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193911 Desert Magazine 1939 November

193911 Desert Magazine 1939 November

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THEM A G A ZN E
iJi&*k
:
i!f%*
NOVEMBER, 1939ANNIVERSARY NUMBER25 CENTS
 
n
Suit Lake City, UtahDear Mr. Henderson:Have just read with interest Mr. White'sstory of the "sandspikes" in today's Desert.My theory is that these peculiar formations arepetrified gopher holes. There are several rea-sons for this theory. They are always thesame shape and always found in colonies.The prehistoric gophers dug their holeswith a small burrow at the bottom. A flood,carrying silica and lime rilled in the holes.The whole formation was later turned to roc'-'.Thousands of years later the formation waseroded. The filling of the gopher holes provedto be harder than the surrounding rock, andthey weathered out, finally falling horizontalon the surface. They were then covered withwindblown sand.The stem is the former gopher hole, andthe ball at the bottom is the burrow. Petrifiedgopher holes are a scientific fact, verified bythe Smithsonian experts. They have beenfound in the badlands of South Dakota.CHARLES KELLY.
Reno,
NevadaDear Mr. Henderson:While on the desert collecting plants, I sawthis little tragedy, which I think bears telling.A 5-foot diamondback rattlesnake with hertwo young were gliding through the sagebrush.Her head turned from side to side, her tongueflashing in and out. She sensed danger, stop-ped and coiled with her rattles buzzing.A horde of brown crickets overtook thesnakes at that moment and immediately cov-ered the reptiles. The mother snake struck,landing three feet from her young. She coiledand struck again, but on her third attemptthe crickets weighted her down so she couldhardly lunge forward. She finally reached heryoung by lashing and fighting, but they werealready torn to pieces.Unable to rid herself of this strange enemyshe struck herself twice but without apparenteffect. Within 20 minutes the rattler and heryoung were stripped of all flesh. The brownhorde marched on. Crickets coming from be-hind stopped briefly at the skeletons of thesnakes and eventually even the rattles wereconsumed.TIM L. BREENE.
This unusual incident was witnessed a-long state highway
21
three miles fromBeowawe according to Mr. Breene. Thescourge of the crickets this summer wasso bad that motorists had to drive in lowgear to keep from skidding as hordes ojthe insects were crushed on the highway.
Roswell, New MexicoGentlemen:Enclosed is check for $5.50 for which pleasesend me the November 1938 and January1939 issues of your magazine, and also three
years'
subscription beginning with February,1940 when my present term expires.I need the numbers mentioned in order tocomplete my file. My first contact with yourmagazine was when I sneaked across the roadto Hilton's gem shop while my wife wasdrinking a date milk shake at Valerie Jean's.When the people in the gem shop sawmy precious glass I reluctantly gave one ofhow longingly I looked at all the mineralsthey had they knew I would like the magazineand persuaded me to buy it. I am glad I didfor it certainly hits the spot when I readthe articles on minerals. My main interest inyour magazine is in the articles which givethe location of the different mineral speci-
mens.
I also enjoy the features that deal withearly history of the Southwest and the biogra-phies of the men who did big things in thissection of the country.Here is wishing you continued success.W. FINCH WHITE, Jr.Los Angeles, CaliforniaDear Mr. Henderson:The Desert Magazine is usually so accuratethat a few lapses are the more noticeable.In the October issue, "True or False" quiz,question 16: "The Bisnaga or barrel cactusoften grows to a height of 12 feet or more,"is answered on page 32, "False, Bisnaga sel-dom grows higher than six feet."The Bisnaga indigenous to Santa Catalinaisland and other islands in the Gulf of Cali-fornia frequently attains a height of fourmeters (13 feet), a fact that your quiz edi-tor could not be blamed for missing if he isnot familiar with the Sonoran deserts in theirentirety.However, the fact is that this particular Bis-naga known as
