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194104 Desert Magazine 1941 April

194104 Desert Magazine 1941 April

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Published by: dm1937 on Feb 21, 2008
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THEN E
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APRIL, 1941
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25 CENTS
 
W>ut&iA.
Life means romance to BETTYWOODS who wrote "Lava Frontier" forthis issue of Desert Magazine. She foundromance when she took a course in writ-ing at Denver University. Her teacher,now a novelist and magazine writer, threwin with the course, a practical demonstra-tion or what a real-life love story might
be.
She married him to find, as she assertsunqualifiedly, that they do live happilyever after.While Clee and Betty Woods have ahome at Tyrone, New Mexico, they spend10 months every year gypsying all overthe country in a house trailer. "But mostof that time," Betty says, "finds our rub-ber-tired home here in our Southwest be-side some great natural wonder, a Navajohogan, a prehistoric ruin or an historiclandmark. Perhaps, even, in some spotthat holds us by its beauty alone. The moreremote or unknown these places are, thelonger we stay."The Woods live truly the royal gypsy
life.
They go wherever fancy or the sea-son calls. Or wherever they are led bytheir great love for the Southwest out-
doors,
with its various manifestations ofthe primitive, ancient and picturesque.
MARY KEELER SMITH, another writ-er new to Desert Magazine readers thismonth is a former school teacher. Shespent 23 years of her life teaching brown-skinned youngsters, from the PhilippineIslands to the Ute reservation in Colorado.
Mrs.
Smith was born and educated inKansas and taught eight years in ruraland city schools in that state. "Then," inher own words, "I went all the way toManila, P. I. to marry a man by the nameof Smith (when the woods at home werefull of them)."We spent our honeymoon on themountain tops of Benguet, near Baguio,the summer capital of the islands, in theland of the Igorots, the head-hunters ofthe Philippines. Later, we went to Cebuwhere my husband was supervisor ofschools, and where I was appointed toteach in the high school. Four months afterwe reached Cebu, our home was complete-ly destroyed by the worst typhoon thathad ever swept the island. Of our furni-ture we had left a phonograph and analarm clock, both capable of running whenwound up."During the years I lived in the Philip-
pines,
I taught among the Visayans, the
EAST^SOUTH
No extra rail fare to go east via fascinating New Orleansand the deep South. Board our famous
Sunset
Limited
or
Argonaut
in Los Angeles. Go via El Paso, San Antonioand Houston. Continue from New Orleans to New Yorkby rail. See your nearest Southern Pacific representative.
Southern Pacific
Ilocanos, and the very cosmopolitan popu-lation of Zamboanga."In 1926, I transferred to the Indianservice and taught for seven years at Saca-ton, Arizona, among the Pima and PapagoIndians. Then at our request, we weretransferred to the Ute reservation in south-western Colorado, for another period ofseven years. However, during the time myhusband was on the Ute reservation, I wasasked to go to the Navajo reservation andorganize day-schools. I worked among theNavajo Indians for three years, then cameback among the Utes."In 1937, I retired from the Indian ser-vice because of physical disability, andcame to California."Among the manuscripts recently ac-cepted by Desert Magazine editors is oneby BARRY GOLDWATER of Phoenix—a vivid story of one of the most desperateepisodes in southwestern history - - theBisbee massacre in 1883. This will appearin an early number of the DM. Just howBarry finds time to carry on his varied ac-tivities is a mystery. He is one of the man-agers of a highly successful business con-cern, is an amateur photographer of highrank, explorer, lecturer, collector of Ari-zoniana—and now he is writing magazinefeatures.Charles Francis Saunders, about whomHOPE GILBERT has written for the Des-ert Magazine this month, is the dean ofsouthwestern desert writers. He is quietand unassuming by nature and since hehas been in comparative retirement for anumber of years, many readers of his booksare not aware that he is
still
keen and ac-tive despite his eighty-odd years. His booksare in the library of every student of desertlore and natural science. He wrote the kindof copy that becomes more interesting withthe passing years.
WILD ROWERS
IT'S WILDFLOWER TIME
IN
IMPERIAL VALLEY
The Desert is in Bloom asNever Before
Send for our bulletin tellingwhere to see them.
B
 flfl
 Ul L
£
CaliforniaCHAMBER OF COMMERCE
The DESERT MAGAZINE
 
