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To What Extent Did the British’s Advanced War and Mobilization

To What Extent Did the British’s Advanced War and Mobilization

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SAMPLE IB PAPER from class of 2009: To what extent did the British’s advanced war and mobilization strategies have an advantage Over the German in the First Naval Battles of Both World Wars?
SAMPLE IB PAPER from class of 2009: To what extent did the British’s advanced war and mobilization strategies have an advantage Over the German in the First Naval Battles of Both World Wars?

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Published by: wendyy on Oct 09, 2009
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Choi 1
To what extent did the British’s advanced war and mobilization strategies have an advantageOver the German in the First Naval Battles of Both World Wars?IB 20
th
Century History HLHistorical InvestigationWord Count: 1287
 
Choi 2
In both World War I and World War II, the British are generally regarded as the victor of the first major single-day naval battles. However, the two battles have many differences in itsactual significance on both world wars. On the 28
th
of August, 1914, Commodores ReginaldTyrwhitt and Roger Keyes— reinforced by additional forces led by Vice admiral David Beatty— led a speedy assault towards the major body of the German High Seas Fleet. Surprised andoutnumbered, the Germans fought fiercely but were shattered by the well-planned British forces.Devastated, the Germans suffered casualties nearly fourteen times its attacker before. This battlewas compared to “a dog rush in on a flock of sheep and scatter them” by the magazine
The American Review of Reviews
in 1914 and proved vital to the British in World War I by creatingdifficulty in future mobilization of the German fleet
1
. On the other hand, the Battle of the River Plate was victorious for the British in terms of the speedy mobilization of reinforcements despitethe heavy losses so “Commodore Harwood’s tactics proved advantageous” according toEngland’s First Lord of the Admiralty Winston Churchill
2
. In both battles, the Britishoverpowered the German’s significant technological developments with their advanced rapidmobilization and war strategies.The aggressive Anglo-German naval arms race around the North Sea as well as the newlydeveloped war strategies has resulted from
competition of building huge battleships like theDreadnought, [with 10 12-inch guns], because of the ambition of the jealous Kaiser Wilhelm IIand demand from a group in Germany that supported the idea of building up a strong navalforce.”
3
Britain became determined to “maintain its dominance of the seas [that has begin]
1
Shaw, Albert. "The Battle of Heligoland Bight."
 American Review of Reviews
(July-December 1914) 485.
2
Churchill, Winston.
The Second World War: The Gathering Storm
(London: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1986)466.
3
Seung-young, Kim. "Learn from Europe's past."
The International Institute For Strategic Studies JoongAng Daily
.26 Feb 2006. 21 Dec 2009 <http://www.iiss.org/whats-new/iiss-in-the-press/press-coverage-2006/february-2006/learn-from-europes-past/>.
 
Choi 3
since 1815” with its key element as the naval blockade.
4
Thus, the naval blockade helped theBritish navy specialize in speedy long-distance mobilizations. However, even though the naval blockade can create economic hardship for Great Britain’s enemies, it is also very costly in that battleships uses fuel in order to make constant trips from British ports to the German seas innumerous shifts throughout the day. Therefore, once and for all, the British Commodore Roger Keyes had devised a plan with submarines under his command, destroyers under CommodoreReginald Tywhitt, and two battle cruisers. . . to attack German forces around Heligoland in order to impress the Germans.”
5
After Churchill adjusted and approved the plan, it was immediatelyexecuted. When Admiral John Jellicoe learned of the plan at the last minute, he immediatelymobilized three battle cruisers
 Lion, Queen Mary, and Princess Royal 
under Vice Admiral DavidBeatty to reinforce the forces already in combat. This immediate mobilization proved vital to the battle in defeating the German’s superior battleships.On the 30
th
of October, 1914, Jellicoe commented on why he mobilized against German’ssuperior technological developments: “The Germans have shown that they rely to a very greatextent on submarines, mines, and torpedoes, and there can be no doubt whatever that they willendeavour to make the fullest use of these weapons in a fleet action, especially since they possess an actual superiority over us in these particular directions. It, therefore, becomenecessary to consider our own tactical methods in relation to these forms of attack.”
6
Furthermore, in case the technologically advanced German submarines cooperate with theGerman cruisers, Jellicoe stated then the combination “The safeguard against submarines will
4
Osborne, Eric.
The Battle of Heligoland Bight 
. (Indiana: Indiana University Press, 2006) 1.
5
Osborne, intro.
6
Jellicoe, John. “Jellicoe's Letter of October 1914.”
The World War I Document Archive
. 25 Oct 2001. 22 Dec2009 <http://www.gwpda.org/naval/m03177.htm>

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