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THE ARK.

THE ARK.

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Published by glennpease
REV. JONATHAN BAYLEY

WE Come now to another important portion of oof subject, in
considering the meaning and the circumstances of the flood. If
m have given satiafactoiy reasons for coosidering the flood Itself
to hare been such a deluge as threatens the aonl of eyery man
at some part of hU spirit's history, and was pecoliarly terrible
¦t the end of the best and earliest church which prevailed among
mankind, we shall find still further confirmation in pursoing the
other portions of the divine narrative.
REV. JONATHAN BAYLEY

WE Come now to another important portion of oof subject, in
considering the meaning and the circumstances of the flood. If
m have given satiafactoiy reasons for coosidering the flood Itself
to hare been such a deluge as threatens the aonl of eyery man
at some part of hU spirit's history, and was pecoliarly terrible
¦t the end of the best and earliest church which prevailed among
mankind, we shall find still further confirmation in pursoing the
other portions of the divine narrative.

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Published by: glennpease on Feb 25, 2014
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THE ARK.REV. JONATHAN BAYLEY WE Come now to another important portion of oof subject, in considering the meaning and the circumstances of the flood. If m have given satiafactoiy reasons for coosidering the flood Itself to hare been such a deluge as threatens the aonl of eyery man at some part of hU spirit's history, and was pecoliarly terrible ¦t the end of the best and earliest church which prevailed among mankind, we shall find still further confirmation in pursoing the other portions of the divine narrative. We are now also very bvonrably situated for our present ailment, for we are able to oompare the capabilities of the ark to afford comfortable accom-modation for its hnman and bestial inhabitants, as illustrated hj the great ship, the Great Eastern, now being prepared in the ThaoMS. This vessel is nearly a fourth larger than the ark, its tonnage bdng 22,500, and that of the ark 18,000 tons. One general principle, which we think will hardly be dLipntcd, we venture to assume ; which is this, That if God provided a reiiige from the flood, it would be a proper and satisfiictorj- one. He does all things welt. If the ark was a natural ship, it would be constructed on the best principle: there would be size enough, light enough, and air enough to accommodate all whom it was designed to contain. If it does not answer these requirements, when the history is literally understood, is it not wiaer to ask if
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the sacred writing has not some other meaning, rather than either reject it as the word of God, or to reject our reason in matters of religion, and thus lay ourselves open to any absurdity, however wild P It is tme a person may say. That God, bein^ aU-\«»"K«ttA, conid pat anj" number of animals and t\ie.w tool Nb'w "vV*. w£«-i 610 THB DIVINE WORD OPENED. whether it was large enough or not. Bat with snch reaaoning it would be imposHible to shew that there was any need of an ark at all. The animals might have been kept safe and snog at the bottom of the sea as well as in an ark that would not hold them. A gentleman who had overlooked the divine invitatioii, '^ Come now, and let us reason together, saith the Lord," — Isa. i. 18, once remarked in a sermon : '^ God could have put all tlie animals of the earth in a thimble if he had thought fit ; '' bnt such a pe|^on would find it very difficult to object when a priest of another faith told him that God the Saviour puts Himself soul, body, and divinity, into the wafer that lies on the commu-nicant's tongue. Such persons affect to disdain reason, and yet it is remarkable how readily they hold with it when they suppose they can use it in their own favour. In fiact, religion is not only
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the best, but the most reasonable thing in the world. It is light for the mind. And when any one proves his doctrine or view of Holy Writ is not reasonable, he proves it to be not true, not from God. When a reader, who thinks only naturally, reads that God commanded Noah to make an ark to save him when the flood came, he mentally says, Yes, that was very right, very proper, very reasonable ; and he is satisfied. But if he finds on further examination that the ark would not hold the animals, or was totally unfit to sustain life, would he not be impelled to think there must be some other way of understanding the narra-tive rather than that he ought to attribute anything absurd to the All- wise Creator? This, then, is precisely the view we wish to enforce. Let not any one imagine, that in proposing difficulti^ in regard to the letter of the Word, if natiutilly understood, we in the slightest degree wish to lessen his esteem for it as a reve-lation fi-om God. We only say as the apostle did. Here, " The letter killeth, but the spirit giveth life." — 2 Cor. iii. 6. When we rise from the letter to the spirit we shall rise to a perception of the true wisdom of the Word, as we have never seen it bdbre. We shall see that the thoughts of God are as much higher than our thoughts, as heaven is higher than the earth. We have mentioned in our discourse on the flood, that to suppose it took place literally, we must not only admit that one miracle was wrought, but such a crowd of miracles that the mind staggers at their number and character. And when we
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