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A 2011-12 University error resulted in the Kansas Ath-letics department receiving nearly $45,000 in extra money rom a student-ee-unded ac-count, most o which has been paid back to Student Senate. Te account is unded by the Women’s and Non-Revenue Intercollegiate Sports ee, a required semesterly payment o $25 benefitting travel or women’s and non-revenue sports at Kansas. In 2011-12, the year the overdraf oc-cured, Kansas Athletics’ travel expenses rose by more than $1 million. In a Monday meeting, an Advisory Board overseeing the ee recommended that the current $25 ee either be elim-inated or lowered to $20. Associate Athletic Director Jim Marchiony declined to comment on the overdraf, saying the University had better inormation on the subject. University o Kansas spokesman Jack Martin stressed via email that Kansas Athletics does not handle the distribution o the student ee money.“Te student unds are disbursed to Kansas Athletics every 60 days automatically,” Martin said. “Kansas Athletics does not control the timing or the amount o the disburse-ments.”Martin said the ee payments are handled by the Comp-troller’s office and ultimately overseen up the academic chain by the Provost’s Office. Martin added that the Uni- versity noticed the error in March o 2013 and addressed the problem the ollowing summer. When Marcus etwiler took office as student body president in August o 2013, the error had not yet been addressed, according to emails obtained by the Kansan. etwiler emailed Pat Kauman, CFO o Kansas Athletics, when he noticed a negative balance o $44,704.96 in the account pertaining to the ee.Kauman orwarded the message to Jason Hornberger, senior budget and personnel administrator or the Univer-sity, explaining that he had no knowledge o the overdraf. Martin said the delay was due to staff turnover during the summer. All I know is that every so ofen throughout the year we [Athletics] will receive a wire transer rom the University, and at the end o the year we add up the amount o wires and call it ‘revenue’ on our books,” Kauman said in the email. “Seems that whoever at the University is responsible or calculating the amount o these wires may have over cal-culated it at some point(s)?” Hornberger responded to Kauman and etwiler 15 days afer the original email. Afer conducting research, he ex-
Volume 126 Issue 80
kansan.com
 Wednesday, February 19, 2014
the student voice since 1904
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2014 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 7CROSSWORD 5CRYPTOQUIPS 5OPINION 4SPORTS 8SUDOKU 5
Cloudy, thunderstorm possible, Winds SSE at 5 to 10 mph
This is the last week of the Sochi Winter Olympics.
IndexDon’t ForgetToday’s Weather
The sun will come out tomorrow
HI: 57LO: 43
BASKETBALL
PAGE 6Get all the details on Kansas’ last second win against Tech Tech last night
Bed bugs — these blood-sucking pests have been on the city’s radar or the past couple o years. But as the city commissioners were set to pass a more stringent policy on bed bug treatments last week, a halting question was asked: Who pays? It is an expensive problem that no one wants to claim re-sponsibility or. For a two-bed-room apartment, the costs o bed bug treatment can range rom $300 to $1200. While property managers may want to relegate the job to the maintenance men rath-er than hire proessionals, bed bugs are hard to eradicate with the cheaper chemical treat-ment. Tat was why the pro-posed policy requires hotels, motels and rental units to get a licensed exterminator within three days o a bed bug com-plaint. “Right now there is noth-ing that says that,” said Bri-an Jimenez, city code en-orcement manager. “Couple times the maintenance men do something, but that’s not enough. So we are going to give out pretty detailed expec-tations on our policy, what we think we want people to do.”Te problem with determin-ing who pays is that it is hard or landlords to prove that the ten-ants are responsible or bringing in the bed bugs. It could be that tenants bring it home rom their riends’ house or rom used ur-niture and mattresses. It could also be that old tenants brought the bugs in but lef without re-porting it. While some lease agree-ments, like those at Cedar-wood apartments, speciy who would pay in the case o bed bugs, many do not. When there were bed bug outbreaks at Cedarwood, the management rather than the tenants paid or proessional extermination. “It’s hard to find ault in any-body and to prove it as their ault would be very very di-ficult, so in our cases we haveronted the cost o treating the bed bugs,” Cedarwood man-ager Joshua Aarnes said. “It’swritten in our agreement. Tey can be held responsible i they do have bed bugs and don’t re-port them, however. We just ask that they report it whether to thecity or to us.”While tenants at Cedarwoodhave incentives to report it, i the tenants are solely respon-
University works to replenish overdrafted student funds 
 
YU KYUNG LEE
news@kansan.com 
HEALTHMONEYFEES
SEE BUGS PAGE 2
How do you identify bed bug bites?
