Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
15Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
193907 Desert Magazine 1939 July

193907 Desert Magazine 1939 July

Ratings:

4.5

(1)
|Views: 442|Likes:
Published by dm1937

More info:

Published by: dm1937 on Feb 21, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/05/2011

pdf

text

original

 
THE
M A G A ZN E
V
N,
i\
-
'•im
*.
 
0/
the
As
a
youngster just
old
enough
to
know what
it was all
about, WALTERWILHELM himself lived through
the
stirring events recited
in
this month'sstory, "Doras Diggin's."
The
coura-geous pioneer woman whose experiencesare described
in
this story
is
Walter'smother.Wiihelm
is not a
professional writer.He operates
a
garage
at
Yermo, Califor-nia,
and
spends
his
leisure time
out on
the Mojave desert hunting with
bow and
arrow
and
blowgun, collecting mineralspecimens
and
studying
the
strange
hab-
its
of the
denizens
of the
sand dunes.He
has
built
a
sturdy jallopy that willclimb
the
rocks like
a
burro—and
few
men
in the
southwest know
the
wildlifeof
the
desert country
as
well
as he.
If
any of the
readers
of the
DesertMagazine
are
curious
to
know
who pre-
pares
the
questions
and
answers
for the
"Desert Quiz" every month, here
is the
answer. Until this issue, they were
com-
STORES, OFFICES, ESTABLISHMENTS
INCREASE
YOUR PROFITS!
NEW FRIGIDAIREUNIT STORE CONDITIONER
Answers Need
of
Stores
and
Businessesfor Profit-Making
Air
Conditioning
• Here
is Air
Conditioningstripped
of all
complica-tion.
A
single, compact unitprovides cooling powerequal
to
6000
lbs. of ice
per
day.
Installed
in a
jiffy— Easily moved
to
otherlocalities. With controlledcooling
and
controlled
Air
Direction.
It's
thoroughlyproven — built
and
backedby General Motors
world's largest builder
of
mechanical cooling devices.New
Low
Cost.
Phonefor Free facts.
Stores
in
Imperial Valley, California
PRODUCT OF GENERAL MOTORS
piled
by the
office staff
of the DM in El
Centro. This month
we
have
a
guest"quizzer"
in the
person
of TOM WOR-
TH INGTON,
who has
been
a
desert
rat
so many years
he
always
has
sand
in his
hair.
Tom
belongs
to the
school thatlearned about
the
desert
by
sleeping
on
it—and hasn't much patience with "thoseblankety-blank tenderfeet
who
onlyknow what they read
in the
books."
Will members
of the
writing fraterni-ty please crowd over
and
make room
for
a
new
recruit—DESERT STEVE RAGS-DALE
of
Desert Center, California.Steve used
to
write atrocious poetry—and make
a
profit
out of
it—so
he
oughtto
do
very well
in the
field
of
prose.Explaining
his
venture into
the
field
of
journalism, Steve wrote:
"I
have
my
trailer home cached
in the
desert cliffssouth
of
Desert Center. Except when
it
is
too
cold
or
there
is
rain
or
wind,
I
cook,
eat,
sleep
and
write
out in the
open.
For the
first time
in my
life
I am
doing just
as I
please
-- and I
pleaseto live
and
think
and
write
in the
soli-tude, away from newspaper, radio,
and
jitterbug prattle, even from
the
gossipof
my
good wife."I
do not
anticipate seeing
the
majorportion
of my
writing published.
I sim-
ply can't
be
bothered.
But boy, oh boy!
I'm having
a
helluva
a
good time writingjust what
I
think
and
what
I
believe
to
be
the
truth, regardless
of
standardizedconcepts
or
orthodox conventions."LEO
A.
McCLATCHY,
who
wroteabout
his
boss, Frank Pinkley,
for the
Desert Magazine this month,
is
regionalpublicity manager
of the
national parkservice, with headquarters
in
Santa
Fe,
New Mexico.
He
received
his
early news-paper training
on the
Sacramento
Bee of
which
his
father,
the
late
V. S. Mc-
Clatchy,
was for
many years
the
publish-er.
He did a
"hitch"
in the
British trans-port service
in the
opening months
of the
World
War, in
India, Africa,
and
Egypt,and later served with
the
American
91st
Division
in
France
and
Belgium.After newspaper work
in
Oklahoma,Texas,
and
Tennessee, McClatchy wentto Washington
in 1921 as
correspondentof
the
Sacramento
Bee.
Later
he
estab-lished
an
independent news bureau
in
the national capital where
for ten
yearshe wrote national politics
and
regionalnews
for a
group
of
west coast news-papers.
He did
publicity work
for the
State
of
California during
the
Rolphadministration.
He has
been associatedwith
the
national park service,
in a sim-
ilar capacity, since January,
1926. He is
a Stanford graduate.McClatchy
is
married
and has
threechildren: Rene
and Leo, Jr., in
Santa
Fe
High school;
and
Lorette,
a
sophomorestudent
in the
University
of New
Mexico
 