Ferocactus diguettii,
does fre-quently exceed 12 feet in height.
Ferocactus pringlei
from Coahuila and Zac-atecas,
Ferocactus rostii
of the lower Imperialvalley (near San Felipe, B. C.) and
Ferocactusacanthodes
of the Colorado and Mojave des-
erts,
all known as Bisnaga frequently attain aheight of three meters, and
Ferocactus covilei,
a Bisnaga common in Arizona and Sonoraattains a height of over eight feet in thevicinity of Empalme, Sonora.All of which is in the interest of "a betterunderstanding of terophytic plants," the aimand object of the Cactus and Succulent Societyof America.W. TAYLOR MARSHALL, President.
Thanks, Mr. Marshall, for this infor-mation. We are always glad to be cor-rected by a man who knows his subjectas well as you know cactus.
— R. H.29 Palms, CaliforniaTo the Broken Glass Editor:The September number of the Desert Mag-azine would like to take the joy out of ourdesert lives with the breaking of our coloredglass illusions.Why deprive us of the thrill of exploita-tion of our desert as a creator of purple glass?We haven't a Carlsbad caverns under the earthto explore. Nor the Grand Canyon of Arizonato fly over. We cannot point a finger of prideat the armed Saguaros. But we can bask inthe purple glow of our colored glass collec-tion.When I came to the desert in 1936 seekinghealth I first landed in Palm Springs. Enter-ing a curio store or Indian trading post Iasked the courteous manager if the climatewas beneficial to asthmatics. He answered bypointing to a purple glass globe on an openporch. He said: "That was made purple bythe ultra-violet rays of the sun—and whywouldn't that cure all ills?"To make a short story out of this, I amnicely located in the desert at 29 Palms. InAugust my relatives from the frozen zone ofSan Francisco visited me. At the proper timeI took them to my pile of glass under a squawtea bush in my yard. After telling them aboutthem a little pitcher that had been in the sunfive months. Of course they were pleased.That day I received my September DesertMagazine, and passed it unopened to my des-ert-hungry relatives. Then all at once I heardthem laughing. "Read this," they said, "aboutcolored glass."My face was red and my voice was full offire when I told them what I thought aboutan editor who would be so brutally honest asto destroy all my pet illusions about purple
glass.
And am I peeved?
MRS.
H. A. WELLS.
HardRock Shorty
of ...DeathValley
By LON GARRISON
ii
/ SheEAH—I know," sourlyremarked Hard RockShorty. "I read a bookoncet an' it said that the puckerin'power o' these desert alum watersprings is generally vastly exagger-ated. Durn idiots—why I've sawthings the book writers'd absolute-ly claim was lies—but I saw 'em,an' I don't need no better proof 'nthat."Hard Rock moved his chair far-ther back into the shade and wenton with his discourse."I seen a guy oncet that hadsome o' this water dropped on hiscigar he d just lighted an' it pulledthe thing right down to where itburned his whiskers afore he c'ddrop it. I seen a clerk oncet thatwas wntin' an' he got some spilledon his pencil an' it not only shrunkup the pencil, it pulled the last fourwords right off the paper."But the best illerstration I everhad o' this shrinkin' power wasright over here to the bank. I wentin an' borrowed a hundred dollarsfor six months. Afore I c'd get outthe door, the president in puttin'the note down on his desk'd spilleda little bottle o' alum water he hadthere an' it run over the paper.When we got it mopped up, wefound out the durn note was threeweeks over due. Not only that, it'dreduced the interest rate so far thatwhen we figgered it all up thebanker owed me nineteen dollarsan' forty-three cents."
 