“They can look like flea bites or other things that people usually don't notice when they get bitten; they usually chew on the skin a little bit and it’s not like a severe stinging bite. They sometimes move from place to place and that may be a distinguishing feature—you may get several bites in a line on an exposed area of skin.”“Some people might not notice for several days, and if they were in a place that was infested, they would be getting more and more. That would be another clue.”
Health risks?
“Mainly it causes irritation. They can be scratched a lot and they can get infected. It can potentially carry some different kind of diseases but I don’t think they are com-monly thought of as passing on blood-borne diseases”
How do you treat bed bug bites?
“Treating them is fairly easy, with antihistamines and steroid creams. It’s getting rid of the bugs that’s harder to do.”
Q&A WITH DR. ROBERT BROWN FROM WATKINS HEALTH CENTERKEY POINTS
Robert Brown 
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY ALEAH MILLINER/KANSAN
Lawrence city commissioners stalled on a proposal concerning the treatment of bed bugs because of cost concerns. The policy would require hotels, motels and rental properties to hire professional exterminators rather than giving the job to maintenance men.
MIKE VERNON
news@kansan.com 
City postpones proposal on bed bugs treatments 
Student groups receive funding
AMELIA ARVESEN
news@kansan.com 
wenty-our student orga-nizations received a piece o the Educational Opportu-nity Fund or the 2014-2015 school year totaling $275,000.Te objective o the EOF is to financially support persons o diversity across campus to allow them to remain within their pro-grams o interest through scholarships or employment through organizations. More than $500,000 was requested and the amounts designated to each group were careully decided by the EOF Board, Student Body President Marcus etwiler said. “It’s really cool to see these departments come in and say how important it is to have persons o diversity within their program and the values that it brings not only to their department but to the university community as a whole,” etwiler said. Each organization made a brie presentation to the board with a proposal o the use o unds along with numbers in the specific department. Some orga-nizations received close to the amount requested while others received only a raction. Funds were not allocated to the HawkLink Writing Fellows and the Spencer Art Museum.Te amount available to distribute is budgeted the previous year based on enrollment and the student senate activity ee. Amounts are deliberated by the board and were presented on ues-day to the organizations.Te EOF Board is made up o the student body presi-dent, a representative rom the Dean o Students Office, a representative rom the Office o Student Financial Aid, the finance committee  vice chair, the Student Sen-ate treasurer and between three and six appointed students.Hilltop Child Develop-ment Center was one o many groups who received unds close to the amount requested. “I think Student Senate goes right in line with what our mission is to continue to offer services or amilies,Bethann Smith, executive director o Hilltop, said. Alternative Breaks received $2,850 o the requested $60,902. Historically the organization has received $14,000 or scholarships and director compensation, said co-director Hannah Sitz, a senior rom Andover.“At first glance that may
TURN TO PAGE 3 TO SEE A BREAKDOWN OF WHAT FUNDING ORGANIZATIONS REQUESTED AND WHAT THEY RECEIVEDSEE FUND PAGE 2
 
UDK
University makes accounting error in 2011-2012.The error results in extra $45,000 going from a Student Sen-ate reserve account to Kansas Athletics through the Women’s and Non-Revenue Intercollegiate Sports fee. The fee is a required $25 semesterly payment for students at Kansas. The Women’s and Non-Revenue Intercollegiate Sports fee is one of 18 required campus fees for students.The University, Kansas Athletics and Student Senate all stress that the Athletic Department is not responsible for the overdraft. The University learned of the error in March of 2013.In August 2013, after prompting from student body President Marcus Tetwiler, the University replenished the funds.
