown eyes and a tail with a white tip." And that may be about it. But then I go get Pastor Livingston's dog, Lady, and put her beside my dog and say, "Now how is my dog different? What do you notice that you didn't notice before?" Then you might say, "Well, Sable is  bigger, and Lady seems to be friskier and Sable is sort of laid back, and Lady's tail kind of hangs down and Sable's curls up. And Lady has long hair and Sable has short hair. And Lady's nose is thinner." So do you see what happens: you notice new things about Sable when you compare her with another dog that is different - the size, the temperament, the curl of the tail, the length of hair, the thickness of the nose. So one way to see something better is to see it alongside something like it but different. That is what Paul is doing in this paragraph. In verse 14 he says he is going to view Christ in comparison and contrast with Adam. That makes Adam a type or a pattern. And the aim is to see more clearly and more fully and more deeply the work of Christ and how he became the foundation of our justification.  Now why? Why take this approach? There are probably other ways Paul could have explained  justification more fully and deeply. Why bring in Adam, the first man, and talk about his sin and how it affected the whole human race, and then compare that to Christ and his righteousness and how that affected all those who are in him? Why this approach?
Adam Is the Father of Every Person
There is more than one reason. And they are all woven together. Let me mention one and you will see others woven into it. Paul explains the obedience of Christ as the remedy for the damage done

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->