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194010 Desert Magazine 1940 October

194010 Desert Magazine 1940 October

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THEMAGAZINE
OCTOBER, 194025 CENTS
 
LEON V. ALMIRALL, whose inter-view with Pablo Abeita the Isleta Indiantrader is in this number of the DesertMagazine, was a law student in Cornelland Columbia before he came west manyyears ago. Ill health made it necessary forhim to seek a livelihood in the outdoors,and he became a cowpuncher and laterran his own herds on the Colorado range.Encouraged by his wife, he began writ-ing his experiences, and during the pasteight years has sold manuscripts to bothpulp and slick magazines.He is now out of the cattle business,lives in Denver, Colorado, plays tennisfor recreation, likes Colorado better thanany place on earth—and has a particularaversion for "drugstore cowboys."CARLOS H. ELMER of Kingman,Arizona is studying to follow in hisfather's footsteps, and become a lawyer—but that did not keep him from "crash-ing" the columns of the Desert Magazinethis month both as a photographer and awriter. His picture of Chief Watahamogieof the Havasupai Indians won first placein the monthly photographic contest, andhis story of Pierce ferry captured theLandmark prize.Carlos is 20 years of age, a junior atthe University of California, Los Ange-
les.
He has lived at Kingman 14 years,where his father is a practicing attorney.His favorite desert retreat is Grand Can-yon-Cataract canyon, the home of theHavasupai Indians, and he goes there atevery opportunity.My love of the desert was acquiredamong the bold red escarpments ofUtah," says DAVID LAVENDER, "butmy few trips into the California desertshave awakened a zest to see more ofthem. The color of the hills at eveningis enough to do that to a man."Lavender is the author of the Utahcattle ranch story, MORMON COW-BOY, in this issue of Desert Magazine.He is a free lance writer now residing atOjai, California, and has packed a wideexperience into his 30 years of life. He-went through preparatory school in Den-ver, and was graduated from Princetonin 1931. Then he came west and workedon ranches and in mines, drove cattle onAl Scorup's range for a time, and eventu-ally went to Denver where he wrote ad-vertising copy, edited a trade journal anddid some publicity and radio work. Hedidn't like being chained to a desk, andwent in for free lance writing. His copyhas appeared in Harper's Bazaar, Coun-try Life, Esquire and several pulps andjuveniles. He is married and has a six-year-old son.Among the feature stories to appearin the November number of Desert Mag-azine will be MRS. WHITE MOUN-TAIN SMITH'S biographical sketch ofLorenzo Hubbell, veteran trader on theIndian reservation at Oraibi, Arizona.Desert Magazine's anniversary numberin November will carry the results of arecent poll in which 1000 subscribers, se-lected at random from the mailing list,were asked to vote on the type of featurematerial they prefer to read in the Des-ert Magazine. Forty-five percent of thosereceiving questionnaires responded with-in 30 days after the blank forms weremailed out, and the results are now be-ing tabulated by the magazine
staff.
Contain VENETIAN BLINDS with
LJEUIMI
FLEXIBLE STEEL SLATS
Beauty is the prime requisite in every home, andVenetian blinds made with LIFETIME flexiblesteel slats will add lasting beauty to your home.Here's why: LIFETIME steel slats are givenTWO coats of baked enamel over the "LIFE-ERIZE" rust inhibiting base coat. Every slat istreated by "STA-WAX" the new lustre pre-serving process. LIFETIME steel slat Venetianblinds may be had in 12 beautiful pastel shades,and may be bought from any of the better Ve-netian blind manufacturers and dealers in yourcommunity. They are offered in both the SINGLEshape and the mod-ernistic DOUBLECROWN >—-—«sshape.For your protectionlook for this markof quality.
Bewareoj inferior imita-tions.
UEiTiHI
Products Corp.
Los Angeles,
Calif.
 
