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Cities of Our Faith-Rome.

Cities of Our Faith-Rome.

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Published by glennpease
By STEPHEN A. CALDWELL.

When Jesus Christ was born, Rome was seven hundred
and fifty-three years old. In that time it had grown from
a little village on the Palatine into a great city with two
millions of people, in fact into the great city of the world.
More than that, by its genius for political organization, it
had first made all Italy part of itself, and then made the
whole Mediterranean basin subject to its rule ; and before
long its provinces stretched from the Euphrates to the
Atlantic, and from the Danube to the Numidian desert.
By STEPHEN A. CALDWELL.

When Jesus Christ was born, Rome was seven hundred
and fifty-three years old. In that time it had grown from
a little village on the Palatine into a great city with two
millions of people, in fact into the great city of the world.
More than that, by its genius for political organization, it
had first made all Italy part of itself, and then made the
whole Mediterranean basin subject to its rule ; and before
long its provinces stretched from the Euphrates to the
Atlantic, and from the Danube to the Numidian desert.

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Published by: glennpease on Feb 21, 2014
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CITIES OF OUR FAITH-ROME. By STEPHEN A. CALDWELL.When Jesus Christ was born, Rome was seven hundred and fifty-three years old. In that time it had grown from a little village on the Palatine into a great city with two millions of people, in fact into the great city of the world. More than that, by its genius for political organization, it had first made all Italy part of itself, and then made the whole Mediterranean basin subject to its rule ; and before long its provinces stretched from the Euphrates to the Atlantic, and from the Danube to the Numidian desert. It had become an Empire, and the Master of the World. It was not yet all it became as a city. Many of the great buildings whose ruins still draw the world to the sight had not yet arisen. But it had organized a system of law which has lasted longer than its most solid structures. It had created a literature only second to that of Greece, and which already was in the splendor of its noon. The wealth of conquest was coming to give it new magnifi-cence. The Republic was past, and the emperors were to enrich it with forums, basilicas, temples, and amphithea-tres, with triumphal arches and columns, with aqueducts and baths, and to replace brick with marble. It was a collumes gentium.. The old Latin and Sabine farmers and traders who lived on its hills would not have felt at
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home with such a mixed crowd of Egyptians and Moors, of Greeks and Asiatics, of Jews, Italians, Iberians, and Gauls, as made its mixed population eight centuries later. At the centre of the Forum, Augustus set a gilded mile-stone, from which went out thirty-one roads to the ends of the Empire. These highways opened the world to Rome for coming and going. The traveller could pass with ease from Cadiz to Byzantium, from Cologne to the cataracts ROME. 77 of the Nile. Over these roads the legions went out to pro-tect the boundaries, and traffic came to bring all luxuries to the capital. Everything and everybody came to Rome,  — Greek artists and rhetoricians, Alexandrian corn-mer-chants, African lion-hunters, Jewish pedlers, captives by thousands to crown a general's triumph, gladiators butch-ered " to make a Roman holiday," curious travellers to see the wonders and enjoy the pleasures of such a city ; here a prisoner like Paul, here a messenger like Phoebe carry-ing his Epistle ; from east and west, from north and south, all sorts of people came to bring something or find some-thing in this metropolis of all the nations. The first fam-ilies, the optimates^ made themselves rich by foreign plun-
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der ; but most of the people were poor, and a million of them slaves, with from six hundred to a thousand sena-tors,^ ten thousand knights, fifteen thousand soldiers ; the rest were " people," the plehs urhana^ a great proletariat, prolific of social danger, and supported at public expense. Of Rome in the making, little is to be said here. There had been a monarchy and a republic, with whatever cloud of myth over its beginnings and early history. The le-gends may pass with whatever kernel of truth was in them. There were patricians and plebeians ; there were Gaulish invasions and Samnite and Punic wars ; there were the struggles of the people with the aristocracy, with victory and assassination to Caesar, the leader of democracy, and the founder of the Empire at last. Enough that Rome began and grew, and at last, as the result of these seven centuries and more, there is a compact life here, a solid city, the city of cities, with wealth, with government, with religion, with the pride of a great history, with the power of a great Empire, with the glory of unconquerable arms. Enough that here is a mighty imperialism beginning the experiment of new centuries of dominion. Enough, above all, that here is a great Rome already made, waiting for a 1 Merivale says five hundred. History of Romans^ i. 62.
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