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The Daily Tar Heel for Feb. 27, 2014

The Daily Tar Heel for Feb. 27, 2014

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The print edition for Feb. 27, 2014
The print edition for Feb. 27, 2014

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By Jonathan Moyer
Staff Writer
The Federal Transit  Administration approved a request by Triangle Transit on Tuesday to begin development on a passenger train system known as the Durham-Orange Light Rail Transit Project. Brad Schulz, a spokesman for Triangle Transit, said the approval was the first step of many toward the completion of the rail system. Phase one of the project is known as project development, in which engi-neering and environmental  work will take place.Schulz said the objective of this two-year period is to define the 17-mile route the train  will take, as well as determine  where stations will be. The product of this phase will be a Final Environmental Impact Statement and a Record of Decision that will solidify the findings of the development phase, Schulz said in an email.Earl McKee, vice chair of the Orange County Board of Commissioners and a critic of the light rail, said this is only the beginning of development and not an approval to begin
By Kelsey Weekman
Staff Writer
To real estate agent Larry Tollen, getting a per-mit for a home renovation in Chapel Hill is always a new experience. And Tollen is a veteran home renovator.“Every time I have to get something permitted, I get the impression that no one has ever done a renovation before,” he said. “It’s like the process is  being designed for you from scratch every time.Tollen is not the only local realtor concerned  with the permitting process.Desiree Goldman, a member of the Greater Chapel Hill Association of Realtors, said the asso-ciation discussed the slow and expensive process at a recent meeting.Chapel Hill is low on residential land develop-ment — with only 2 percent of its available resi-dential land still sitting empty — and the average age of homes in the area is rising. Goldman said people generally have to renovate older homes  before putting them on the market.For those renovations in a residential area that include additions, alterations, kitchen remodel-ings and structural work such as pool additions and roof replacements, the town requires a permit from the planning department.Cosmetic work that costs less than $5,000 does not require a permit.The permitting application includes a project description, zoning and area information and mechanical and construction details.Permit fees are based on the price of the renova-tion and can range from $55 to more than $2,500.Miscellaneous fees are added for certain features
Serving UNC students and the University community since 1893
Winning takes talent, to repeat takes character.
 JOHN WOODEN
Thursday, February 27, 2014
dailytarheel.com
Volume 122, Issue 4
DTH/CHRIS CONWAY
UNC sophomore guard Marcus Paige scored 10 points in overtime during UNC’s 85-84 win Wednesday.
Permit process stumps residents
MAGIC MARCUS
Paige scores 35 points in overtime stunner in Raleigh
Chapel Hill requires permits for a host of home renovations.
By Brooke Pryor
Senior Writer
RALEIGH — In a game where 10 men  battle on the court for 40 minutes, in the end it came down to two men in one extra five minute period.Marcus Paige vs. T.J. Warren.No. 19 North Carolina’s leading scorer — a notorious second-half phenomenon — against the ACC’s leading scorer backed by a home crowd clamoring for him to carry his team over an in-state rival.But with 0.7 seconds left on the overtime clock in front of a hostile crowd, it was Paige who drew final blood, using a Brice Johnson screen to maneuver around Jordan  Vandenberg and drive toward the basket. As his left hand extended to the rim, rolling the ball off his fingertips and into the net, Paige took a pin to the tautly inflat-ed balloon of PNC Arena.North Carolina 85, N.C. State 84.It was over.Just as quickly as the crowd became unglued with an early six-point lead in the  bonus period, the revelry ceased, rapidly quieting to funereal tones.Smatterings of expletives were shouted to referees, to players of both teams, to no one in particular.
Holder: State attorneys should question laws
By Eric Garcia
Senior Writer
U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder told a group of state attorneys general Tuesday that they are not obligated to defend state same-sex marriage bans, which could have far-reaching implications. At a meeting of the National  Association of Attorneys General, Holder encouraged leading attorneys to follow the Obama administration’s example not to defend the federal Defense of Marriage  Act, which was struck down in the U.S. Supreme Court last summer.“In general, I believe we must be suspi-cious of legal classifications based solely on sexual orientation,” Holder said in his speech. “Our ideals are continually advanced as our justice systems — and our union — are strengthened.”Holder pointed to state attorneys gen-eral in Pennsylvania, Nevada, Virginia and Oregon who declined to defend their state’s gay marriage bans in court, but said refus-ing to defend state laws should be rare and not based on political differences.In May 2012, North Carolina passed a constitutional gay marriage ban, which N.C. Attorney General Roy Cooper, a Democrat, has said he will defend despite personal opposition.Rob Schofield, policy director at the left-leaning N.C. Policy Watch, said Holder’s stance is “another chip” in the same-sex marriage law.He said attorneys general squander state resources when they defend laws they believe to be unconstitutional.
The attorney general cited his non-defense of DOMA.
Eric Holder
is the U.S. attorney general. He gave a speech on Tuesday at a meeting of the National Association of Attorneys General and spoke about the ability of state attorney gen-erals to not defend laws they find unconstitutional.
SEE
MARCUS PAIGE,
PAGE 7SEE
RENOVATIONS,
PAGE 7
MEN’S BASKETBALL: NORTH CAROLINA 85, N.C. STATE 84, OT
But Tyler Younts, a legal policy ana-lyst at the conservative John Locke Foundation, said Holder’s statements could set a harmful legal precedent.“State attorneys general are basically the lawyer for the state, and to take posi-tions against your client seems to be a conflict of interest,” Younts said. Younts said Holder’s sentiments could also affect North Carolina’s voter identifi-cation law, which Cooper has criticized.Mike Meno, spokesman for the state  branch of the American Civil Liberties Union, said state laws facing constitu-tional challenges will still be defended in court, even if an attorney general refuses.“If you look at other states, even in the cases where attorneys general decline to defend, someone still steps up to defend that law,” Meno said.Last year, the N.C. General Assembly passed a law that would allow the state legislative leaders to challenge a state law or constitutional amendment in judicial proceedings.Meno said the N.C. ACLU has filed lawsuits over the state’s same-sex mar-riage ban, restrictions on abortion and the voter ID law.“We’re confident in securing rights for same-sex couples regardless of who’s defending,” he said.
state@dailytarheel.com
Triangle Transit gets approval for light rail
The 17-mile passenger train route will link Chapel Hill to Durham.
 751557515485404050115
Durham-Orange light rail location
DTH/HEATHER CAUDILLSOURCE: TRIANGLE TRANSIT DOCUMENTSUNC Hospitals StationDurham StationN.C. CentralUniversity StationFriday Center Drive Station
construction.He said the project develop-ment phase would let the coun-ty gain a better understanding of the project and show whether a light rail system would be a  worthwhile investment.“It will give advocates, as well as critics, a chance to evaluate the studies,” McKee said.McKee said his main concern about the project is its inability to serve transit-dependent resi-dents. He said the bus system is a much better method of public transit for students and others that rely on it for transporta-tion.McKee said improvements to the bus system should be
SEE
LIGHT RAIL,
PAGE 7
 