DESERT
OCT.
1-30
Nevada deer hunting
sea-
son.2-4 Southwestern Library associationconvention, Albuquerque,
New
Mexico. Miss Dorothy Amman,Dallas, Texas, chairman. Speakersinclude
Mrs. J.
Franc Newcomb,Witter Bynner, Paul
Horgan,
Dean George
P.
Hammond.3-7 Convention
of
Pacific Coastbuilding association, Salt LakeCity, Utah.12-13 Needles, California Water carni-val, municipal playground
on
Lake Havasu behind Parker
dam.
J.
A.
Polzer, chairman.13-27 Nevada open season
on
pheasant,valley
and
mountain quail, grouse,partridge. Counties
may
vary
or
declare closed seasons.14-18 Sixth Annual Western
Safety
conference, Phoenix, Arizona.Delegates from
11
Western states,Alaska, British Columbia, Hawaii,Lower California.15 California dove season closes.Imperial county only:
Oct.
1-Nov.
15.
Sunrise
to
sunset.16-NOV.
15
Arizona deer, bear
and
turkey hunting season. Deerhunting
in
Kaibab national forestbegins
Oct. 25,
applications
to
Walter Mann, Williams, Arizona.16-DEC.
14
California, Nevada
and
Utah duck
and
geese hunting
sea-
son, sunrise
to 4 p. m.
19-20 Gold Rush Days, fourth annualrodeo, barbecue, rock drilling
con-
test,
at
Mojave, California. Spon-sored
by
Mojave Exchange club,William Vail, secretary.19-20 Sierra club schedules Mojave
des-
ert camping trip
in
Pinnacles-Ca-thedral Town area.
(See
DesertMagazine, October
1939)
Leader:Richard Berry.
1250 N.
Norman-die
Ave., Los
Angeles.19-20 First annual exhibition. MojaveDesert
Gem and
Mineral society.Beacon Tavern, Barstow, Cali-fornia. Robert Greer
of
Yermo,chairman.25-27 Quechan Indian fair, Yuma,
Ari-
zona.31 Convention
of
second district.New Mexico Federation
of Wom-
en's clubs, Albuquerque.
(2
days)31 Arizona State Nurses convention.Yuma, Arizona.
(3
days)
Volume
3
OCTOBER,
1940
Number
12
COVERCONTRIBUTORSCALENDARPHOTOGRAPHYPERSONALITYQUIZTREASUREHUMORMINERALSPRIZESINDIANSPUBLIC LANDSTALL TALESMININGHOBBYBOOKSPOETRYTRAVELOGDIARYLANDMARKARTISTPLACE NAMESNEWSBOTANYLETTERSHOBBYINDEXCOMMENT
IN NAVAJOLAND, photograph
by Mrs.
ShreveBallard, Santa Barbara, California.Writers
of the
Desert inside coverOctober events
on the
desert
1
Prize winning pictures
in
August
2
Mormon Cowboy—By DAVID LAVENDER
... 4
A Test
of
Your Desert Knowledge
8
Lost Golden Eagle MineBy JOHN
D.
MITCHELL
9
Hard Rock Shorty—By
LON
GARRISON
... 10
Salt Caves
of the
AncientsBy JOHN
W.
HILTON
11
Amateur Photography Contest
14
Tribesmen
of
Isleta PuebloBy LEON
V.
ALMIRALL
15
"Jackrabbit Homestead" Applications
.... 16
When Scotty
Had it in the Bag
By CHRISTOPHER
C.
WRIGHT
17
Briefs from
the
desert region
18
Cacti—Edited
by
LUCILE HARRIS
19
CORONADO'S QUEST,
and
other reviews
. .21
DESERT WISDOM,
and
other poems
21
Forgotten Oasis
in
Eagle MountainsBy HULBERT BURROUGHS
22
September
at
YaquitepecBy MARSHAL SOUTH
26
Pierce Ferry—By CARLOS
H.
ELMER
28
He Built
a
Monument
on the
Nevada DesertBy JOHN
W.
HILTON
29
Origin
of
names
in the
Southwest
31
Here
and
There
on the
Desert
32
Food, Drink
and
Medicine
for the
NativesBy MARY BEAL
34
Comment from Desert Magazine readers
... 35
Gems
and
Minerals—Edited
by
ARTHUR
L.
EATON
37
Complete index
to
Volume
3,
Desert Magazine
. 40
Just Between
You and
Me—By
the
Editor
... 44
The Desert Magazine is published monthly by the Desert Publishing Company, 63CState Street, El Centro, California. Entered as second class matter October 11, 1937, atthe post office at El Centro. California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Title registered
No.
358865 in U. S. Patent Office, and contents copyrighted 1940 by the Desert PublishingCompany. Permission to reproduce contents must be secured from the editor in writing.RANDALL HENDERSON, Editor.TAZEWELL H. LAMB and LUCILE HARRIS, Associate Editors.Richard B. Older, Advertising Representative, 416 Wall St., Los Angeles,
Calif.
Phone TR 1501Manuscripts and photographs submitted must be accompanied by full return post-
age.
The Desert Magazine assumes no responsibility for damage or loss of manuscriptsor photographs although due care will be exercised for their safety. Subscribers shouldsend notice of change of address to the circulation department by the fifth of the monthpreceding issue.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES:
1
year $2.50
2
years $4.00
3
years $5.00GIFT SUBSCRIPTIONS:
1
subscription $2.50
— two
$4.00
three $5.00Canadian subscriptions
25c
extra, foreign
50c
extraAddress subscription letters
to
Desert Magazine,
El
Centro, California
OCTOBER,
1940

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