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BEST Advice I got-famous people-cnn.com

BEST Advice I got-famous people-cnn.com

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Published by tejkhanna2009
The document from www.money.cnn.com dated June 2009 is a little advice from a bevy of famous personalities from different fields. The advice of these influential leaders is highly motivating. The leaders include Tiger Woods, Mort Zuckerman, Lloyd Blankfein, Mohamed El-Erian, Tory Burch, Jim Rogers, Scott Boras, Colin Powell, Sukhinder Singh Cassidy, Eric Schmidt, Meredith Whitney, and Thomas Keller.

It helps people get vast experience from rich experience.
The document from www.money.cnn.com dated June 2009 is a little advice from a bevy of famous personalities from different fields. The advice of these influential leaders is highly motivating. The leaders include Tiger Woods, Mort Zuckerman, Lloyd Blankfein, Mohamed El-Erian, Tory Burch, Jim Rogers, Scott Boras, Colin Powell, Sukhinder Singh Cassidy, Eric Schmidt, Meredith Whitney, and Thomas Keller.

It helps people get vast experience from rich experience.

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categoriesBusiness/Law, Finance
Published by: tejkhanna2009 on Oct 10, 2009
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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02/06/2013

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BEST ADVICE I EVER GOT!
In a world of uncertainty, we could all use a little advice. So we asked a host ofinfluential leaders to share with us the wise words that changed their livesforever.
money.cnn.com, June 2009 
Tiger Woods: Keep it simple
Age:
33
No. 1-ranked golfer 
 When I was young, maybe 6 or 7 years old, I'd play on the Navy golf course with my pop. Mydad would say, "Okay, where do you want to hit the ball?" I'd pick a spot and say I want to hitit there. He'd shrug and say, "Fine, then figure out how to do it." He didn't position my arm,adjust my feet, or change my thinking. He just said go ahead and hit the darn ball. My dad'sadvice to me was to simplify. He knew that at my age I couldn't digest all of golf's intricacies.He kept it simple: If you want to hit the ball to a particular spot, figure out a way to do it. Eventoday, when I'm struggling with my game, I can still hear him say, "Pick a spot and just hit it."When I'm making adjustments during a round, I know some of the television commentatorstheorize that I'm changing this or moving that, but really what I'm doing is listening to Pop.
 
Jim Sinegal: Show, don't tell
Age:
73
Co-founder and CEO, Costco Wholesale 
 About 40 years ago I became a vice president at FedMart, a discount retailer. I startedworking there when I was 18. The company's founder, Sol Price, taught me a lesson thatwas pretty simple, but also true: If you're going to go to the trouble of hiring someone, it'sbecause you can't do the job yourself -- so you'd better show them how you would do it.Sol spent day and night teaching us. He'd go home to have dinner, then come back to thewarehouses. If he saw a piece of trash on the floor, he'd pick it up. If he noticed that adisplay was too high or an aisle wasn't wide enough, he'd fix it. As employees, we weretested every day, and if something wasn't done properly, he'd be certain to show us how todo it. Some people believe that you should say something just once. But I think you get amessage across by communicating it every day. That's why I'm always walking the floors ofdifferent Costcos and talking to employees about the tasks at hand. It's not just because Ilove to hear the registers ring! Sol taught me that a good manager must also be a goodteacher. A lot of very bright people lose sight of that.
 
Mort Zuckerman: Do what you love
Age:
72
Chairman, Boston Properties; chairman, editor-in-chief,
U.S. News and World ReportThe best advice I ever got came from one of my professors at the Harvard Business School.He told a story about how George Bernard Shaw was working as a clerk in a dry-goods storein Dublin, and he decided to give himself three years to go and write plays in London. And ifit didn't work out he could always go back and be a clerk in a dry-goods store. The way Iinterpreted his advice was to really do what you love. I was anticipating that I would bepracticing law, which to me was the functional equivalent to working as a clerk in a dry-goodsstore.So I decided I was going to give myself three years to try something that I was alwaysinterested in. I was always fascinated by urban life, and I grew up in Montreal, where theresidential areas were closer to the downtown part of the city. The father of one of my bestfriends was in the real estate business, and I thought he had a wonderful life because hetraveled a lot and seemed to be building things. And I really liked building things. (And as Ionce said when I was a teacher, he also had a lot of women chasing him, which I thoughtcame out of the profession. A student then asked me, "Well, has it worked?" And I said,"Well, I travel an awful lot.") So I went into a field that I really liked. I got a job in Boston withCabot Cabot & Forbes, in real estate development. Since I loved both urban life and journalism -- I was a journalism addict when I was 12 years old -- all I did was pursue thosetwo careers. And I feel as if I've never worked a day in my life.

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