DESERT
JULY
1 to 4—Frontier Day celebrationat Prescott, Arizona.1 to 5—Tenth annual Hopi crafts-man exhibit at Museum ofNorthern Arizona,
Flagstaff.
2 to 4—Annual rodeo at SilverCity, New Mexico.2 to 4—American Legion celebra-tion at Douglas, Arizona.2 to 4—Rodeo at Reno, Nevada.2 to 4—Annual Rodeo, includingRattlesnake derby, at Carls-bad, New Mexico.3 to 5—Annual Pow-Wow and all-Indian rodeo at
Flagstaff,
Ari-zona.4—Old-fashioned desert Fourth ofJuly program at Beatty, Ne-vada. Ert Moore, chairman.5 to 15—Utah Boys' State, spon-sored by American Legion, atCamp Williams near Lehi,Utah.6 to 8—Robbers Roost Rodeo atPrice, Utah.11 to 12—Fifty-third annual con-vention of Arizona WoolGrowers at
Flagstaff,
Arizona.13 to 15—Ute Stampede at Nephi,Utah.15 to 30 — Water colors, litho-graphs and etchings by Gor-don Grant on exhibit at Mu-seum of Northern Arizona,
Flagstaff.
21 to 24—Pioneer day program atOgden, Utah.21 to 25—Covered Wagon Daysat Salt Lake City, Utah.24 to 26—Horse racing program atBeaver City, Utah.
DESERT MAGAZINE TOHAVE NEW QUARTERS
J. Wilson McKenney, who has beenissociated with the Desert Magazine sinceits inception, has purchased the Advocate,i weekly newspaper at Legrand, Califor-nia. His equity in the Desert Magazine-has been acquired by Mrs. Bess Stacy and
Mrs.
Edna B. Clements, newspaperwomen of Calexico, California. Planshave been announced for moving themagazine and its printing plant to a newPueblo type building to be erected in ElCentre, California, within the next fourmonths. Damon Tedrick of New Con-cord, Ohio, recently has joined the staffof the Desert Magazine as advertisingmanager.
Volume 2JULY, 1939Number 9COVERCONTRIBUTORSCALENDARPOETRYEXPLORERINDIAN CRAFTSPUZZLEGEMSCAMERA ARTPIONEERPHOTOGRAPHYPERSONALITYWILD LIFEODDITYWEATHERPRIZESPLACE NAMESLEGENDFICTIONVAGABONDBOOKSLANDMARKNEWSCOMMENTMINING
DESERT TORTOISE, photograph byFred Hankins of Taft, CaliforniaWriters of the Desert Inside coverJuly events on the desert 1To a Cactus, and other poems 2Trapper in the Utah WildernessBy CHARLES KELLY 3In the Hogan of Sah-Nee, the WeaverBy MRS. WHITE MOUNTAIN SMITH ... 6Desert Quiz—A test of your knowledge ofthe Southwest 9Trees that Turned to StoneBy JOHN W. HILTON 10"Feel" of the DesertPhotograph by WM. M. PENNINGTON . .14Dora's Diggin'sBy WALT WILHELM 15Prize winning pictures in May 17'The Boss' at Casa Grande RuinsBy LEO A. McCLATCHY 19My Friend, the TortoiseBy DESERT STEVE RAGSDALE 21Mystery of Silver LakeBy WALTER FORD 23May temperatures on the desert 24Announcement of July photographic contest . . 25Origin of names in the Southwest 26A Journey to Skeleton HouseAs told to HARRY C. JAMES 27Hard Rock Shorty of Death ValleyBy LON GARRISON 281127 A. D. in ArizonaBy EVERETT RUESS 29Current reviews 30Prize contest for July 33Here and There on the Desert 34Just Between You and Me—by the Editor ... 36Briefs from the desert region 37
The Desert
Magazine
is
published
monthly by the Desert Publishing Company,
597
State Street, 101
Centro,
California, Kntered as second class matter
October 11,
1
!i:!7. at
the post office at El Centro, California, under the Act of March 3,
1879.
Title registered
No.
358865 in
V.
S. Patent Office, and contents copyrighted
1939 by
the Desert Publishing Company, Permission to reproduce contents must be securedfrom the
editor
in
writing.
Subscription rate $2.50 per year in U. S. A. or possessions.Single copy 2i> cents.
RANDALL HENDERSON,
EditorTAZEWKLL H. LAMB, Associate EditorDAMON S. TEDRICK, Advertising ManagerManuscripts and photographs submitted must be accompanied by full return post-
age.
The Desert Magazine assumes no responsibility for damage or loss of manuscriptsor photographs although due care will be exercised for their safety. Subscribers shouldsend notice of change of address to the circulation department by the fifth of themonth
preceding
issue.
JULY,
1939

Activity (15)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
Steve Peachey liked this
goldrocker liked this
findingthings liked this
1970lucy liked this
Ginny Richards liked this
troutman1 liked this
Dennis Legge liked this
raulnavejas liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->