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2-20-14

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Published by: The University Daily Kansan on Feb 20, 2014
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02/25/2014

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KU college lie is about to go viral.I’m Shmacked arrived in Lawrence yesterday while on a tour o college campuses.Te group’s Youube channel eatures videos o party scenes at different colleges across America. Four minute videos eature clips o women grinding, stacks o books at a library, ground weed being loaded onto joint paper, students walking across campus, abandoned beer pong tables ull o toppled red Solo cups, campus buildings’ acades and men throwing peace signs to the camera at a dark dance club to the tune o hip-hop music and students explaining their work-play balance. Maggie Young, Panhellenic Association president, met with sorority chapter presidents about I’m Shmacked’s scheduled visit.“Te ramifications o negative social media can, as we all know, have a very lasting effect on any individual’s lie,” Young wrote in an email. “Women in the Panhellenic community are ree to make their own choices at all times, we just want to ensure that they consider how certain choices could come back to haunt them in the uture, beyond the scope o their college careers.Kevin Simpson, KU Interraternity Council president, contacted raternity chapter leaders.“Our message was that we should always be doing our best to positively represent our various Greek organizations and the University o Kansas as a whole, regardless o whether or not cameras are around,” Simpson wrote in an email.Te scenes the account portrays are not representative o the majority o students, said Jill Jess Phythyon, director o KU News Service.“Unortunately, an outside group is making money by exploiting the bad decisions o a small minority o the University population,” Phythyon said in an email. “Glorification o dangerous drinking and irresponsible partying paints an unrealistic picture o what college lie means or the majority o our student body. Clearly, universities nationwide need to have conversations to remind students that college un doesn’t need to involve stupid choices.”Te account holders o @ImShmacked declined to comment beore this article was published.
— Edited by Katie Gilbaugh 
UDK
 
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
WEEKEND EDITION
Volume 126 Issue 81
kansan.com
 Thursday, February 20, 2014
 