TODAY
Spring Job and Internship Expo:
Meet with more than 100 local and national employ-ers that are hiring for full-time positions and internships. Bring multiple copies of your resume. Before meeting with employ-ers, check out the “Tunnel of Impression,” where you can get a professional picture taken for your LinkedIn profile. Business attire recommended. To view participating employers, visit http://bit.ly/2014SpringExpo.
Time:
 Noon - 4 p.m.
Location:
 Ram’s Head Recre-ation Center
Love Alone (Play):
After a routine medical procedure goes horribly wrong, tragedy will con-nect and transform the lives of both the patient’s family and the doctor. Both must navigate the difficult areas of loss, anger and humor in order to reach healing.  Tickets range from $15 to $55.  The show will run every day until March 15.
Time:
 7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.
Location:
 Paul Green Theatre
FRIDAY
Art a la Carte (Class):
Unwind for the weekend by taking part in a hands-on art class designed
NOTED.
Good news, America. A recent report finds the obesity rate for kids aged 2 to 5 has plummeted by more than 40 percent. The percentage of adults who are obese remains stable at 34.9 percent. Good to know parents are giving their young chil-dren nutritious food at least?
QUOTED.
“MARRIAGE = ONE MAN & ONE MAN. Enough of these activist judg-es. FAVORITE IF YOU AGREE.”— Dan Patrick, a Texas state senator  who is opposed to gay marriage, but made  just a little typo regarding his stance on Twitter. He then felt the need to clarify his real viewpoint — five times. Gee, thanks.
 W 
ho needs stuffy critiques of five-star restaurants when  you could just read the over-the-top Grand Forks Herald critique of Ruby Tuesday? South Dakota’s most reputable food critic, Marilyn Hagerty, wrote the Ruby Tuesday on 32nd Street is “one of the stars” of the Grand Forks restaurant scene. Hagerty is best known for her raving review of the city’s Olive Garden,  which went viral in 2012. As for Ruby Tuesday, Hagerty can’t get enough of the wide array of pickled beets and edamame on the salad bar.“It is one of more than 800 similar restaurants worldwide and is known for its Garden Bar. The name was taken from (the) Rolling Stones song, ‘Ruby Tuesday,’” she wrote in a Pulitzer-worthy ending.
Ruby Tuesday gets rave review
From staff and wire reports
DAILY DOSE
 Someone reported sus-picious activity at 124 W. Rosemary St. at 3:04 a.m. Tuesday, according to Chapel Hill police reports.The homeowner heard a suspicious noise inside the residence, reports state.
 Someone reported a sus-picious incident at 1105 N.C. Highway 54 at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, according to Chapel Hill police reports.Four people identified themselves as police entered and searched a residence, reports state.
 Someone reported tres-passing at 159 E. Franklin St. at 10:14 p.m. Tuesday, accord-ing to Chapel Hill police reports.Someone found people sleeping on top of the build-ing, reports state.
 Someone reported dam-age to personal property at 205 Sage Road at 4:29 p.m. Monday, according to Chapel Hill police reports. A car door made contact  with another person’s vehicle, causing damage estimated at $100, reports state.
 Someone reported a park-ing dispute at 431 W. Franklin St. at 4:45 p.m. Monday, according to Chapel Hill police reports.Threats were made during the parking dispute, reports state.
 Someone lost a ring from his or her pants pocket at 2505 Homestead Road at 4 p.m. Monday, according to Chapel Hill police reports.The ring was later found, reports state.• Someone reported a civil disturbance at 141 E. Rosemary St. at 5:50 p.m. Tuesday, according to Chapel Hill police reports.
To make a calendar submission, email calendar@dailytarheel.com. Please include the date of the event in the subject line, and attach a photo if you wish. Events will be published in the newspaper on either the day or the day before they take place.
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
 just for UNC students. This week, participants will study how to draw from a gridded image and get to try your own hand at doing so. Bring an image such as a photo that you would like to translate into a drawing. $10 per class. All materials provided.
Time:
 4 p.m. - 7 p.m.
Location:
 Ackland Art Museum
POLICE LOG
 
