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194009 Desert Magazine 1940 September

194009 Desert Magazine 1940 September

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Published by: dm1937 on Feb 21, 2008
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09/06/2012

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THE
MAGAZINE
SEPTEMBER, 194025 CENTS
 
oj tke 3>eiebt
This month's feature story about theApache
chief,
Cochise, was actually writ-ten in the heart of Dragoon mountainsin Arizona where the Indian fighter hadhis rendezvous during much of the 10years he was on the warpath against thewhite men.SHERMAN BAKER, the writer of thehistorical sketch, lives with Mrs. Bakerat an abandoned ranger station. Whenthey go to town (Tucson is 85 milesaway) they travel over 40 miles of roughmountain road before they reach thepaved highway."We have no telephone," writes Sher-man, "and our nearest neighbor is threemiles away. Leading a simple life faraway from a world gone mad, we con-sider ourselves the luckiest and happiestpeople alive."Baker was born in Norfolk, Virginia,and is a graduate of the University ofArizona. At various times he has residedin West Indies, France and England, andhas served as seaman, prospector andgovernment clerk. At present he is de-voting all his time to research and writ-ing on Southwestern subjects.JOHN HILTON loaded his bedroll inhis old desert car in August and took thesandy road that leads up Salt creek washand into the Orocopia mountains. Johnbelieves there is more gem material inthat area than has been reported—and ifthe trip is successful he will be tellingthe readers of the Desert Magazine aboutit later. Many hundreds of collectors havevisited the Orocopia bloodstone fieldwhich Hilton reported in this magazinein March, 1938, and some very fine speci-mens have been brought out.MARY BEAL, who writes the botani-cal features for the Desert Magazine, isspending August in Riverside where shewas a member of the public library staffbefore she moved to the Judge Van Dykeranch at Daggett in 1910. Miss Beal willwrite about the desert sage family for theOctober number.GEORGE E. PERKINS of Overton,Nevada, who has supplied much authen-tic historical data for the Desert Maga-zine
staff,
including the story of the rene-gade Pahute Indian, Mouse, has filed asa candidate for the Nevada state assemblysubject to the will of the voters in No-vember.ARTHUR and LOUISE EATON whowrite and edit the gem and mineral de-partment for the Desert Magazine, arespending the summer in the Northwest.It is partly a vacation trip and partly afield trip in behalf of their editorial work.ARTHUR WOODWARD, curator ofhistory in the Los Angeles Museum, whois a frequent contributor to the DesertMagazine, spent the past month in Mexi-co doing field and library research workin archaeology and history.
o
In judging the merit of feature articlessubmitted to the Desert Magazine, thestaff regards good photography as no lessimportant than readable text matter. Pic-tures should be 5x7 or larger, glossyprints, and must have sharp focus, strongcontrast, clear detail and good composi-tion. It is useless to try to sell a featureto this market when pictures are medi-ocre, or worse. Less than 10 percent of themanuscripts received at the office are ac-companied by acceptable photography.This magazine pays one cent a wordfor feature material accepted, and from$1.00 to $3.00 each for photographs. Anaverage of 150 manuscripts are receivedand read by the staff each month—andabout five out of every 150 are accepted.This does not include the hundreds ofpoems that come in every month.
When you buy VENETIAN BLINDS
demand
REG.
U.S.PAT.OFF.
FLEXIBLE
STEEL
SLATS
For your protection lookfor this mark of quality.
Beware of inferior imita-tions.
LIFE-ERIZE—Rust Inhib-iting Base Coat.BAKED ENAMEL—PrimeCoat.BAKED ENAMEL—FinishCoat.STA-WAX — Coating toPreserve Lustre.For economical and longlasting service
demand
LIFETIME steel slat Ve-netian Blinds. They costno more—available in 12pastel shades—used by thebetter Venetian blind man-ufacturers.
PRODUCTS CORP.
Los Angeles, California
 