SEE ATHLETICS PAGE 2
 
sible or the costs o bed bug treatments, they may leave to avoid paying or the treat-ments when they find out they have bed bugs.“In a private home, they are going to get rid o it because they don’t want to get bit all the time. Te rental peo-ple, they can just get up and move,” said City Commission-er erry Riordan, who is also a pediatrician. “We definitely don’t want the rental people to get up and move because they are going to move and inect the new unit.”It’s also an issue that needs to be resolved or licensed exterminators like Larry rowbridge, the owner o Midwest Exterminators. “We go round and round with that all the time,” row-bridge said. “It’s very difficult because we want to know who is going to pay us. Many times i it’s going to be the tenant, the tenant may not come up with it and we don’t want to be chasing our money down either.”Within two or three weeks, a new proposal dealing with the costs will be presented.“We don’t want to create a situation that’s unair to the landlord, but we also need to keep the bedbugs into becoming a significant prob-lem or the city o Lawrence,Riordan said.Reported incidences o bed bugs started a couple years o ago. Currently, the city has records o bed bugs at the Howard Johnson hotel, the Days Inn on Iowa Street, the Gazebo apartments and the Cedarwood apartments. Tere were other reported instances in single, detached homes, but the city doesn’t have a policy in place that keeps record, Jimenez said.Te rise in cases prompted the need or a policy to be put in place. “Because o the significant increase in the number o cas-es we’ve gotten, it became ap-parent that we need to address this issue rather than let it get out o control because these are little insects that can cause a significant spread,” Riordan said. Bed bugs can lay dormant or months and even years without ood and water. Tey also spread very easily through clothes, used urni-ture and old mattresses. “As a pediatrician, I have taken about hal a dozen people who had bed bug bites and they are pretty uncomortable and they are airly painul,” Riordan said. “It’s not anything anybody would want to live with.”
— Edited by Stella Liang 
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Katie Kutsko
Managing editor – production
Allison Kohn
Managing editor – digital media
Lauren Armendariz
Associate production editor
Madison Schultz
Associate digital media editor
Will Webber
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTAdvertising director
Sean Powers
Sales manager
Kolby Botts
Digital media and sales manager
Mollie Pointer
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Emma LeGault
Associate news editor
Duncan McHenry
Sports editor
Blake Schuster
Associate sports editor
Ben Felderstein
Entertainment editor
Christine Stanwood
Special sections editor
Dani Brady
Head copy chief
Tara Bryant
Copy chiefs
Casey HutchinsHayley JozwiakPaige Lytle
Design chiefs
Cole AnnebergTrey Conrad
Designers
Ali SelfClayton RohlmanHayden Parks
Opinion editor
Anna Wenner
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Associate photo editor
Michael Strickland
ADVISERS Media director and content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014PAGE 2
CONTACT US
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785)-766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: @KansanNewsFacebook: facebook.com/thekansanThe University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045. The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the school year except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out KUJH-TV on Knology of Kansas Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voice in radio. Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or special events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center 1000 Sunnyside Avenue Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather
,
Jay?
What’s the
— weather.com 
FRIDAY
HI: 57LO: 29
Partly cloudy, Winds SSW at 11 to 14 mph.
The sun is here to stay.
THURSDAY
HI: 45LO: 29
Rain in the morning will give way to sun in the afternoon.
Rain, rain go away.
SATURDAY
HI: 47LO: 28
Morning clouds followed by sun.
Go outside and play.
Calendar
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
Wednesday, Feb. 19 Thursday, Feb. 20 Friday, Feb. 21 Saturday, Feb. 22
What:
Stripping in War and Peace: Ancient Tactics for Modern Times
When:
 3:30 p.m.
Where:
 Kansas Union, Centennial Room
About:
 Omofolabo Ajayi-Soyinka, Professor of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Theatre, will lead a discussion on the peace-making efforts of African women in the continent.
What:
 Residency and fee waiver application deadline
When:
 All day
Where:
 University wide
About:
 Contact the Office of the Registrar.
What:
 Veggie Lunch
When:
 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where:
 Ecumenical Campus Minis-tries
About:
 A free vegetarian meal provided by a group that meets every Thursday at the ECM.
What:
 KU Opera: The Tragedy of Carmen
When:
 7:30 p.m.
Where:
 Robert Baustian Theatre, Murphy Hall
About:
 Tickets $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and students. Advance tick-ets available exclusively in Murphy Hall Room 460.
What:
 KU School of Architecture, Design & Planning presents: “Shored Up”
When:
Doors 6:30 p.m., show 7 p.m.
Where:
 Liberty Hall
About:
 “Shored Up,” a documentary by Ben Kalina, asks tough questions about coastal communities and hu-manity’s relationship with the land. Free for all KU students with valid ID.
What:
 Men’s Basketball vs. Texas
When:
 6:30 p.m.
Where:
 Allen FieldhouseA
bout:
 The Jayhawks take on the Texas Longhorns.