News
Thursday, February 27, 2014
The Daily Tar Heel
2
 WONDROUS WAFFLES
P
eggy Ding, a research collaborator visit-ing the School of Education, eats waffles at  Alpha Delta Pi’s Waffle Night Wednesday. “I have never tried waffles before,” Ding said. “I saw the advertisement in Davis Library and decided to come.”
DTH/KEARNEY FERGUSON
Due to a reporting error, Monday’s front page story, “Powell petitions town occupancy rule” incor-rectly identified the creater of the petition against the Chapel Hill occupancy law. Current Student Body President Christy Lambden created the petition and Student Body President-elect Andrew Powell joined it following his election earlier this month. The Daily Tar Heel apologizes for the error.
• The Daily Tar Heel reports any inaccurate information published as soon as the error is discovered.• Editorial corrections will be printed below. Errors committed on the Opinion Page have corrections printed
on that page. Corrections also are noted in the online versions of our stories.
• Contact Managing Editor Cammie Bellamy at managing.editor@dailytarheel.com with issues about this policy.
CORRECTIONS
 Like us at facebook.com/dailytarheelFollow us on Twitter @dailytarheel 
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 Established 1893
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TIPS
Mail and Office: 151 E. Rosemary St.
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carolinaperformingarts.org
 
BOX OFFICE 919.843.3333
STUDENT TICKETS JUST
 
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AT THE VILLAS
 
By Wei Zhou
Staff Writer
 With more than 3,300 members involved in Greek life, UNC fraternities and sororities offer more than just temporary social connections — they provide a large alumni network for students after college.Many current Greek students create unique networks at UNC in terms of mentorship, career development advice and internship opportunities.“It’s a way to separate yourself from the other applicants and particularly make connections  with CEOs,” said Hilliard Burton, president of Chi Psi Fraternity.Founded in 1855, Chi Psi’s UNC chapter is one of the largest on campus and offers many differ-ent networking opportunities such as dinners  with former members and guest speaker lectures.Burton said as a brother, he has access to alumni for career or internship suggestions.“There are opportunities for those students in the chapter to interact in a very direct way with alumni,” said Aaron Bachenheimer, director of the office of fraternity and sorority life and com-munity involvement.He said Greek alumni are willing to give their time, wisdom and advice to the students.“Many of those alumni stay involved, stay con-nected, come back to campus, so the students have opportunities to meet with and network with those folks multiple times a year and set up opportuni-ties for internships or job connections,” he said.He said in general, the older the group, the more extensive the alumni networking is.But he added some younger groups also have  very strong alumni networks.Chartered in 1976, Alpha Phi Alpha is consid-ered one of the newer fraternities on campus and has about 200 alumni across the country. Warren Wyatt, the president of Alpha Phi Alpha, said members of the organization regard the alumni connections as valuable to their careers.“When you are looking for a job, you know, you need some type of reference, some kind of credi- bility, and alumni will help you with that,” he said.Bachenheimer said Greek alumni tend to be the most engaged and generous donors.He said a lot of Greek alumni stay connected through different ways after graduation. Some Greek organizations have chapters across the country and alumni are still in touch even 20 or more years after graduation.“There is a sense of commitment and loyalty that gets engendered through Greek experience that does not typically happen with most other student organizations,” he said.Bachenheimer said Greek students have an added sense of permanence at the University.“It’s a place when they come back for a foot- ball game on a Saturday 10 years from now, they may not know anybody on campus, but they know in their frat, they are gonna have a con-nection.”
university@dailytarheel.com
News
Thursday, February 27, 2014
The Daily Tar Heel
3
REDEFINING ROMEO
DTH/SYDNEY HANES
Abigail Coryell (front) and Mary Stewart Evans rehearse for Kenan Theatre Company’s production of “R+J,” on Wednesday.
Greeks soak up alumni connections
Kenan Theatre Company puts a spin on the classic
By Megan Caron
Staff Writer