DESERT
MAR. 31-APR.
2
Masonic grand lodgesof Arizona meet
in
Phoenix.APR. 4-5 Utah cattle and horse growersassociation meets
at
NewhouseHotel, Salt Lake City.
J. A.
Scor-up
of
Moab, chairman.5 Woman's club flower show
at
Needles, California.Annual White Sands Playday
for
4,000 children. Old-timers picnic,Mescalero Indian dancers. Near
Alamogordo,
New
Mexico.5-6 Riverside chapter
of
Sierra clubto weekend
in
Borrego valley andhike
up
Palm canyon. John Gab-bert, leader.5-6 Palm Springs horse show
and
hunter trials.5-13 Sierra club pack trip from Rain-bow Lodge, Arizona
to
RainbowNatural Bridge, Utah. Side tripsto Inscription House ruins, Nava-jo mountain, Colorado river.
W.
E. (Andy) Andrews, leader.8 Trip
to
Devil's Cactus Gardenand Giant Rock airport, leave fromDesert Museum, Palm Springs,California, 9:30
a. m.
8-9 20th annual Arizona Pioneers
re-
union,
for
old-timers
who
cameto
the
state before 1891. Phoenix.12 Hiking trip
up
Magnesia canyon,leave Palm Springs Desert Mus-eum
at
9:30
a. m.
12 Utah state realty association meetsat Ben Lomond hotel, Ogden.12 First community flower show
at
Chandler, Arizona.12-13 Rainbow
and
Crystal canyons
in
Bullion mountains, northwest
of
Twentynine Palms, California,goal
of
Sierra club. Tom Noble,
leader.
13 Annual rodeo
at
Victorville, Cali-fornia.14-16 Ladies' invitational goif cham-pionship, Palm Springs.17-20 Arizona state Elks meet
in
King-man. Boulder
Dam and
LakeMead trips included
in
program.18-19 Northern Arizona music festival,campus state teachers college,
Flagstaff.
18-19 American Association
of
Healthand Physical education convention,Reno, Nevada. Miss Elsa Saineth,University
of
Nevada, chairman.19 Desert Sun Festival
at
TwentyninePalms, California.26-27 Weekend trip
of
Sierra club
to
Forty-Nine Palms
and
Inscriptioncanyon.
(See
Desert Magazine,
Dec.
1940.)
Dr.
Marko Petinak,leader.30-MAY
2
National Women's Aeronau-tics association meets
in
Albu-querque.
Mrs.
Dale Shockley,president
of
host unit.
fnV V^V
THE
Volume
4
APRIL, 1941Number
6
APRIL,
1941
COVER
DESERT LILIES,
by
Leo Hetzel,
El
Centra, California.
CONTRIBUTORS
Writers
of the
desert
2
CALENDAR
Current events
in
the
desert
3
PHOTOGRAPHY
Prize winning photos
in
February
4
PERSONALITY
He
Prospected
the
Desert—for FlowersBy HOPE GILBERT
5
TREASURE
Lost Yuma Ledge—By JOHN
D.
MITCHELL
... 8
QUIZ
A
Test
of
your desert knowledge
9
BOTANY
Golden Blossoms
on
the DesertBy MARY BEAL
10
FOSSILS
Fossil Hunter
in the
Tropic ShalesBy JOHN W. HILTON
11
PRIZE CONTEST
Announcement
of
Photo contest
14
INDIANS
No-mah the Navajo WeaverBy MARY KEELER SMITH
15
LANDMARK
Elephant's Feet—By WILLARD BRADLEY
...
18
TRAVELOG
Malpais Frontier—By BETTY WOODS
. . . .19
COVER CONTEST
Announcement
of
Contest Winners
22
HUMOR
Hard Rock Shorty—By LON GARRISON
....
22
POETRY
DESERT MIRACLE,
and
other poems
.... 23
ART
OF
LIVING
Vagabond House
at
1000
Palms OasisBy PAUL WILHELM
24
WILDFLOWERS
Where
to
find desert flowers
in
April
28
MINING
Briefs from
the
desert region
30
LETTERS
Comment from Desert Magazine readers
. . . .31
BOOKS
PEOPLE OF THE VALLEY, and other reviews
. . 34
PLACE NAMES
Origin
of
names
in the
Southwest
36
NEWS
Here and There
on
the desert
37
HOBBY
Gems
and
MineralsEdited
by
ARTHUR
L.
EATON
40
COMMENT
Just Between
You and Me,
by the
Editor
....
46
CACTI
Miner's Compass, By GEORGE OLIN
47
The Desert Magazine is published monthly by the Desert Publishing Company, 636State Street, El Centre California. Entered as second class matter October 11, 1937, atthe post office at El Centro, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Title registered
No.
358865 in U. S. Patent Office, and contents copyrighted 1941 by the Desert PublishingCompany. Permission to reproduce contents must be secured from the editor in writing.RANDALL HENDERSON, Editor.TAZEWELL H. LAMB and LUC1LE HARRIS, Associate Editors.Richard B. Older, Advertising Representative, 416 Wall St., Los Angeles,
Calif.
Phone TR 1501Manuscripts and photographs submitted must be accompanied by full return post-
age.
The Desert Magazine assumes no responsibility for damage or loss of manuscriptsor photographs although due care will be exercised for their safety. Subscribers shouldsend notice of change of address to the circulation department by the fifth of the monthpreceding issue.SUBSCRIPTION RATES: 1 year $2.50 — 2 years $4.00 — 3 years $5.00Canadian subscriptions 25c extra, foreign 50c extraAddress subscription letters and correspondence to Desert Magazine, El Centro, California
3

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