HEALTH
Pregnant students face discrimination 
MADDIE FARBER
news@kansan.com 
Annie Stenger says she aced pregnancy discrimina-tion at the University shortly afer returning to classes rom giving birth, when a proessor addressed her publicly in ront o her peers and told her she wasn’t welcome in the class.Stenger, a 2011 graduate, said her proessors were accommodating during the pregnancy, but she elt there was a negative reaction when she returned to class afer giving birth.According to University policies, pregnancy discrimi-nation is a recognized orm o gender discrimination.Passed in 1972, Te Uni- versity o Kansas adheres to itle IX o the Education Amendments Act that helps to improve the graduation rates o young and parenting students.Jane McQueeny, executive director at the Office o Institutional Opportunity and Access, said that the University does whatever possible to “look to ways to keep students engaged in the classroom while they’re pregnant.”Although maternity leave only applies to University employees, with proper documentation, students can receive excused medical leave rom the school i they become pregnant.As to the prevalence o pregnancy on campus, the Office o Institutional Opportunity and Access does not keep track o this issue. Tis is considered a matter o privacy, and according to McQueeny, there are several women, employees and students who never contact the IOA office with regards to their pregnancy. “We treat [pregnant] students as any other student with a medical condition,McQueeny said. “We help students to the best o our ability, and make allowances or both mothers and athers.”Sarah Sears, a recent grad-uate rom Leawood, became pregnant toward the end o her senior year.“I personally didn’t notiy the University officially, but I had a couple o proessors who were very lenient,” Sears said. “I did have to get special notice to get hours out o the way to graduate early, but everyone was really accom-modating.”However, Sears' sister, Stenger, said she experienced a change afer returning rom her pregnancy. Afer returning to school our weeks afer giving birth to her son, she elt that there was a negative reaction to her return. She ended up having to retake some o the same classes twice and paying or them again—in addition to being told by a proessor that she wasn’t welcome in class.“itle IX is supposed to pro-tect students. My understand-ing was whatever amount o time you missed, that’s the same amount o time you are allowed to make up. I wasn’t given that opportunity by some o the proessors I had,” Stenger said. “I elt like I was making every effort that I could.”Stenger was hesitant to address the issue with the University. Te ear that she would be making it harder or hersel to finish afer already completing three and a hal years o college restricted her rom seeking help.“I never pursued anything so I can’t speak to what the school would or would have not done,” Stenger said. “I didn’t know where to turn. It’s just unortunate that as a student I was paying tens o thousands o dollars to be denied my education.”McQueeny reassured that the University does every-thing possible to be accom-modating.“Sometimes students have to take an incomplete, but we do everything we can to help them make it up,” she said. “I students eel they are being discriminated against, they can file a complaint and it will be investigated.”
— Edited by Nick Chadbourne 
“I didn’t know where to turn. It’s just unfortunate that as a student I was paying tens of thousands of dollars to be denied my education.”
ANNIE STENGERstudent
BUGS FROM PAGE 1
 ATHLETICS FROM PAGE 1
FUND FROM PAGE 1
FRANK WEIRICH/KANSAN
Pregnancy discrimination is a form of gender discrimination and expecting students can receive help from the University.
seem crazy detrimental,” said Sitz. “We’re really excited to have $2,850 earmarked or general participation schol-arships. We look orward to working with Student Senate or other unds.”Fee, block, and line unding allocations will occur over the next three weeks.
— Edited by Kate Shelton 
plained, the University made a mistake in the late fiscal year 2011 causing the overdraf o student-ee money. Te University agreed to transer $35,999.52 to cover the shortall, reducing the amount Athletics received in the all. Te remaining $8,705.44 was not addressed in the emails. Tere was no interest added to the virtual loan rom the student body. etwiler said the overdraf has been replenished. David Catt, the chairman o the Women’s and Non-Rev-enue Intercollegiate Sports Advisory Board, recommend-ed lowering or eliminating the ee, and stressed that he does not eel Athletics was aware o this overdraf and that the Ad- visory Board did not discuss the overdraf in its meetings.