the student voice since 1904
 
MEN’S BASKETBALL
PAGE 7BKansas will attempt to tie up the season series against Texas on Saturday after a close call at Texas Tech
All contents, unless stated otherwise, © 2014 The University Daily Kansan
CLASSIFIEDS 2BCROSSWORD 5ACRYPTOQUIPS 5AOPINION 4ASPORTS 1BSUDOKU 5A
Rain. 70 percent chance of rain. Wind NW at 27 mph.
It’s Love Your Pet Day. Smooch your pooch.
IndexDon’t ForgetToday’s Weather
Raindrops fallin’ on my head.
HI: 45LO: 30
FUNDING
Afer the death o all honey bees in the KU Natural History Museum exhibit on Feb. 6 due to the same extreme cold that shut down campus, the museum has announced plans to introduce new bees this spring. A new colony and queen will be purchased rom a bee supplier in order to restock the popular exhibit that ofen times attracts repeat visitors to the museum.“It’s a unique way to give access to something that people are usually a bit earul o,” said Bruce Scherting, KU Natural History Museum director o exhibits. “Check back in the spring. Hopeully things will be buzzing.”Te observational colony housed in the museum lives in a structure that allows the bees to leave the hive via a tube in order to go out and get ood.“Tey were all at the end o the tube which makes us think they were trying to block the cold easterly wind that had been blowing or those two days rom entering into the colony,” Scherting said.When the colony first started off in the museum it had about 20,000 bees. But during the all the population had been reduced to a couple hundred bees because o a parasite problem. Te bees were being nursed back to health in order to make it through the winter months. However, Scherting believes that there were just not enough bees in the hive at the time in order to keep the colony warm.“We have lost bees beore in the past due to disease or parasites. We have never lost them to this type o a weather situation,” Scherting said.Te slope o the tube going rom the bee tree, where the
Bees to be replaced after hive loss
CAMPUS
ASSOCIATED PRESS
In this photo taken on Jan. 31, HoneyLove.org founder, and beekeeper Rob McFarland inspects his beehive, which he has kept on the roof of his Los ngeles house for the past three years.
DARCEY ALTSCHWAGER
news@kansan.com 
LAWRENCE
‘I’m Shmacked’ comes to campus 
Questions remain in Athletics Fee conversation 
SEE BEES PAGE 9A
“It’s a unique way to give access to something that people are usually a bit fearful of.”BRUCE SCHERTINGDirector of exhibits
EMILY DONOVANAMELIA ARVESEN
news@kansan.com 
MIKE VERNON
mvernon@kansan.com 
HOW DOES KU COMPARE?
University of Kansas $25.00 $150.00Kansas State $13.09 $295.00, $235.00, $150.00Iowa State $31.50 $249.00Oklahoma State $60.00 $250.00
BIG 12 SCHOOLS STUDENT FEES STUDENT TICKET PACKAGES
Four schools in the Big 12 conference have a required student fee and an optional student ticket package. Here’s how KU stacks up against the others.
premiumbasic combofootball
— KU Athletics 
SEE FUNDS PAGE 9A
A undamental question stands at the oreront o an ongoing conversation or Student Senate: should students help finance Kansas Athletics — an integral part o the University that brought in $93.6 million in revenue in 2013?Te debate resuraced in Monday’s recommendation rom the Women’s and Non-Revenue Intercollegiate Sports Fee Advisory Board to lower or eliminate the ee. Te Advisory Board consists entirely o students, including chairman David Catt — a ormer student-athlete. Students currently pay a required $25 semesterly ee to the Kansas Athletics Department. Tis year, the ee will result in between $1.2 and $1.3 million going rom students to athletics. I the ee is lowered or eliminated, the money could be used by Student Senate elsewhere.“Tis is Jayhawks helping Jayhawks,” Associate Athletic Director Jim Marchiony said, echoing a statement rom an Advisory Board member in Monday’s meeting. Catt, who compiled a comprehensive report detailing financial inormation rom Student Senate and Kansas Athletics, questioned the ee’s possible benefits or the student body. “I think, i anything, it’s the job o Student Senate to definitely critically think about which ees are absolutely necessary and which generate the greatest return or the student body,” Catt said. “I see a very minimal return on investment or the entire student body.
WHAT IS THE FEE? 
Every University student, knowingly or unknowingly, pays 18 required campus ees. Student Senate is in charge o distributing these ees.Some o the University’s other required campus ees include a $134.70 Student Health Fee unding operations o Student Health Services, a $4.45 Newspaper Readership Program Fee providing USA oday, Te New York imes and Te Kansan across campus and a $16.30 SaeRide Fee to und car and bus services running rom 10:30 p.m. to 2:30 a.m. In 1979, when universities were required to enorce itle IX regulations, a $1.50 Women’s and Non-Revenue Intercollegiate Sports Fee was introduced. Adjusted or inflation, that ee would equal $4.81 today.Te ee directly unds travel or women’s and men’s non-revenue sports, in part keeping travel equitable between men’s and women’s sports.Te ee has increased over time, peaking at $40 rom 2006-2011 when students helped und a new $6 million, 14,000-square-oot rowing team boathouse next to the Kansas River near Burcham Park. It was lowered to $25 in 2012.“ravel costs have increased while the student ee has not,” Marchiony said. “Have you bought a gallon o gas lately? Te cost o travel has increased dramatically.”From 2005-2012, Athletics travel costs rose rom $2.8 million to $8.5 million. A women’s gol team trip to Ireland in the summer o 2013 raised questions within Student Senate.“Are we unding that?” Student Body President Marcus etwiler asked earlier in the year. “Are the 25,000 students at KU subsidizing lavish expenses?”
HOW DOES KANSAS COMPARE? 
According to inormation provided by Kansas Athletics or Catt’s report, “A Summary o Inormation Pertinent to theWomen’s and Non-RevenueIntercollegiate Sports Fee,”only our universities in the Big 12 bring in revenue rom both student ees and optional student ticket sales.
 
