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Letter on Retro Pay for the Chief

Letter on Retro Pay for the Chief

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Published by morecaucusnyc
Editor’ s note: This letter to the Municipal Labor Committee is printed here at the request of its authors.
To the MLC:
As you begin contract negotiations with the de Blasio administration, the undersigned implore you to mobilize the full power of a united NYC public-sector workforce to put forward a powerful message. After years of effective pay cuts, we expect and deserve not just a new contract, but one with retroactive wage increases and no givebacks.
NYC municipal workers have been working under worse conditions and for less pay than at any time since the recession of the 1970s.
Still, each and every day, we keep the city running. The deadly Superstorm Sandy showed the world, once again, the heroism of our nurses, firefighters, sanitation, transit, and other city workers, who saved the stranded and worked tirelessly to get the city back on its feet.
Why, then, are we losing ground? Former Mayor Bloomberg had refused to negotiate new contracts for municipal employees. With the cost of living on the rise, the net effect has been an across-the-board wage cut. We are among the nearly half of New Yorkers — 49 percent — who are paying rents that Federal benchmarks consider unaffordable. The prices of basic necessities are increasing as well.
Not all New Yorkers have had to make such sacrifices. Since the massive financial crisis in 2008, and subsequent multi-trillion dollar Federal bailout, Wall Street has made billions in profits—$24 billion in 2012 alone. Likewise, New York’s real-estate industry continues to boom, greased with hundreds of millions of dollars in tax breaks.
To put it plainly, public-sector and working-class New Yorkers have been subsidizing the billion-dollar profits of Wall Street and the real-estate industry with their tax money.
We are the Teachers who put in extra hours helping kids learn. We are the health-care and social workers taking care of the most vulnerable New Yorkers. We keep the garbage off the streets, we take people to work and to school, and we respond to every emergency. We earn what we receive, unlike the billionaires who treat our city budget like their personal ATM.
The city can afford retroactive pay for city workers and not cut back on other services. Over half of the past eight years, the city has run budget surpluses of over a billion dollars, even after factoring in the estimated $3 billion in tax breaks businesses receive every year. Small increases to taxes on high-end real estate, financial transactions, and other taxes on New York’s 1 percent could more than fund retroactive raises for city workers, fund needed programs like universal pre-K, and help offset years of budget cuts to city hospitals, ACS, and other municipal services.
The fate of New York City’s municipal workers is of critical importance for all New Yorkers. Underpaid and unemployed workers need subsidies to survive. As our standard of living decreases, it strains the economy, hurts our families, and makes it harder to do our jobs. If we fight for a just contract, and stand in solidarity with other important campaigns, like the low-wage workers who are fighting for a $15 minimum wage, then a rising tide can raise all boats.

New York City today is a tale of two cities. If Mayor de Blasio genuinely wants to tackle income inequality, we urge him to start at the bargaining table with city workers.
Fairness, and good economic sense, demand full retroactive pay raises and full cost-of-living adjustments for all New York City municipal workers.
Note: Over 1,000 municipal workers signed on to the above statement via online and in-person petitions, demanding action from the MLC. These petitions have been circulated among members of many different MLC unions, and recently the New York State Nurses Association (representing RNs at HHC) has endorsed the above statement.
We’re asking all city workers and members of the MLC to read our petition, sign it, pass it around among colleagues, and to get more union loc
Editor’ s note: This letter to the Municipal Labor Committee is printed here at the request of its authors.
To the MLC:
As you begin contract negotiations with the de Blasio administration, the undersigned implore you to mobilize the full power of a united NYC public-sector workforce to put forward a powerful message. After years of effective pay cuts, we expect and deserve not just a new contract, but one with retroactive wage increases and no givebacks.
NYC municipal workers have been working under worse conditions and for less pay than at any time since the recession of the 1970s.
Still, each and every day, we keep the city running. The deadly Superstorm Sandy showed the world, once again, the heroism of our nurses, firefighters, sanitation, transit, and other city workers, who saved the stranded and worked tirelessly to get the city back on its feet.
Why, then, are we losing ground? Former Mayor Bloomberg had refused to negotiate new contracts for municipal employees. With the cost of living on the rise, the net effect has been an across-the-board wage cut. We are among the nearly half of New Yorkers — 49 percent — who are paying rents that Federal benchmarks consider unaffordable. The prices of basic necessities are increasing as well.
Not all New Yorkers have had to make such sacrifices. Since the massive financial crisis in 2008, and subsequent multi-trillion dollar Federal bailout, Wall Street has made billions in profits—$24 billion in 2012 alone. Likewise, New York’s real-estate industry continues to boom, greased with hundreds of millions of dollars in tax breaks.
To put it plainly, public-sector and working-class New Yorkers have been subsidizing the billion-dollar profits of Wall Street and the real-estate industry with their tax money.
We are the Teachers who put in extra hours helping kids learn. We are the health-care and social workers taking care of the most vulnerable New Yorkers. We keep the garbage off the streets, we take people to work and to school, and we respond to every emergency. We earn what we receive, unlike the billionaires who treat our city budget like their personal ATM.
The city can afford retroactive pay for city workers and not cut back on other services. Over half of the past eight years, the city has run budget surpluses of over a billion dollars, even after factoring in the estimated $3 billion in tax breaks businesses receive every year. Small increases to taxes on high-end real estate, financial transactions, and other taxes on New York’s 1 percent could more than fund retroactive raises for city workers, fund needed programs like universal pre-K, and help offset years of budget cuts to city hospitals, ACS, and other municipal services.
The fate of New York City’s municipal workers is of critical importance for all New Yorkers. Underpaid and unemployed workers need subsidies to survive. As our standard of living decreases, it strains the economy, hurts our families, and makes it harder to do our jobs. If we fight for a just contract, and stand in solidarity with other important campaigns, like the low-wage workers who are fighting for a $15 minimum wage, then a rising tide can raise all boats.

