Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
3Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
UPKNYC-2014-0003_FINAL

UPKNYC-2014-0003_FINAL

Ratings: (0)|Views: 3,755 |Likes:
Published by Nick Reisman

More info:

Published by: Nick Reisman on Feb 25, 2014
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/04/2014

pdf

text

original

 
MAKE
UNIVERSAL PRE󰀭K
& QUALITY
 AFTER󰀭SCHOOL PROGRAMS
A REALITY IN
NEW YORK CITY 
upknyc.orgupknyc.org /upknyc @upknyc
TOGETHER WE CAN MAKE FULL󰀭DAY PRE󰀭K & AFTER󰀭SCHOOL PROGRAMS A REALITY.IT’S TIME.
PRE󰀭KTHE UPKNYC PLANCURRENT STATE PROPOSAL
How much new money per year would be available for pre-K?
$341.6 million, citywide$100 million in the 1st year
statewideHow much money per student are the plans assuming?
$10,239Not specied
How many full-day seats would the plans create?
73,250Not specied
How would each plan be paid for?
Dedicated, stable progressive tax on wealthy NYC residents Existing money within the budget
 AFTER󰀭SCHOOLTHE UPKNYC PLANCURRENT STATE PROPOSAL
How much money per year would be available for after-school?
 
$190 million per year for NYC$0 for the first year, $160 million for the 2nd year, $200 million thereafter
statewideHow much money per student are the plans assuming?
 
$1,600 per childNot specified
How many new after-school seats would the plans create?
 
Universal: 120,000 childrenNot specified
How would each plan be paid for?
Dedicated, stable progressive tax on wealthy NYC residents Projected revenue from taxes on casinos that still have to be built
FUNDING CHOICES: TWO PLANS FOR PRE󰀭KINDERGARTEN & AFTER󰀭SCHOOL
 
 UPK
NYC | 
43
NEARLY THREE-QUARTERS OF FOUR-YEAR-OLDS LACK ACCESS TO FULL-DAY UPK.
Today in New York City, most children enrolled in pre-K receive only half-day instruction, and according to the U.S. Census, more than a quarter of New York City’s four-year-olds are not enrolled in any early education programs at all.
MOST MIDDLE󰀭SCHOOLERS DON’T HAVE  ACCESS TO AFTER󰀭SCHOOL.
Tens of thousands of middle-school students have no access to quality after-school programming, despite what we know about the importance of extended learning in the critical middle school years.
TRULY UNIVERSAL FULL󰀭DAY PRE󰀭K & QUALITY AFTER󰀭SCHOOL.
The City of New York is moving aggressively to implement a truly universal pre-kindergarten system in New York City that provides every four-year-old with high-quality, full-day pre-K and to expand after-school by 120,000 middle-school slots. These efforts have been guided by the deep expertise of city agencies, best practices from our community-based organizations, and decades of academic research that has proven high-quality pre-K is among the most effective ways to reduce economic inequality.
REALISTIC PLAN FOR EXPEDITED ROLLOUT.
A thorough analysis by city agencies and a working group of non-profit childcare providers has determined that New York City is prepared to provide free, high-quality, full-day pre-K to the 73,250 children who require it by the 2015-2016 school year, beginning with 53,804 in September 2014.
THE NEED FOR MULTI-YEAR, GUARANTEED FUNDING.
The limitations to rapid expansion are not personnel or space or a vision for high-quality instruction and
 
KEY FACTS  AND FIGURES
 
TOTAL NEED:
The projected enrollment in high-quality, universal pre-K is 73,250. Only 19,483 four-year-olds receive full-day UPK.
 
FIRST YEAR SCALE󰀭UP:
New York City is prepared to provide free, high-quality, full-day pre-K to 53,804 children in September 2014.
 
COST PER CHILD:
Bringing all 73,250 full-day pre-K seats up to high-quality standards will cost an average of $10,239 per child.
 