— Edited by Duncan McHenry
 
sible or the costs o bed bug treatments, they may leave to avoid paying or the treat-ments when they find out they have bed bugs.“In a private home, they are going to get rid o it because they don’t want to get bit all the time. Te rental peo-ple, they can just get up and move,” said City Commission-er erry Riordan, who is also a pediatrician. “We definitely don’t want the rental people to get up and move because they are going to move and inect the new unit.”It’s also an issue that needs to be resolved or licensed exterminators like Larry rowbridge, the owner o Midwest Exterminators. “We go round and round with that all the time,” row-bridge said. “It’s very difficult because we want to know who is going to pay us. Many times i it’s going to be the tenant, the tenant may not come up with it and we don’t want to be chasing our money down either.”Within two or three weeks, a new proposal dealing with the costs will be presented.“We don’t want to create a situation that’s unair to the landlord, but we also need to keep the bedbugs into becoming a significant prob-lem or the city o Lawrence,Riordan said.Reported incidences o bed bugs started a couple years o ago. Currently, the city has records o bed bugs at the Howard Johnson hotel, the Days Inn on Iowa Street, the Gazebo apartments and the Cedarwood apartments. Tere were other reported instances in single, detached homes, but the city doesn’t have a policy in place that keeps record, Jimenez said.Te rise in cases prompted the need or a policy to be put in place. “Because o the significant increase in the number o cas-es we’ve gotten, it became ap-parent that we need to address this issue rather than let it get out o control because these are little insects that can cause a significant spread,” Riordan said. Bed bugs can lay dormant or months and even years without ood and water. Tey also spread very easily through clothes, used urni-ture and old mattresses. “As a pediatrician, I have taken about hal a dozen people who had bed bug bites and they are pretty uncomortable and they are airly painul,” Riordan said. “It’s not anything anybody would want to live with.”
— Edited by Stella Liang 
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Katie Kutsko
Managing editor – production
Allison Kohn
Managing editor – digital media
Lauren Armendariz
Associate production editor
Madison Schultz
Associate digital media editor
Will Webber
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTAdvertising director
Sean Powers
Sales manager
Kolby Botts
Digital media and sales manager
Mollie Pointer
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Emma LeGault
Associate news editor
Duncan McHenry
Sports editor
Blake Schuster
Associate sports editor
Ben Felderstein
Entertainment editor
Christine Stanwood
Special sections editor
Dani Brady
Head copy chief
Tara Bryant
Copy chiefs
Casey HutchinsHayley JozwiakPaige Lytle
Design chiefs
Cole AnnebergTrey Conrad
Designers
Ali SelfClayton RohlmanHayden Parks
Opinion editor
Anna Wenner
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Associate photo editor
Michael Strickland
ADVISERS Media director and content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2014PAGE 2
CONTACT US
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785)-766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: @KansanNewsFacebook: facebook.com/thekansanThe University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045. The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the school year except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out KUJH-TV on Knology of Kansas Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voice in radio. Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or special events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center 1000 Sunnyside Avenue Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather
,
Jay?
What’s the
— weather.com 
FRIDAY
HI: 57LO: 29
Partly cloudy, Winds SSW at 11 to 14 mph.
The sun is here to stay.
THURSDAY
HI: 45LO: 29
Rain in the morning will give way to sun in the afternoon.
Rain, rain go away.
SATURDAY
HI: 47LO: 28
Morning clouds followed by sun.
Go outside and play.
Calendar
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
Wednesday, Feb. 19 Thursday, Feb. 20 Friday, Feb. 21 Saturday, Feb. 22
What:
Stripping in War and Peace: Ancient Tactics for Modern Times
When:
 3:30 p.m.
Where:
 Kansas Union, Centennial Room
About:
 Omofolabo Ajayi-Soyinka, Professor of Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies and Theatre, will lead a discussion on the peace-making efforts of African women in the continent.
What:
 Residency and fee waiver application deadline
When:
 All day
Where:
 University wide
About:
 Contact the Office of the Registrar.
What:
 Veggie Lunch
When:
 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where:
 Ecumenical Campus Minis-tries
About:
 A free vegetarian meal provided by a group that meets every Thursday at the ECM.
What:
 KU Opera: The Tragedy of Carmen
When:
 7:30 p.m.
Where:
 Robert Baustian Theatre, Murphy Hall
About:
 Tickets $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and students. Advance tick-ets available exclusively in Murphy Hall Room 460.
What:
 KU School of Architecture, Design & Planning presents: “Shored Up”
When:
Doors 6:30 p.m., show 7 p.m.
Where:
 Liberty Hall
About:
 “Shored Up,” a documentary by Ben Kalina, asks tough questions about coastal communities and hu-manity’s relationship with the land. Free for all KU students with valid ID.