New York City today is a tale of two cities. If Mayor de Blasio genuinely wants to tackle income inequality, we urge him to start at the bargaining table with city workers.
Fairness, and good economic sense, demand full retroactive pay raises and full cost-of-living adjustments for all New York City municipal workers.
Note: Over 1,000 municipal workers signed on to the above statement via online and in-person petitions, demanding action from the MLC. These petitions have been circulated among members of many different MLC unions, and recently the New York State Nurses Association (representing RNs at HHC) has endorsed the above statement.
We’re asking all city workers and members of the MLC to read our petition, sign it, pass it around among colleagues, and to get more union loc

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Published by: morecaucusnyc on Feb 20, 2014
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04/06/2014

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Letter: Why 'Retro' is Essential
 
Posted: Friday, February 14, 2014 5:00 pm
http://thechiefleader.com/opinion/letters_to_editor/letter-why-retro-is-essential/article_aa64b360-9409-11e3-91f7-0017a43b2370.html  Editor’s note: This letter to the Municipal Labor Committee is printed here at the request of its authors.
 
To the MLC:
 As you begin contract negotiations with the de Blasio administration, the undersigned implore you to mobilize the full power of a united NYC public-sector workforce to put forward a powerful message. After years of effective pay cuts, we expect and deserve not  just a new contract, but one with retroactive wage increases and no givebacks. NYC municipal workers have been working under worse conditions and for less pay than at any time since the recession of the 1970s. Still, each and every day, we keep the city running. The deadly Superstorm Sandy showed the world, once again, the heroism of our nurses, firefighters, sanitation, transit, and other city workers, who saved the stranded and worked tirelessly to get the city back on its feet. Why, then, are we losing ground? Former Mayor Bloomberg had refused to negotiate new contracts for municipal employees. With the cost of living on the rise, the net effect has been an across-the-board wage cut. We are among the nearly half of New Yorkers — 49 percent — who are paying rents that Federal benchmarks consider unaffordable. The prices of basic necessities are increasing as well. Not all New Yorkers have had to make such sacrifices. Since the massive financial crisis in 2008, and subsequent multi-trillion dollar Federal bailout, Wall Street has made billions in profits—$24 billion in 2012 alone. Likewise, New York’s real-estate industry continues to boom, greased with hundreds of millions of dollars in tax breaks. To put it plainly, public-sector and working-class New Yorkers have been subsidizing the billion-dollar profits of Wall Street and the real-estate industry with their tax money. We are the Teachers who put in extra hours helping kids learn. We are the health-care and social workers taking care of the most vulnerable New Yorkers. We keep the garbage off the streets, we take people to work and to school, and we respond to every emergency. We earn what we receive, unlike the billionaires who treat our city budget like their personal ATM. The city can afford retroactive pay for city workers and not cut back on other services. Over half of the past eight years, the city has run budget surpluses of over a billion dollars, even after factoring in the estimated $3 billion in tax breaks businesses receive every year. Small increases to taxes on high-end real estate, financial transactions, and other taxes on New York’s 1 percent could more than fund retroactive raises for city workers, fund needed programs like universal pre-K, and help offset years of budget cuts to city hospitals, ACS, and other municipal services. The fate of New York City’s municipal workers is of critical importance for all New Yorkers. Underpaid and unemployed workers need subsidies to survive. As our standard of living decreases, it strains the economy, hurts our families, and makes it harder to do our  jobs. If we fight for a just contract, and stand in solidarity with other important campaigns, like the low-wage workers who are fighting for a $15 minimum wage, then a rising tide can raise all boats.

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