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The Backpack Farm 2011 Training Manual

The Backpack Farm 2011 Training Manual

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As part of the Suganic family of initiatives, the Backpack Farm facilitates income generation, human resources development, capacity building training, enhanced nutrition models, gender equality, conservation farming and water management techniques to stabilize both food and human security models in Africa’s developing economies.

The Backpack Farm is not simply a kit of materials but a program encompassing five stages of development designed to support the successful launch and expansion of local agriculture cooperatives or “clusterings” by building real capacity. This five (5) phase model includes:

Phase I: Assessment & Mobilization (SCM)
Phase II: Training & Production
Phase III: Production Monitoring & Market Distribution Strategies
Phase IV: Assessment & Risk Management
Phase V: Expansion through Reinvestment (ensuring transparency, sustainability and natural expansion models within rural sector communities).

More than twenty (20) million people in the East Africa region are food insecure, due mainly to the cumulative effects of drought, conflict, market disruptions and trans-boundary animal diseases. In marginal agricultural areas food insecurity continues to deteriorate. The number of food insecure will increase until the next rainy season in October/November 2009. Poor rural and urban households who are market dependant will continue to face high food prices that have reduced market access to food, especially during the lean season. Food shortages are also impacted by trade bans of essential grains. Most important is the affect this crisis is having on East Africa’s children from both underweight and chronic malnutrition directly affecting those 0-59 months of age.

Ethiopia: 39%
Eritrea: 40%
Kenya: 20%
Sudan: 30%
Tanzania: 22%
Uganda: 20%

The potential to establish food security in the main agricultural areas does will remain favorable. With more than 100 million small landholder farmers in East Africa, agricultural commercial agriculture cooperatives can act as a realistic solution to the region’s food insecurity.

Cooperatives are enterprises structured around the individual, functioning for the whole, and helping to propel both markets and societies into self determined prosperity. Subsistence farming is not the answer to establishing long term food or economic security in rural communities. Small scale “kitchen” farming only embeds new cycles of poverty in developing and post conflict regions.

Community development needs to be based in programs designed to meet long term objectives by implementing farming models exponentially increase agricultural production and empower cooperation within local communities to leverage socially responsible brands and reinvestment potential. Planning must include a diversity of training and monitoring to ensure concepts of production and quality are institutionalized within agricultural developments programs.
As part of the Suganic family of initiatives, the Backpack Farm facilitates income generation, human resources development, capacity building training, enhanced nutrition models, gender equality, conservation farming and water management techniques to stabilize both food and human security models in Africa’s developing economies.

The Backpack Farm is not simply a kit of materials but a program encompassing five stages of development designed to support the successful launch and expansion of local agriculture cooperatives or “clusterings” by building real capacity. This five (5) phase model includes:

Phase I: Assessment & Mobilization (SCM)
Phase II: Training & Production
Phase III: Production Monitoring & Market Distribution Strategies
Phase IV: Assessment & Risk Management
Phase V: Expansion through Reinvestment (ensuring transparency, sustainability and natural expansion models within rural sector communities).

More than twenty (20) million people in the East Africa region are food insecure, due mainly to the cumulative effects of drought, conflict, market disruptions and trans-boundary animal diseases. In marginal agricultural areas food insecurity continues to deteriorate. The number of food insecure will increase until the next rainy season in October/November 2009. Poor rural and urban households who are market dependant will continue to face high food prices that have reduced market access to food, especially during the lean season. Food shortages are also impacted by trade bans of essential grains. Most important is the affect this crisis is having on East Africa’s children from both underweight and chronic malnutrition directly affecting those 0-59 months of age.

Ethiopia: 39%
Eritrea: 40%
Kenya: 20%
Sudan: 30%
Tanzania: 22%
Uganda: 20%

The potential to establish food security in the main agricultural areas does will remain favorable. With more than 100 million small landholder farmers in East Africa, agricultural commercial agriculture cooperatives can act as a realistic solution to the region’s food insecurity.

Cooperatives are enterprises structured around the individual, functioning for the whole, and helping to propel both markets and societies into self determined prosperity. Subsistence farming is not the answer to establishing long term food or economic security in rural communities. Small scale “kitchen” farming only embeds new cycles of poverty in developing and post conflict regions.

Community development needs to be based in programs designed to meet long term objectives by implementing farming models exponentially increase agricultural production and empower cooperation within local communities to leverage socially responsible brands and reinvestment potential. Planning must include a diversity of training and monitoring to ensure concepts of production and quality are institutionalized within agricultural developments programs.

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Published by: Michael Tekhen Strode on Feb 21, 2014
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/12/2015

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THE BACKPACK FARM AGRICULTURE PROGRAMKuza 2011 Training Manual
 
f   r  i    c  a  s  f    e  e  d  i     g   a f   r  i    c 
Introduction3Our partners4Fusion farming5
Part one
 
6Soil, cover crops, bed preparation & crop rotation
Part two
13Water management
Part three
34Pesticides & crop protection
Part four
38Pests & diseases: Aphids, mites, white flies, boll worms, blight & antracnose.
Part five
44Plant stress, are your crops tired?
Part six
46The harvest & record keeping
Part seven
49The organic goodies
Part eight
55Sanitation & health
contents
2
 
Jambo...
Our daily lives are intertwined around food and water but access to these fundamental man human rights continues to be a challenge for the majority of citizens in East and Sub-Saharan Africa. As a result, we have created a dependency on international food affecting more than 14 million people in the Horn of Africa. Simultaneously, current global food production is insufficient to provide an alternative to international food aid and global food prices continue to increase. The world needs to grow more food! The solution exists in the fertile earth of East and Sub-Saharan Africa with the potential not only to feed itself but the world. Developing the agriculture sector is essential to the continual establishment of peace and security in the region. Kofi Annan stated during the 2010 World Food Conference, "improving the productivity, profitability, and sustainability of smallholder farming is the main pathway out of poverty in using agriculture for development." The team working behind the scenes at the Backpack Farm Agriculture Program (BPF) enthusiastically agrees. The BPF program provides not just biological farming supplements and training but a complete 5 phase program ensuring smallholder farmers to increase their harvests and improve their qualities of life. In combination, it is possible to achieve sustainable linkages in food production, value chains, credible finance, income generation, social and ecological domains. We are committed to supporting smallholder farmers with innovative, “green” agri-tech, training and extension services to enhance both the quality and quantity of agriculture production during an annual growing season, to mirror semi-commercial rates of production. Our New Campaign, “Kuza” (Cultivate / Grow in Swahili) is committed to finding farming solutions to “growing food, communities and children” in Africa’s rural agriculture communities. The first step to alleviating hunger and accomplishing global food security is to share information. We hope by sharing this agriculture (TOT) training manual, we will inspire other organization whether non profit, academic, donor funded or commercial social enterprise to connect with each other and incubate sustainable and scalable production models to leverage Africa’s most underutilized resources, its farmers! I and my team look forward to sharing ideas and incubating new solutions to feed the world!
 Rachel ZedeckManaging Director & Chief Catalyst3

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