What:
 Residency and fee waiver application deadline
When:
 All day
Where:
 University wide
About:
 Contact the Office of the Registrar.
What:
 Veggie Lunch
When:
 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Where:
 Ecumenical Campus Ministries
About:
 A free vegetarian meal that meets every Thursday at the ECM.
What:
 KU Opera: The Tragedy of Carmen
When:
 7:30 p.m.
Where:
 Robert Baustian Theatre, Murphy Hall
About:
 Tickets $15 for adults, $10 for seniors and students. Advance tickets available exclusively in 460 Murphy Hall.
What:
 KU School of Architecture, Design & Planning presents: “Shored Up”
When:
Doors 6:30 p.m., show 7 p.m.
Where:
 Liberty Hall
About:
 “Shored Up,” a documentary by Ben Kalina, asks tough questions about coastal communities and hu-manity’s relationship with the land. Free for all KU students with valid ID
What:
 Men’s Basketball vs. Texas
When:
 6:30 p.m.
Where:
 Allen FieldhouseA
bout:
 The Jayhawks take on the Texas Longhorns at home.
What:
 The Spencer Consort: “Baroque Murmurs for Soprano and Flutes”
When:
 2:30 p.m.
Where:
 Spencer Museum of Art
About:
The Spencer Consort, a period instrument ensemble, will perform with guest soprano Etta Fung. Admittance is free.
Calendar
Thursday, Feb. 20 Friday, Feb. 21 Saturday, Feb. 22Sunday, Feb. 23
NEWS MANAGEMENTEditor-in-chief
Katie Kutsko
Managing editor – production
Allison Kohn
Managing editor – digital media
Lauren Armendariz
Associate production editor
Madison Schultz
Associate digital media editor
Will Webber
ADVERTISING MANAGEMENTAdvertising director
Sean Powers
Sales manager
Kolby Botts
Digital media and sales manager
Mollie Pointer
NEWS SECTION EDITORSNews editor
Emma LeGault
Associate news editor
Duncan McHenry
Sports editor
Blake Schuster
Associate sports editor
Ben Felderstein
Entertainment editor
Christine Stanwood
Special sections editor
Dani Brady
Head copy chief
Tara Bryant
Copy chiefs
Casey HutchinsHayley JozwiakPaige Lytle
Design chiefs
Cole AnnebergTrey Conrad
Designers
Ali SelfClayton RohlmanHayden Parks
Opinion editor
Anna Wenner
Photo editor
George Mullinix
Associate photo editor
Michael Strickland
ADVISERS Media director and content strategist
Brett Akagi
Sales and marketing adviser
 Jon Schlitt
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014PAGE 2A
CONTACT US
editor@kansan.comwww.kansan.comNewsroom: (785)-766-1491Advertising: (785) 864-4358Twitter: @KansanNewsFacebook: facebook.com/thekansanThe University Daily Kansan is the student newspaper of the University of Kansas. The first copy is paid through the student activity fee. Additional copies of The Kansan are 50 cents. Subscriptions can be purchased at the Kansan business office, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue, Lawrence, KS., 66045. The University Daily Kansan (ISSN 0746-4967) is published daily during the school year except Friday, Saturday, Sunday, fall break, spring break and exams and weekly during the summer session excluding holidays. Annual subscriptions by mail are $250 plus tax. Send address changes to The University Daily Kansan, 2051A Dole Human Development Center, 1000 Sunnyside Avenue.
KANSAN MEDIA PARTNERS
Check out KUJH-TV on Knology of Kansas Channel 31 in Lawrence for more on what you’ve read in today’s Kansan and other news. Also see KUJH’s website at tv.ku.edu.KJHK is the student voice in radio. Whether it’s rock ‘n’ roll or reggae, sports or special events, KJHK 90.7 is for you.
2000 Dole Human Development Center 1000 Sunnyside Avenue Lawrence, Kan., 66045
weather
,
Jay?
What’s the
— weather.com 
SATURDAY
HI: 46LO: 27
Sunny. 10 percent chance of rain. Wind NNW at 16 mph.
It’s a beautiful day.
FRIDAY
HI: 57LO: 29
Sunny. Zero percent chance of rain. Wind WSW at 19 mph.
It’s gettin’ hot in here.
SUNDAY
HI: 39LO: 24
Cloudy. 20 percent chance of rain. Wind NNW at 13 mph.
Blue skies are coming.
N
THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
news
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TECHNOLOGY
CODY KUIPER
news@kansan.com 
Sarah Jacobs, a reshman rom Basehor, was doing something typical or a college reshman: looking or a part-time job. While browsing the listings on Craigslist though, she nearly ell victim to an online scam.Jacobs contacted a poster or a simple receptionist position, but the situation quickly became suspicious afer that. “He started to get me to work or him right away, without doing an interview or any paperwork,” Jacobs said. “I kept telling him, ‘No, I’m not doing anything or you. I haven’t signed any paperwork. I’m not your employee.’ But he just kept trying to send me stuff.”Tings escalated rom there, with the Craigslist poster sending Jacobs a check or $2,400 without having done any work. Afer doing some research online, she ound that multiple people had allen  victim to the same scam, one that attempted to launder money through victims under the guise o a receptionist job. “I I’m doing anything like that online now, I make sure it has the name o the company and that the location is in the advertisement,” Jacobs said. “Sometimes companies won’t put their name up and stuff like that, so I know now I have to be more aware o that.Jacobs is not alone in her brush with an online scam. Young adults are the most at-risk group or online identity thef and scams, according to the Better Business Bureau, and 1 in 10 Internet users has had personal inormation stolen, according to Pew Research Center.Amy Schroeder, a sophomore rom Colby, nearly ell victim to an online scam as well. While attempting to sell her laptop on Craigslist, Schroeder got an offer rom a man in Caliornia who said he would pay via check. When she received the check, it was or $2,500, significantly more than the $400 Schroeder was asking or. Te buyer wanted her to cash the check and give the rest o the money to a “riend” o his, but Schroeder became suspicious and reported the situation to her bank, who said it was a common scam to get money rom raudulent checks. “I think i you’re a college student it’s easy to get caught up in things like this,” Schroeder said. “You think, ‘Oh, here’s money’ but you have to make sure you check the background and make sure you’re not being scammed, which I don’t think a lot o college students do.”Sergeant rent McKinley o the Lawrence Police Department said other scams that are currently popular involve scammers posing as the IRS in order to trick Internet users into sending personal inormation, as well as emails that are purporting to be a sign-up or healthcare.gov.McKinley said when dealing with these sorts o scams, or any sort o person-to-person interaction with someone you haven’t met, users should be aware o certain types o suspicious behavior.“Any time anybody is asking you to wire money somewhere, that’s an indication that you need to consider what they’re doing,” McKinley said. “When you see things in broken English too, where someone is trying to communicate with you and the sentences aren’t complete and punctuation and conjugation aren’t correct, that’s an indication that you may be dealing with someone dealing with you overseas.”In some cases, online scammers specifically set their sights on college students and attempt to rope targets in with promises o ake scholarships or cheap student loans. In these instances, students are tricked by official-looking documents or web advertisements and end up paying or a ake service or get tricked into an expensive loan without realizing it. o avoid situations like this, the office o Federal Student Aid says students should never pay or help to find scholarship money and to check with your university beore giving personal inormation to a lender.I students suspect they have been a victim o an online scam, McKinley said to check or popular scams online and file a complaint with the FBI at www.ic3.gov, but he warned that those who don’t spot one early like Jacobs and Schroeder probably don’t stand a chance o getting their money back.“As soon as we determine that the money went to a Western Union location here in town and then maybe got wired to somewhere in South Arica or something like that, our investigation is probably over,” McKinley said. “We’re probably not going to be able to reach the scammer and get your money back. Tat’s why they like wire transers, once it’s gone, it’s gone.”
— Edited by Katie Gilbaugh 
PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY FRANK WEIRICH/KANSAN
Young adults are the group most often targeted for online scams, according to the Better Business Bureau. College students are often tricked into giving out personal information while seeking financial aid.
Students most at-risk  group for online scams 
CORRECTION
A news story that ran on page three of Wednesday’s edition, “Campus club raises money for tree replacement project,” incorrectly stated that the ash trees on the Stauffer-Flint lawn have been infested by the emerald ash borer beetle. The beetle has infested trees in several nearby counties, but has not yet been found in Douglas County. The KU Environs Replant Mount Oread initiative is, in part, planting trees in anticipation of its inevitable arrival, but it has not yet been discovered on campus. A quote in the story also incorrectly named the “ash elm trees,” which is not a real tree species. Finally, the Environs group’s fundraising and educational events will take place in the first two weeks of March and not the last two weeks in February.
RockChalkLiving.com
SEARCH DON’T SETTLE
STUDENT’S PREMIERE HOUSING SITE
 
