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193906 Desert Magazine 1939 June

193906 Desert Magazine 1939 June

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Published by: dm1937 on Feb 21, 2008
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THE
M A G A ZN E
 
Carson's Camp,Bishop, CaliforniaDear Sir:We had a pleasant trip in your desert coun-try this spring, and quite a successful one. Wewent up to the geode area north of Twenty-nine Palms and found some very good speci-mens. We also found "hammer hounds" hadbeen there before us and destroyed hundredsof fine stones. In some places there were pilesof pulverized rock where there had beengeodes. How can we educate the public todesist from this sort of vandalism? Some peo-ple ought not be allowed to carry a hammerinto the desert.Although I nearly lost my life in the Mo-jave desert in 1915 I still love it. I spentseveral months there with the late Lou Wes-cott Beck, who was a very dear friend of mine,and who at one time was called "the GoodSamaritan of the Desert." He spent a greatdeal of time and money marking poison waterholes and springs in what at that time was atrackless waste. To my certain knowledge Becksaved the lives of no less than 20 men in thatcountry. His knowledge of the desert wasalmost uncanny. No finer man ever lived, asmany old-timers will tell you.Thanking you for your kindness to us whilewe were in El Centro and wishing you everykind of success with the Desert Magazine, Iam very sincerelyDAD CARSON.Los Angeles, CaliforniaDear Desert Folks:I am so grateful that the cacti have thornsso that humans cannot wade through themwith their dirty shoes and pull the delicateblooms—and then leave them to wither anddie.Thank you for your wonderful magazine.BERTHA CLAYPOOL COSSITT;Tucumcari, New MexicoDear Editor:The poems in the March Desert Magazinewere exquisite. My son went into ecstasiesover the SUNSET poem of Mr. Brininstool's.It is truly beautiful. But I enjoyed all thepoetry. The little four line verse CLOSE OFDAY conveys a beautiful picture.Some folks who do not aspire to writepoetry themselves, nevertheless enjoy readingit very much. Poetry speaks to the soul in away that prose cannot. It is the flower ofliterature.MRS. S. F. ANDERSON.Beatty, NevadaDear Sir:I am a prospector and have had a lot ofexperience hunting up lost people—nine ofthem I think and some of them have beenterrible.I would like to go and see if I can findEverett Ruess. I certainly could find his lastcamp and might find his remains. I foundHarry Mahoney, the Hollister, California, boyin '27, and Norman D. Carr in '36, lost inForty Mile canyon 45 miles out of Beatty,Nevada.I was through that Utah country in 1937and would like to get some facts about thecase before starting. I take my own equipmentand travel alone and take my time. If you willtell me where I can get the desired informa-tion, and no one objects, I will go. I thinkthe 10th of August will be about right. Whatmonth was Everett lost in ?I am over in the Panamints prospecting atpresent.DEATH VALLEY CURLY.
Curly was given the information.
editor.
n
Rankin, IllinoisDear Mr. Henderson:Since 1935 we have made two trips to thePacific coast. While a tourist sees much, hemisses more as "Stopovers" are generally ofshort duration. Your Desert Magazine sup-plies the missing link and makes the West agrand reality.In the May issue on the "Just Between Youand Me" page I read your suggestion to in-clude the Vallecito and Carrizo desert areasin the new Anza Desert State Park. I amadding my plea also to save this wonderfulwork of nature for your eastern neighbors aswell as future generations of this great coun-try.As the Wisconsins are very proud of theirDells, I am making a correction in the inter-esting article "Margaret Lewis—Singer andSilversmith" by Mrs. White Mountain Smith.The Dells and the Winnebago tribe are situ-ated in Wisconsin instead of Minnesota. Hav-ing spent a vacation in that region, we at-tended the Indian Ceremonial dances at theancient Stand Rock amphitheater. Severaltribes of Indians from the Southwest were inevidence. Margaret Lewis (Laughing Eyes)took a prominent part.I have a complete file of your wonderfulmagazine and hope to add many more.MRS.A. C. DROLL.Dear Sir:Los Angeles, California"The flowers that bloom in the Spring, trala" and all that sort of rot, eh what! Springhas already donned her Easter outfit — aglorious — royal garment of gold and pur-ple.When Spring covers the desert's drab,stark nakedness with the luxurious Cinderellacloak, then it's time to ramble