TOTAL COSTS:
Expanding the program to reach all four-year-olds will cost $340 million, with $97 million dedicated to start-up infrastructure and costs required to upgrade program quality.professional development—the fundamental challenge is sufficient, sustainable funding.
 A SMALL CITY TAX WOULD PROVIDE DEDICATED REVENUE.
In the first year, the funds raised by a temporary Personal Income Tax increase on the city’s highest earners will be used to increase the number of seats available, upgrade existing seats, and support the expansion of necessary infrastructure, such as curriculum development and improved initiatives for training and ongoing support. In subsequent years, the funds generated will be dedicated to operations.
PROGRAM OVERVIEW.
 
Too many of our kids don’t get the start they need to succeed.  A tax on the wealthiest New Yorkers will enable us to
 provide full-day pre-K and after-school  programs to put all our kids on the right path.
– Mayor Bill de Blasio
 
 UPK
NYC | 
65
THE RESEARCH IS CLEAR.
 AFTER-SCHOOL HAS GREAT REWARDS.
Every day, tens of thousands of middle-school students in New York City leave school unattended in the afternoon, missing out on key educational opportunities and putting themselves at risk for making poor decisions. Studies show that the time between 3 and 6 p.m. are the peak hours for juvenile crime and experimentation with drugs, alcohol, cigarettes, and sex. 
High-quality extended-day learning can be enormously beneficial to at-risk youth:
 
High-quality after-school programs can lead to students’ improved attendance, behavior, coursework, and test scores compared to their peers. (Durlak 2010)
 
Teens who do not participate in after-school programs are nearly three times more likely to skip classes than teens who do and three times more likely
INVESTMENT IN PRE-K PAYS OFF.
Publicly financed pre-K would significantly reduce the segment of the population that in the long run will be poor—from almost 36% to about 29%—and boost the college graduation rate for children whose parents didn’t attend a university from about 10% to almost 14%. (Heckman 2006)For every dollar invested in pre-K, we see between $4 and $9 in benefits through reduced costs in special education, welfare, and crime, as well as the increased economic activity of pre-K graduates. A study by the Minneapolis Federal Reserve Bank found that early education investments far exceed the return on investment of other economic development projects. (Center on the Developing Child 2014; Grunewald 2003)
HIGH QUALITY AFTER󰀭SCHOOL PROGRAMS ARE PROVEN TO ACCELERATE STUDENT ACHIEVEMENT:
       P     e     r     c     e     n      t       i       l     e
C
oursework
Students do better
B
ehavior
Students behave better
 A 
ttendance
Students are more likely to come to school
Improved Attendance
6
Positive School Behaviors
11
Reduction in Problem Behavior
12
School Grades
9
Test Scores
8
to use marijuana or other drugs, drink, smoke, or engage in sexual activity. (YMCA 2001)
 
The Promising After-School Programs Study also concluded that regular attendance in after-school programs is linked to significant gains in standardized test scores, work habits, and reductions in behavior problems among disadvantaged students. (Vandell 2007)
 
Data from 21st CCLC programs show students participating in their programs raise their math (37%) and English (38%) grades, improve their homework completion and class participation (72%) as well as their behavior in class (67%). (Learning Points Assoc. 2011) After-school is key for parents and employers too: A study by Brandeis University found parents miss an average of five work days per year because of a lack of after-school programming for their kids. The lost work time costs the economy up to $300 billion per year. (Catalyst 2006)
(Source: Expanded Learning and Afterschool Project)
THE LONG󰀭TERM BENEFITS OF INVESTING IN EARLY EDUCATION FAR EXCEED THE MONEY SPENT.
The long-term benefits of investing in early education far exceed the money spent. Investing in children early avoids costly outcomes like incarceration, special education, teen pregnancy, and future low earnings. (Goolsbee 2013)Model state pre-school programs in Georgia and Oklahoma boosted math scores for low-income children as late as eighth grade and increased the odds that their mothers would work and that they’d spend quality time with their children. (Cascio 2013)

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->