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194111 DesertMagazine 1941 November

194111 DesertMagazine 1941 November

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THE
MAGAZINE
4 *.
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:
'\
;
. • \i. •
NOVEMBER, 1941FOURTH ANNIVERSARY25 CENTS
 
The "Hermit" is My Friend . . .
Boise, IdahoDear Desert Folks:I have just received the October issue ofyour wonderful magazine and it was with a dis-tinct shock that I read the article about the"Hermit of Impassable Canyon." The "hermit"is no other than Earl Parot, who is a personalfriend of mine and whom I esteem very high-ly-Of course you have a nice story, but surelythe author was not acquainted with this won-derful man whom it was my pleasure to knowover 30 years.He is certainly a mild-mannered, honorable,fine fellow and I am proud to know him.Your magazine is very interesting and Ihope we will be able to contribute somethingthat will be of value to your publication, and ifthere is anything you have in mind that wemight furnish you, it will be a pleasure to haveyou call on us. With best wishes, I am,ALLEN C. MERRITT
Those Highhat Calilornians . . .
Lovington, N. M.Dear Sirs:I am writing you for a little information.While it may be out of your line of business, Ihope you can tell me anyway. I am planningto spend a few months on the Arizona and Cal-ifornia deserts and as it has been 17 yearssince I was there and things happen so fastand in different ways, I would be pleased toknow if there is any restrictions in regards toentering California and if so, would like toknow what they are.ROGERS LYNCH
Mr. Lynch: In view of the restrictionsnow imposed at state boundaries not onlyby California but by a number of otherstates that is a very proper question. How-ever, I am glad to assure you that if youhave a certificate for your car. and bring noboll worms or other plant pests along withyou there will be no difficulty.
K.H.
Mine was Too Rich . . .
Pasadena, CaliforniaDear Mr. Henderson:While I have been away on an extended tourthrough the northwest, I have been a constantreader of the Desert Magazine. I find it in mostall news stands everywhere.In the October issue on page 20, in an ar-ticle by G. Dale Hamilton entitled "Bonanza onTreasure Hill"—it is stated that silver ore atHamilton, Nevada, yielded $27,000 to the ton.I visited this old "ghost" town late in Au-gust and heard a lot of tales about it as usual.But I am wondering whether or not at that time,the price of silver was as high as $1,121/2 perounce. That is the price they must have gottenand it must have yielded 24,000 ounces tothe ton.Figure it
yourself,
any way you like, andthen draw your own conclusions.A couple of years ago, there was a storycirculated around Bodie, that ore was discov-ered in an old shaft there, at the 800 foot levelthat assayed $3,000 to the pound, and manypeople repeated the yarn, and many believed it.I have always been more or less a skeptic inregard to these old tales of long ago, and maybeI am "all wet" but still—I wonder? There isthe Peg Leg, the Lost Dutchman, Weepah anda host of others all in the same vein, that makeme reach for the salt shaker. Skeptically yours,ROY CARSONP.S.—I am not looking for lost mines, but Iget a kick out of reading about them in Desert(the best magazine in the West). So-what?
—R.C.
n
o
Birthday Greetings . . .
Dear Randall:El Centro, California
Those Tenderfeet
. . .
A jo, ArizonaDear Desert Magazine:I wish you would tell the whole wide worldhow to pronounce the name of this town. Thetenderfeet insist on calling us "Ah-jo"—j as injolly. Sounds like the monkey man in a side-show.There isn't a prettier place name in theSouthwest than Ajo when it is given the cor-rect Spanish pronunciation—Ah-ho.The Ajo members of your Desert Magazineclan will be forever grateful for a little helpthrough your very readable columns.BILL VESTAL
At Lead Pipe Springs . . .