desertward. Itis wise to hurry to get there ahead of others.In fact, it is necessary to go early if the car isto be filled with blossoms.All desert visitors should tear the plantsup by the roots, because if first-comers don'tothers will; so it's best to grab while thegrabbing is good. Of course, if the flowers diebefore home is reached, it's all right.It's easy enough to dump them out whenthe paved residential district is reached. Thestreet cleaners can sweep them up. What dopeople pay taxes for anyway?In the Spring, the sap runs in the plants,and Whoops! the saps run to rip up the plantsthat spring up in the Spring, tra la.EDNA P. PATTEN.Quito, EcuadorDear Sirs:Being interested to read your useful andinteresting publication, THE DESERT MAG-AZINE, I am addressing you today in orderto request that you please send me, by returnmail a copy of your magazine, for my promptperusal and consideration.If after reading your publication I see thatI can obtain some information there shall beno delay in sending my subscription order forsome years.G. A. MORENO.Glendale, CaliforniaDear Mr. Henderson:As a regular reader of the Desert Magazinesince its first issue may I say that it is themost interesting publication in its field thatwe have seen.I was much interested to learn through thelast issue of your questions and answers, andalso the list of suggestions mentioned. So mayI as a sincere friend to you and the DesertMagazine express my reaction to one of thesuggestions.I firmly believe that if you include a fictiondepartment you will adulterate the characterof "Desert, " and waste its charm. As onelooks at the so-called newsstands, displayinghundreds of magazines filled with fiction(trash of all kinds) there is no crying needfor any more of it. For those who want itthe supply seems already unlimited.The value and appeal of "Desert" is that itcomes like an intimate and personal letterfrom that lovely and truly indefinable thing ofbeauty, awe, grandeur, vastness, peace andquiet which we call the desert.Your effort and success in collecting andprinting so many fine things for us is deeplyappreciated, so don't enlarge it at the expenseof its character. Such books as "Desert" and"National Geographic" would soon lose theiridentity if they imitated ordinary publications.Vandalism defaces the beautiful and pol-lutes the pure. So please keep the DesertMagazine pure.L. V. MARTIN.El Centro, CaliforniaDear Mr. Henderson:In connection with the evaporative coolingsystem article in the last "Desert," it mightbe of interest to know that the passengertrains in India have for years been cooledthat way.In the hot weather burlap blinds are letdown outside the windows, with a stream ofwater trickling down on them from the roofof the car. The movement of the train makesan effective "fan."Praise for the sustained high standard of"Desert" becomes almost an impertinence—one takes it so for granted now. With bestwishes.AUBREY M. DRAPER.Rowood, ArizonaGentlemen:I am sending you under separate cover somedata on the Papago country. I notice you hada picture of the Ventana. With reference toit being three miles east of the Papago vil-lage of San Miguel. I beg to differ with thestatement in Mr. Jones' letter in your Mayissue.The Ventana lies about 40 miles northwestof San Miguel. Also, in regard to Bavoquivaripeak—I will give you the definition of thename.
Bavac
means cliff in the Papago langu-age and
quivol
means belt—hence the Belted
Cliff.
You will notice the white streak aroundthe bottom of the
cliff,
which explains thename.THOMAS CHILDS.Tucson, ArizonaEditor, Desert Magazine:I thought I knew my desert pretty well un-til I tried to answer the questions in yourDesert Quiz. I got 11 of them right. Give ussome more of them—it is evident that eventhe old-timers can learn something about theirown country from the Desert Magazine.DAN McSTAY.
 
DESERT
MAY27-28—Utah State Press associ-ation meets
at
Moab with MoabLions club
as
host.27-28—Closing dates
of the
annu-al flower show exhibited eachweekend during May
at
Julian,California.27-28—Annual fiesta
at Old Al-
buquerque, New Mexico.31 New Mexico state P.E.O.convention begins
at
Roswell.
JUNE
7-10—Junior
Fat
stock show
un-
der auspices Salt Lake chamberof commerce
at
North Salt Lake,Utah.16-17—District convention
of
UtahLions
at
Vernal, Utah.21 —Palm Springs, California,to vote
on
question
of
disincor-poration.24 —San Juan's Day
to be ob-
served
by
festivities
at
San JuanPueblo, New Mexico.24-25—Los Angeles Cactus
and
Succulent show
at
Manchesterplayground
in
Los Angeles. Freeto public.
