Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
0Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
"Course Portfolio Description" by Robertson et al. (Kairos 19.1 Praxis)

"Course Portfolio Description" by Robertson et al. (Kairos 19.1 Praxis)

Ratings:
(0)
|Views: 39|Likes:
Published by KairosEditors
This explanation of a portfolio project provides an example of how a multimodal writing course that uses multimodal instruction might be structured for a semester-long online writing course. It is part of a webtext published in the Praxis section of the Fall 2014 (19.1) issue of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy. Kairos is a free, online, peer-reviewed scholarly journal available at http://kairos.technorhetoric.net.
This explanation of a portfolio project provides an example of how a multimodal writing course that uses multimodal instruction might be structured for a semester-long online writing course. It is part of a webtext published in the Praxis section of the Fall 2014 (19.1) issue of Kairos: A Journal of Rhetoric, Technology, and Pedagogy. Kairos is a free, online, peer-reviewed scholarly journal available at http://kairos.technorhetoric.net.

More info:

Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: KairosEditors on Feb 23, 2014
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

02/23/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Portfolio for First-Year Composition
In lieu of a final exam, you will construct a course portfolio that directly addresses how you have met the learning outcomes of the course. You will do this by making a reflective claim and using evidence from the course. Your portfolio will be housed in a Google Site.
The Tasks
The assignment asks you to perform two major tasks: 1.
 
Using areas of the “WPA Outcomes Statement for First-Year Composition” as a guide, make the following assertion: “Here’s what I have learned about writing this semester.” 2.
 
For each skill or area of knowledge that you include in your assertions, provide evidence that you have learned what you claim to have learned. The “evidence” that you provide will come from the writing and other activities that you do this semester; use examples from those texts and activities to show what you learned.
Helpful Hints
1.
 
 As you work on your portfolio, you will find helpful guidance and a student example in “Appendix A: Constructing a Writing Portfolio” in
The McGraw-Hill Guide 
. 2.
 
I strongly encourage you to use the bulleted items in the “WPA Outcomes Statement for First-Year Composition” as subheadings in your portfolio. This will help you generate material for the portfolio. (The learning outcomes are on the course syllabus, which makes it easy to cut-and-paste the bulleted items into your portfolio file.) 3.
 
For each project in the class, you will write a reflection, so I encourage you to start using moving your reflections to the portfolio, starting with the first project. 4.
 
Consider the following items as sources of evidence for your portfolio: excerpts from final versions of writing projects, drafts of projects, invention work, transcripts of peer-review sessions, marginalia that you have written in your textbook, external material that you have found on the Web in other media. 5.
 
Because first-year composition is designed to help you write more effectively in the academic, professional, civic, and personal arenas of your life, feel free to use writing from outside this course in your portfolio. It is also useful to explain how you can use writing in these arenas. 6.
 
To construct the portfolio, you will be using Google Sites. See the course calendar for checkpoints throughout the semester for feedback on your portfolio.
 
WPA Outcomes Statement for First-Year Composition
WPA Outcomes (http://wpacouncil.org/positions/outcomes.html)
Rhetorical Knowledge
By the end of first-year composition, students should
 
 
Focus on a purpose
 
Respond to the needs of different audiences
 
Respond appropriately to different kinds of rhetorical situations
 
Use conventions of format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation
 
 Adopt appropriate voice, tone, and level of formality
 
Understand how genres shape reading and writing
 
Write in several genres
Critical Thinking Reading and Writing
By the end of first-year composition, students should
 
Use writing and reading for inquiry, learning, thinking, and communicating
 
Understand a writing assignment as a series of tasks, including finding, evaluating, analyzing, and synthesizing appropriate primary and secondary sources
 
Integrate their own ideas with those of others
 
Understand the relationships among language, knowledge, and power
Processes
By the end of first year composition, students should
 
Be aware that it usually takes multiple drafts to create and complete a successful text
 
Develop flexible strategies for generating, revising, editing, and proof-reading
 
Understand writing as an open process that permits writers to use later invention and re-thinking to revise their work
 
Understand the collaborative and social aspects of writing processes
 
Learn to critique their own and others' works
 
Learn to balance the advantages of relying on others with the responsibility of doing their part
 
Use a variety of technologies to address a range of audiences

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->