Many students complain that the temperatures of classrooms across campus are inconsistent and uncomfortable. Some buildings are too cold, others are too warm and it seems that not many of them are just right. Te extreme temperatures make it difficult for some students to concentrate.“Te classrooms would be so cold that I wouldn’t be able to take off my coat. I was very uncomfortable,” said Lynna Pham, a freshman from Witchita. Jay Phillips, director of Facilities Services, said that the simplest solution to the problem of complaints is for students and faculty to file facility reports when the temperatures seem unbearable.However, some of the temperature issues are not so simple to solve. Te University operates on a seasonal heating and cooling system that doesn’t allow for constant change to coincide with the volatile Kansas weather.“Many of our buildings are two-pipe systems rather than four-pipe systems,” Phillips said. “Four-pipe systems have cooling water and heating water, supply and return. So you can get both heating and cooling if you need it at any time. When you have a two-pipe system, you have one or the other. You have heat in the winter and you have cooling in the summer.”Te age of certain buildings contributes to the inconsistency in temperature, as well. Some of the older buildings function on an out-of-date system that doesn’t allow for optimal control of temperatures.“In a lot of cases, we have pneumatic controls in some buildings, which they don’t really use anymore,” Phillips said. “Pneumatic is air-driven, so it will use an air system to help control the system instead of digital thermostats. When a new building is built we have a lot more ability to control the temperature and systems within it.”Te University’s energy policy requires a standard temperature to aim for across campus that is meant to use sufficient amounts of energy and supply a comfortable temperature. According to Phillips, the University aims to heat buildings up to 69 degrees in the winter and cool to 76 degrees in the summer, though the temperatures don’t always reach this standard.Facilities Services is trying to modernize many of the heating and cooling units.George Werth, campus energy manager, said that there is a possibility of adding an array of solar panels so that the University’s energy use is more sustainable and efficient. Facilities Services is applying for a grant through Westar Energy that is due by March 1. If selected, the University plans to add the solar panel array by the end of 2015.Currently, the University’s steam plant, which is a natural gas-fired plant, provides steam through a central distribution system to heat the buildings in the winter. Steam is one of the more efficient sources of energy that the University uses.Phillips urges students to assist with the efforts.“Te best source of sustainable savings is from people; from students,” Phillips said. “urning off lights, powering down equipment, keeping a fume hood closed,  just look to conserve energy anywhere you can.”
— Edited by Alec Weaver 
Sixty-six years ago, Franklin Murphy became dean of the KU School of Medicine at only 32 years of age. He was the youngest man in the country to hold such an office. Three years later, he replaced Deane Malott as KU’s ninth (and certainly youngest) chancellor.
 