What:
 Men’s Basketball vs. Texas
When:
 6:30 p.m.
Where:
 Allen FieldhouseA
bout:
 The Jayhawks take on the Texas Longhorns.
HEALTH
Pregnant students face discrimination 
MADDIE FARBER
news@kansan.com 
Annie Stenger says she aced pregnancy discrimina-tion at the University shortly afer returning to classes rom giving birth, when a proessor addressed her publicly in ront o her peers and told her she wasn’t welcome in the class.Stenger, a 2011 graduate, said her proessors were accommodating during the pregnancy, but she elt there was a negative reaction when she returned to class afer giving birth.According to University policies, pregnancy discrimi-nation is a recognized orm o gender discrimination.Passed in 1972, Te Uni- versity o Kansas adheres to itle IX o the Education Amendments Act that helps to improve the graduation rates o young and parenting students.Jane McQueeny, executive director at the Office o Institutional Opportunity and Access, said that the University does whatever possible to “look to ways to keep students engaged in the classroom while they’re pregnant.”Although maternity leave only applies to University employees, with proper documentation, students can receive excused medical leave rom the school i they become pregnant.As to the prevalence o pregnancy on campus, the Office o Institutional Opportunity and Access does not keep track o this issue. Tis is considered a matter o privacy, and according to McQueeny, there are several women, employees and students who never contact the IOA office with regards to their pregnancy. “We treat [pregnant] students as any other student with a medical condition,McQueeny said. “We help students to the best o our ability, and make allowances or both mothers and athers.”Sarah Sears, a recent grad-uate rom Leawood, became pregnant toward the end o her senior year.“I personally didn’t notiy the University officially, but I had a couple o proessors who were very lenient,” Sears said. “I did have to get special notice to get hours out o the way to graduate early, but everyone was really accom-modating.”However, Sears' sister, Stenger, said she experienced a change afer returning rom her pregnancy. Afer returning to school our weeks afer giving birth to her son, she elt that there was a negative reaction to her return. She ended up having to retake some o the same classes twice and paying or them again—in addition to being told by a proessor that she wasn’t welcome in class.“itle IX is supposed to pro-tect students. My understand-ing was whatever amount o time you missed, that’s the same amount o time you are allowed to make up. I wasn’t given that opportunity by some o the proessors I had,” Stenger said. “I elt like I was making every effort that I could.”Stenger was hesitant to address the issue with the University. Te ear that she would be making it harder or hersel to finish afer already completing three and a hal years o college restricted her rom seeking help.“I never pursued anything so I can’t speak to what the school would or would have not done,” Stenger said. “I didn’t know where to turn. It’s just unortunate that as a student I was paying tens o thousands o dollars to be denied my education.”McQueeny reassured that the University does every-thing possible to be accom-modating.“Sometimes students have to take an incomplete, but we do everything we can to help them make it up,” she said. “I students eel they are being discriminated against, they can file a complaint and it will be investigated.”
— Edited by Nick Chadbourne 
“I didn’t know where to turn. It’s just unfortunate that as a student I was paying tens of thousands of dollars to be denied my education.”
ANNIE STENGERstudent
BUGS FROM PAGE 1
 ATHLETICS FROM PAGE 1
FUND FROM PAGE 1
FRANK WEIRICH/KANSAN
Pregnancy discrimination is a form of gender discrimination and expecting students can receive help from the University.
seem crazy detrimental,” said Sitz. “We’re really excited to have $2,850 earmarked or general participation schol-arships. We look orward to working with Student Senate or other unds.”Fee, block, and line unding allocations will occur over the next three weeks.
— Edited by Kate Shelton 
plained, the University made a mistake in the late fiscal year 2011 causing the overdraf o student-ee money. Te University agreed to transer $35,999.52 to cover the shortall, reducing the amount Athletics received in the all. Te remaining $8,705.44 was not addressed in the emails. Tere was no interest added to the virtual loan rom the student body. etwiler said the overdraf has been replenished. David Catt, the chairman o the Women’s and Non-Rev-enue Intercollegiate Sports Advisory Board, recommend-ed lowering or eliminating the ee, and stressed that he does not eel Athletics was aware o this overdraf and that the Ad- visory Board did not discuss the overdraf in its meetings.
— Edited by Duncan McHenry

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