Shakespeare’s classic love story has tran-scended time periods and settings — now two student directors are playing with the show’s gender roles.Kenan Theatre Company’s “R+J,” a mod-ern interpretation of “Romeo and Juliet,” opens tonight.“R+J,” written by Joe Calarco, follows a group of Catholic school students as they  begin to read “Romeo and Juliet” for the first time, breaking school rules.The script was originally written for a male cast, but co-directors graduate stu-dent Nathaniel Claridad and junior Katie Chelena thought two casts — one male and one female — would bring a unique dynamic to a familiar story. A single-gender, four-person cast means that each actor is responsible for more than one character in the show.“There are no costume changes, so it’s all up to the actor to drive the show,” Claridad said.The show will also be done in-the-round,  with the audience surrounding the stage, creating a more intimate atmosphere  between the audience and the actors.Chelena said audience members will hear Shakespeare’s words in a new and exciting way.“It’s fresh,” she said. “It takes something that’s very old and stale and makes it fiery and brings it back to life.”In addition to the proximity of the audi-ence and the small casts, the show will also only have one prop: a giant piece of red fabric.“That’s my favorite kind of work,” Chelena said. “When you strip down your resources to only the bare basics, suddenly the most simple thing becomes so beautiful and I think that’s the most exciting thing for me.”Junior Abigail Coryell, one of the show’s actresses, said the challenges of the minimal-ist play made it extremely fun to work on.“It’s been really rewarding to try and understand how Juliet and the student in the story can become the same story,” she said.Coryell also said she thinks students in the audience will be able to relate to the students in the show.“The fact that we are students at the same time — that they are just sneaking off and doing something they are not supposed to be doing and they start believing in this story — it just brings the beauty and the poetry and the danger of Romeo and Juliet closer to home,” she said.Claridad said having two separate casts has helped show the variation in gender dynamics more clearly, but each cast also
Fraternity and sorority networks often yield career opportunities.
Google Fiber may reach Chapel Hill
Carolina Creates does Beatles
By Kris Brown
Staff Writer
Google Fiber, a high-speed televi-sion and Internet service, could soon  be coming to Chapel Hill.Chapel Hill and Carrboro, along  with Raleigh, Durham, Morrisville, Cary and Garner, are some of the 34 cities included in Google Fiber’s poten-tial expansion announced last week.Google Fiber is currently only available in three cities across the country: Kansas City, Mo., Austin, Texas and Provo, Utah.“It’s an exciting prospect for our region and would be a catalyst for economic development and entrepre-neurs,” said Chapel Hill Town Council member Lee Storrow in an email. Google Fiber’s connection speeds are 100 times faster than conventional  broadband services, are capable of pro- viding clear high-definition TV, and can allow for near instant downloads.The cities are not approved yet, and Google said it will be working  with mayors and city officials in the next few months to check if the cities have ample infrastructure and the necessary resources to submit a high  volume of construction permits.The cities must submit their quali-fications by May 1, and then Google plans to announce the final list of cit-ies that will get Google Fiber by the end of the year. Marc Hoit, vice chancellor for information technology at N.C. State University, said he is excited about the possibility of Google Fiber in the Research Triangle Park area. He said Google could have been
The service is currently available in three cities but has plans to expand.
By Zhai Yun Tan
Staff Writer
 When The Beatles first set foot in the United States, they topped the charts and attracted millions of fans. Fifty years later, “Beatlemania” is still alive and will storm Chapel Hill tonight.Hosted by Carolina Creates, “All You Need is Love” will com-memorate the 50th anniversary of The Beatles’ arrival in the U.S.. Student bands will come together at Chapel Hill Underground on Rosemary Street to celebrate by playing Beatles hits along with their own compositions.“The idea started in the team  because a lot of people were fans of The Beatles,” said senior Patrick Carney, co-director of Carolina Creates’ music division. “I think most musicians appreciate the influence of the band on music culture.”In addition to paying tribute to The Beatles, Carney also seeks to use this event to promote student musicians — the goal of Carolina Creates Music.The featured performers include Carolina Sidekicks, Sloth, Moneybox and sophomore singer-songwriter Aline Martins. Carney is part of the group Carolina Sidekicks.“We were all sort of the side-kicks in our other projects,” he said. “We thought it’d be fun to get together and form a group that  would just go out and play covers of songs we all really like, taking turns fronting the band so we’re not sidekicks all the time.”The band will be playing Beatles songs already in their repertoire, while Martins will be