DESERT
OCT.
25
NOV.
1
New
Mexico
Edu-
cation association meeting
in Al-
buquerque.28 Annual Jamboree
of
Arizona SmallMine operators association
at
Tuc-
son.
C. M.
d'Autremont, generalchairman. Parade
of
mining
pro-
gress, exhibit hall
of
ores
and
pro-
cesses.31 Nevada's 75th birthday celebratedat Carson City. Sponsored
by Ad-
mission
Day
committee
and
direc-ted
by
Business
and
ProfessionalWoman's club.NOV.
1 All
Soul's
Day,
Dawn cere-mony, Taos Pueblo,
New
Mexico.1-4 National Sciot convention, Phoenix,Arizona.
C. P.
Niles, chairman.1-15 Arizona quail season;
bag
limit,10
per day or in
possession.1-25 Deer
and
turkey seasons
in
New
Mexico.2 Arizona Mineralogical society meetsat Arizona Museum,
Van
Buren
at
10th, Phoenix.4 University
of
Arizona's homecom-ing fotball game, Tucson.4 Arizona Pioneers' Historical socie-ty annual meeting, Tucson.8 Prehistoric Indian jewelry subjectof illustrated lecture
by
Clara
Lee
Tanner
of the
University
of Ari-
zona,
at
Arizona Museum, Phoenix.10-12 Annual Papago Indian fair
and
rodeo
at
Sells, Arizona. RichardHendricks, chairman.12 Fiesta
of San
Diego, Tesuque
and
Jemez Pueblos, New Mexico. (Har-vest Corn dance, Jemez; Buffalodance, Tesuque.)15
Dr.
Frank
C.
Lockwood lecturesat Arizona Museum
on
SylvesterMowry, pioneer Arizona miner.15 Arizona open season
on
mourningdoves closes.15-18 California Federation
of
Womens'clubs, southern district,
to
holdannual convention
in El
Centro,California.
Mrs. R. W.
Ware,convention chairman.15-DEC.
29
Hunting season
on
ducks,geese, Wilson's snipe
or
jack snipe,and coots
in
Arizona
and New
Mexico.16 Second October meeting
of Min-
eralogical society
at
Arizona
Mus-
eum, Phoenix.16 Close
of
30-day turkey, bear
and
deer seasons
in
Arizona.16-18 48th Annual convention,
Ari-
zona Education association, Phoe-nix.
J. J.
Clark, Phoenix, president.Open
to
Indian service teachers,Boy Scout leaders
and P-T. A.
members
for
first time.19
Rev.
Victor
R.
Stoner lectures
on
Coronado's Journey
at
ArizonaMuseum, Phoenix.24-26 State Hobby Fair, auspicesPhoenix Junior chamber
of com-
merce.
Dr.
A. G.
Horton, ASTC
at
Tempe, chairman.25-26
and
DEC.
2-3
Annual Horse racemeet
at
Las Vegas, Nevada. TommyThebo, chairman.
m
Volume
3
NOVEMBER 1939 Number
1
COVER
"NEWSPAPER ROCK"
in
Petrified Forest national
monument.
Photograph
by Dr.
Warren
F.
Fox,
El
Centro, California.
LETTERS
Comment from our readers Inside cover
FICTION
Hard Rock Shorty
of
Death Valley
By
LON GARRISON Inside cover
CALENDAR
Coming events
in
the
desert country
1
PHOTOGRAPHY
Prize winning pictures
in
September
2
EDITORIAL
There Are Two Deserts
3
HISTORY
Outpost
on
the
Colorado
By
ARTHUR WOODWARD
4
RECREATION
To the
Peak
of
White Mountain
By
ELIZABETH LEWIS
9
PERSONALITY
Samaritan
of
Cave Springs
By
WALTER FORD
12
PUZZLE
Desert Quiz—a test
of
your desert knowledge
. .15
INDIAN LORE
When
the
Hopi Deserted Their Ancient GodsBy MRS. WHITE MOUNTAIN SMITH
... 16
POETRY
"In
a
Garden,"
and
other poems
20
WILD
LIFE
Gnomes
of
the
Desert NightBy GRACE
P.
NICKERSON
19
CAMERA ART
'Feel'
of
the
DesertPhotograph
by
WM.
M.
PENNINGTON
... 21
ADVENTURE
Trail
of a
Renegade Pahute
By
GEORGE
E.
PERKINS
22
GEMS
Mine That Has Everything—Except Gem Stones
By
JOHN
W.
HILTON
26
VAGABOND
I
Have
not
Tired
of
the
Wilderness
By
EVERETT RUESS
29
INDUSTRY
Harvest Camp
in
the
Navajo ForestBy RICHARD
VAN
VALKENBURGH
... 30
LANDMARK
Rhyolite—By MYRTLE
P.
MILES
34
CONTEST
Announcement
of
monthly landmark contest
. . 35
WEATHER
September temperatures
on
the
desert
. . . .35
BOOKS
Current reviews
of
Southwestern literature
...
36
MINING
Briefs from
the
desert region
37
NEWS
Here
and
There
on
the
Desert
38
HOBBY
Gems
and
Minerals
40
PLACE
NAMES
Origin
of
names
in
the
Southwest
42
CONTRIBUTORS
Writers
of
the
Desert
43
PRIZES
Announcement
of
monthly photographic contest
. 43
COMMENT
Just Between You and Meby the Editor
...
44
The Desert Magazine is published monthly by the Desert Publishing Company, 597State Street, El Centro, California. Entered as second class matter October 11, 1937, atthe post office at El Centro, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Title registered
No.
358865 in U. S. Patent Office, and contents copyrighted 1939 by the Desert PublishingCompany. Permission to reproduce contents must be secured from the editor in writing.RANDALL HENDERSON, Editor.TAZEWELL H. LAMB, Associate Editor.Manuscripts and photographs submitted must be accompanied by full return post-
age.
The Desert Magazine assumes no responsibility for damage or loss of manuscriptsor photographs although due care will be exercised for their safety. Subscribers shouldsend notice of change
of
address to the circulation department by the fifth of the monthpreceding issue.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
1
year $2.50
— 2
years $4.00
— 3
years $5.00GIFT SUBSCRIPTIONS:
1
subscription $2.50
— two
$4.00
three $5.00Canadian subscriptions
25c
extra, foreign
50c
extraAddress subscription letters
to
Desert Magazine,
El
Centro, California
NOVEMBER,
1939
1

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great mag and for any desert mag fan we have the archives on disc and a lot easier to read mydesertmagazine DOT com
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