APRIL REPORT FROM
U. S.
BUREAUAT PHOENIXTemperatures— DegreesMean
for
month
71.2
Normal
for
April
67.0
High
on
April
22 99.
Low
on
April
15 44.
Rain— InchesTotal
for
month
0.17
Normal
for
April
0.40
Weather-Days clear
16
Days partly cloudy
10
Days cloudy
4
G.
K.
GREENING, Meteorologist.FROM YUMA BUREAUTemperatures— DegreesMean
for
month
73-8
Ncrmal
for
April
69-5
High
on
April
21 102.
Low
on
April
15 46.
Rain— InchesTotal
for
month Trace69-year-average
for
April
0.10
Weather-Days clear
27
Days partly cloudy
3
Days cloudy
- 0
Sunshine
97
percent (379 hours
out of
possi-ble 390 hours).Colorado river—April discharge
at
GrandCanyon
1,214,000
acre feet. Discharge
at
Parker 588,000 acre feet. Estimated storageMay
1,
behind Boulder
dam
21,900,000acre feet.JAMES
H.
GORDON, Meteorologist.
Volume
2
JUNE, 1939 Number
8
COVER
SAGUARO BLOSSOM, Photograph
by
Claireand Ralph Proctor
of
Phoenix, Arizona.
LETTERS
From
the
readers
of
Desert Magazine, Inside cover
CALENDAR
June events
on the
desert
1
WEATHER
April temperatures
on
the desert
1
PHOTOGRAPHY
Prize winning pictures
in
April
2
INDIANS
Saguaro Harvest
in
PapagolandBy RUBY BOWEN
3
GEMS
Rainbow Stones
in
the Santa RosasBy JOHN
W.
HILTON
6
VAGABOND
With Archaeologists
at
Basketmaker CaveBy EVERETT RUESS
9
CAMERA ART
"Feel"
of
the DesertPhotograph
by
WM.
M.
PENNINGTON
... 11
ADVENTURE
Up Snow Creek
to
the Cairn
on
San JacintoBy RUTH DYAR
12
PHOTOGRAPHY
Gypsy With
a
CameraBy RANDALL HENDERSON
16
LEGEND
Canyon JourneyAs told
to
HARRY
C.
JAMES
17
PRIZES
Announcement
of
photographic contest for June
. 18
ARTIST
Keetsie—Navajo ArtistBy ADRIAN HOWARD
19
DEVELOPMENT
Dream
of a
Desert ParadiseBy TAZE
and
JESSIE LAMB
22
PUZZLE
Desert Quiz—A test
of
your knowledgeof
the
Southwest
28
HOBBY
Hobbyist
of
SalomeBy LOIS ELDER STEINER
29
PROGRESS
More Efficient Coolers
for
the DesertBy
L. G.
TANDBERG
32
FICTION
Hard Rock Shorty
of
Death ValleyBy LON GARRISON
34
MINING
Briefs from the desert region
34
CONTRIBUTORS
Writers
of
the Desert
35
LANDMARK
Prize contest
for
June
37
NEWS
Here and There
on
the Desert
38
PLACE NAMES
Origin
of
names
in
the Southwest
40
BOOKS
Curreni reviews
42
POETRY
"Me an' My Burro" and other poems
43
COMMENT
Just Between You and Meby the Editor
...
44
The Desert Magazine is published monthly by the Desert Publishing Company, 597State Street, El Centro, California. Entered as second class matter October 11, 1937 at thepost office at El Centro, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879.Title registered No. 358865 in U. S. Patent Office, and contents copyrighted 1939 bythe Desert Publishing Company. Permission to reproduce contents must be secured fromthe editor in writing. Subscription rate $2.50 per year in U. S. A. or possessions. Singlecopy 25 cents.RANDALL HENDERSON, EditorTAZEWELL H. LAMB, Associate EditorJ. WILSON McKENNEY, Business ManagerManuscripts and photographs submitted must be accompanied by full return postage.The Desert Magazine assumes no responsibility for damage or loss of manuscripts or photo-graphs although due care will be exercised for their safety. Subscribers should send noticeof change of address to the circulation department by the fifth of the month preceding issue.
JUNE,
1939
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