DESERT
AUG.
31
Dig-N-Dogie Days, annualrodeo
and
western celebration
at
Kingman, Arizona.
(3
days)31 Annual Fiesta. Santa
Fe, New
Mexico. Inaugurated
by
GovernorPenuela
in 1712. (3
days)
•I
Deming Downs race meet,
Dem-
ing,
New
Mexico.
(3
days)31 Sierra Club
of
Southern Californiatakes boat trip
on
Lake Mead
and
lower gorge
of
Colorado river.Reservations:
Mr. and Mrs. Rus-
sell Hubbard,
2071
Balmer
Dr.,
Los Angeles, California.
(3
days)31 Coronado Entrada pageant
to be
presented
in
Clifton, Arizona.(3 days)SEPT.
I
Southwest Museum,
Los An-
geles, California, opens with
ex-
hibit
of
Indian drawings
by
Eben
F.
Comins. Open daily, free,
ex-
cept Monday.
1-2
Senior Rodeo,
El
Paso, Texas.2
St.
Stephen's
Day,
Acoma,
New
Mexico. Leave Highway
66 at
Paraje,
5
3 miles west
of
Albu-querque; drive
15
miles
to
Acoma.2-3 Duchesne county Stampede,
Du-
chesne, Utah.6-7 Peach
Day at
Brigham City, Utah.Reenactment
of
discovery
of
Grand Canyon
at
DiscoveryPoint, South
Rim.
Five-scene
pag-
eant. This special Coronado
Cen-
tennial feature originally scheduledfor August.1(1-12 Cache county rodeo, Logan, Utah.11-12 Galena Days celebration, Bing-ham, Utah. Dale Johnston, chair-man.12-14 Annual rodeo, Vernal, Utah,
Al-
vin
E.
Weeks, president.12-15 Nevada livestock show
and
Elkocounty fair, Elko. Donald Drown,secretary.15-16 Mexican Independence
Day
cele-bration, Phoenix, Arizona.20-22 Navajo Tribal Fair
at
WindowRock, Arizona, featuring
a pag-
eant
of
eight episodes during
the
American
era.
Earl
L.
Raines, FortWingate, director;
Tom
Dodge,announcer.22-29
New
Mexico state fair, Albuquer-que.24-25 Archdiocesan Council
of
NationalCouncil
of
Catholic Women, Clov-
is,
New
Mexico.25-28 Bi-State Fair, Clovis.27-28
New
Mexico State federation
of
labor convention, Clovis.27-29 Antelope Valley Fair, Lancaster,California.
DattiL
Volume 3SEPTEMBER, 1940
Number
11
COVERCONTRIBUTORSCALENDARPOETRYINDIANSPERSONALITYHUMORGEMSTREASUREQUIZWEATHERDIARYPHOTOGRAPHYTRAVELOGPERSONALITYHOBBYMININGPLACE NAMESNEWSBOTANYARTIFACTSBOOKSHOBBYLANDMARKSCOMMENTLETTERS
SUNSET, photograph by Eldon L. Eby,Santa Ana, California.Writers of the Desert . inside coverSeptember events on the desert 1DESERT MYSTERY, and other poems .... 2'Cochise no Take Cattle!' By SHERMAN BAKER . 3Barstow's Big Sister—By CORA L. KEAGLE . . 7Hard Rock Shorty—By LON GARRISON ... 8Miles and Miles of ChalcedonyBy LOUISE EATON 9Lost Breyfogle Mine—By JOHN D. MITCHELL . 13A Test of Your Desert Knowledge 14July Temperatures on the Desert 14August at Yaquitepec—By MARSHAL SOUTH . 15Prize winning pictures in July 17Flame-Colored Park in NevadaBy HULBERT BURROUGHS 18New Director of National Parks 21Cacti—Edited by LUCILE HARRIS 23Briefs from the desert region 24Origin of names in the Southwest 25Here and There on the Desert 26From Cabbages to Candles—By MARY BEAL . 28Metate and Mortero 29GUNS OF THE FRONTIER, and other reviews . . 30Gems and Minerals—Edited byARTHUR L. EATON 31Zabriskie Point—By DOROTHY CLORA CRAGEN 34Just Between You and Me—By the Editor ... 36Comment from Desert Magazine readers ... 37
The Desert Magazine
is
published monthly
by the
Desert Publishing Company,
636
State Street,
El
Centro, California. Entered
as
second class matter October
11, 1937, at
the post office
at El
Centro, California, under
the Act of
March
3, 1879.
Title registeredNo. 358865
in U. S.
Patent Office,
and
contents copyrighted
1940 by the
Desert PublishingCompany. Permission
to
reproduce contents must
be
secured from
the
editor
in
writing.RANDALL HENDERSON, Editor.TAZEWELL
H.
LAMB
and
LUCILE HARRIS, Associate Editors.Eugene
A.
LaMont, Advertising representative416 Wall Street,
Los
Angeles, California. Phone
TR 1501
Manuscripts
and
photographs submitted must
be
accompanied
by
full return post-age.
The
Desert Magazine assumes
no
responsibility
for
damage
or
loss
of
manuscriptsor photographs although
due
care will
be
exercised
for
their safety. Subscribers shouldsend notice
of
change
of
address
to the
circulation department
by the
fifth
of the
monthpreceding issue.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
1
year $2.50
— 2
years $4.00
— 3
years $5.00GIFT SUBSCRIPTIONS:
1
subscription $2.50
— two
$4.00
three $5.00Canadian subscriptions
25c
extra, foreign
50c
extraAddress subscription letters
to
Desert Magazine,
El
Centro, California
SEPTEMBER,
1940

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