Musicians celebrate 50 years since the famous group’s U.S. arrival.
COURTESY OF PATRICK CARNEY
Sophomore Aline Martins will perform a jazz rendition of The Beatles’ “All My Loving” in the Carolina Creates’ event, “All You Need is Love.”
performing their songs with her own twist.“I’m going to do ‘All My Loving’ — it’s going to be a pretty jazzy rendition of it, my take on Amy  Winehouse’s version,” Martins said. “It’s like a cover of a cover.”Martins often performs for dif-ferent organizations on campus  but said as a devoted Beatles fan, she’s excited for “All You Need is Love.”“I immediately started thinking about a set list after they contact-ed me,” she said.Carolina Creates also held a promotional contest on the Facebook event page encourag-ing people to post their favorite Beatles songs. A poster will be chosen randomly to receive two free tickets.Senior Shezeen Ali, Carolina Creates Music’s director of mar-keting, said the response to the event has been very positive.“I knew there would be fans,
COME TOGETHER
Time:
9:30 p.m.
Location:
Chapel Hill Underground
Info:
on.fb.me/1fsqOTz
 but I’ve been even more sur-prised by how many people are enthusiastic,” she said. “Their favorite music wouldn’t neces-sarily be rock, but they love The Beatles.”Senior Ian Porter, event coordi-nation chairman and host of the event, is also an avid Beatles fan.“That’s what’s exciting about them — throughout the years they evolved as they grew older. You’ll see very different phases of The Beatles throughout the night,” he said.“You can’t go wrong with any songs with them. You never can.”
arts@dailytarheel.com
SEE THE SHOWS
Time:
Feb. 27, March 1-2 (male cast), Feb. 28, March 2-3 (female). Show times vary.
Location:
Kenan Theatre
Info:
on.fb.me/1kk6kv6
helps make Shakespeare more acceptable.“People are usually very frightened of Shakespeare or think he is boring, but he’s not,” he said. “He actually taps right into  who we are as human beings.Junior and actor William Foote said audiences should look forward to being intrigued by the show.“It encapsulates the comedy aspect of it hugely, but at the same time, it is really a tragedy as well, so it is a really good bal-ance,” he said.Coryell said this performance of Romeo and Juliet is for those who may not fre-quent the theater often.“This would be the production for them to see, because it’s (students) up on stage,” she said.“It’s four students playing around and getting burned by the fire that they are playing with.”
arts@dailytarheel.com
“It’s an exciting prospect for our region and would be a catalyst for economic development and entrepreneurs.” 
Lee Storrow,
Chapel Hill Town Council member
drawn to the area because of the N.C. Next Generation Network, which is a collaboration of universities and municipalities, including UNC and Chapel Hill, that aims to supply ultra-fast bandwidth at affordable prices. “Because of the three universities (in the area), because of the high-tech area and Triangle Park, because of the stu-dents and the start-ups that we do, we  believe that an innovation region like this would make the fastest and best use of high-speed Fiber,” Hoit said.Hoit said the technology has far-reaching applications — two years ago, a violist, a violinist and cellist performed together 600 miles away from each other in real time using a Fiber connection.Neil Davis, a freshman study-ing computer science at UNC, said Google Fiber could expand the oppor-tunities for collaboration between UNC students. “Possibly, it could give computer sci-ence students a better infrastructure to  work on open-source projects,” he said. “This being Google, they may allow us to tamper around with Fiber itself.”Davis said the availability of high-tech resources in the area could spur students to be more proactive in the  work they produce.“It’s inspiring enough for me to  want to do computer science, not just to innovate, but also to innovate to improve our society.”
state@dailytarheel.com

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