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2014PAGE 3ATHE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN
Kansas House passes bill to exempt textbook sales from taxes
Both KU students and on-cam-pus bookstores might have more cash in their pockets when the Fall 2014 semester arrives.House Bill 2557, which was successfully amended by Rep. Brandon Whipple, D-Wichita, on Tuesday to include a tax refund on textbooks bought by students in pursuit of a post-secondary education. The bill successfully passed the House committee on Wednesday with a 122-0 vote.Steve Levin, general manager of the Jayhawk Bookstore, said that he thinks it will be beneficial for him as well as the state if the bill becomes a law because it will in-crease the money being spent in the state.“Buying a physics book here, even though there is no sales tax — that $150 will stay in Kan-sas,” Levin said. “You save on a $300 textbook bill, that will be about $25 that you can go ahead and spend at Pickleman’s or someplace else, buy some pizza. It keeps the money here.”Rep. Ken Corbet, R-Topeka, and Rep. Jerry Lunn, R-Overland Park, were both unavailable for com-ment regarding the bill’s passing on Wednesday afternoon.Student Senate outreach di-rector Morgan Said has not yet returned remarks regarding the bill’s passing.
— Tom Dehart 
POLICYCAMPUS
University looks to modernize heating systems 
TERRI HARVEY
news@kansan.com 
- It’s difficult for the University to maintain a consistent heat throughout the buildings on campus because of a few out-of-date systems.- The University follows a strict sustainability policy that supports sustainable alternatives such as steam power and regulated temperatures.- Solar paneling may be in the works to allow for a more sus-tainable use of energy and a more modern, efficient system.
KEY POINTS
ECONOMY
Colorado pot market exceeds tax hopes
ASSOCIATED PRESS
DENVER — Colorado’s legal marijuana market is far exceeding tax expectations, according to a budget proposal released Wednesday by Gov. John Hickenlooper that gives the first official estimate of how much the state expects to make from pot taxes.Te proposal outlines plans to spend some $99 million next fiscal year on substance abuse prevention, youth marijuana use prevention and other priorities. Te money would come from a statewide 10 percent sales tax on recreational pot, indicating Colorado’s total sales next fiscal year will be near $1 billion.Retail sales began Jan. 1 in Colorado. Sales have been strong, though exact figures for January sales won’t be made public until early next month.Te governor predicted sales and excise taxes next fiscal year would produce some $98 million, well above a $70 million annual estimate given to voters when they approved the pot taxes last year. Te governor also includes taxes from medical pot, which are subject only to the statewide 2.9 percent sales tax.Washington state budget forecasters released a projection Wednesday for that state, where retail sales don’t begin for a few months.Economic forecasters in Olympia predicted that the state’s new legal recreational marijuana market will bring nearly $190 million to state coffers over four years starting in mid-2015. Washington state sets budgets biennially.In Colorado, Hickenlooper’s proposal listed six priorities for spending the pot sales taxes.Te spending plan included $45.5 million for youth use prevention, $40.4 million for substance abuse treatment and $12.4 million for public health.“We view our top priority as creating an environment where negative impacts on children from marijuana legalization are avoided completely,” Hickenlooper wrote in a letter to legislative budget writers, which must approve the plan.Te governor also proposed a $5.8 million, three-year “statewide media campaign on marijuana use,” presumably highlighting the drug’s health risks. Te state Department of ransportation would get $1.9 million for a new “Drive High, Get a DUI” campaign to tout the state’s new marijuana blood-limit standard for drivers.
“The classrooms would be so cold that I wouldn’t be able to take off my coat. I was very uncomfortable.”LYNNA PHAMFreshman from Wichita

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