Los Angeles, CaliforniaDear Sir:Enclosed please find a picture of a tamebird that came into our camp over the Laborday weekend. At that time the Los Angeleslapidary society had a field trip near LeadPipe springs, in the desert east of Randsburg.On our arrival to camp Saturday morning,we noticed this unusually tame bird runningabout. It seemed utterly fearless and just keptout of arm's reach. Bread crumbs were offeredit, but it was not interested. However, it soonshowed us what kind of food it liked, when itfollowed the erratic flight of a grasshopper,caught it and crept into the bushes to eat it.Several men in the party caught grasshoppers,which the bird took from their hands. It alsostopped hunting food itself and hung aroundfor the men to provide the insects.When a person left camp, the bird wouldfollow him, expecting a handout, and wouldbe flying and running and keeping almost un-der the feet, until it was convinced no grass-hoppers were forthcoming. Then it would flyback to camp.It stayed around all day but at evening itjoined three birds that chanced to be flying by.We thought that was the last of the bird, butearly next morning we found it perched on thecot of one of our members, waiting for itsbreakfast.As I happened to get more grasshoppers forthe bird than some of the others, it made mycamp its headquarters and followed me everytime I left the spot. This picture was taken ofthe bird eating a grasshopper from my hand. Ifound by holding the grasshopper firmly, thebird would fly to my hand and pick the insectuntil it was consumed. This was done several
times,
and limited only by the lack of grass-hoppers.I am not sure of the identity of the bird, buthazard the guess it was a Dwarf Cow Bird. Itwas about the size of a black bird, plumagewas a drab brown with white edges around thefeathers. The breast was full, with beak straightand strong and eyes black. None of us heard itmake any cry.When we broke camp Labor day, it was stillthere. Perhaps some of your readers could cor-rectly identify the bird from this rather meagerdescription and possibly someone might comein contact with it, in the vicinity of Lead Pipesprings where we were looking for blue agatenodules.The bird event was one of the highlights ofour trip, and all enjoyed its friendly visit.CHARLES G. SCHWEITZERWhen I picked up the October issue of Des-ert Magazine and I saw that it contained theindex to Volume IV, I realized then that youhave completed your fourth year of publication.Congratulations upon what you haveachieved and congratulations to you upon at-taining an ideal which I know you had inyour mind for many years. The Desert Maga-zine has become a wonderful publication un-der your leadership. May you have many times4 times 4 times 4 years of continued success.ROBERT HAYS
Thanks, Bob, but the ideal isn't aituinedyet. —R.H.
Jitterbug for Rockhounds
. . .
Denver, ColoradoDear Mr. Henderson:Private David E. Smith's letter in the Augustissue of Desert Magazine reminds me that thereis a general agreement in this part of the coun-try that the new army car, known around theposts as the Jeep or Jitterbug, is really idealfor rock hunting, in the mountains as well asthe desert. I believe that if mineral collectorsrealize this, the government will have littletrouble in disposing of what are left of themwhen the wars are over. Each mineral clubshould own one to be rented to members whoare making trips off the improved highways.Desert Magazine might remind its readers aboutthis when the time comes.RICHARD M. PEARLSecretaryColorado Mineral Society
"Maze was Always There" . . .
San Bernardino, CaliforniaDear Mr. Henderson:After reading the very good letter of Fred-erick C. Butler in the October number of TheDesert Magazine in which he comments on the"Mystic Maze" south of Needles, I would likewith your permission, to say a few words my-self on that subject.To begin with, one man's guess as to its ori-gen is as good as another's for nobody knows.Until the first rough auto road was builtacross the hills from Needles to the Santa Fe To-pock bridge the maze was to all intents un-known. (That road connected with the rail-road bridge, which was planked over to allowpassage of automobiles.)Then the maze, close to the highway, beganto attract attention. Some years ago a Los An-geles magazine expressed the belief that rail-road engineers in the search for beds of gravelneeded in the bridge construction were respon-sible for the maze.Now, as I very well remember, preliminarywork on that bridge began in 1888. Mark the
date.
R. J. Halsey came to Needles with the rail-road in 1883. In 1886, while traveling on foottowards Needles from the Black Metal mineof Pete McGuire down the river, he came uponthe maze but thought nothing of it, for, intruth, it is not at all impressive.Years later, after it had been formally "dis-covered," Halsey, Wm. Hutt and the writerwent down to look at it. "Shucks," said BobHalsey, "I saw that in 1886 and forgot allabout it."Subsequently the three of us, individuallyand collectively, questioned many old Indiansabout it and invariably the answer was: "Wedon't know who made it. It was always there."
CHARLES BATTYETHE DESERT MAGAZINE
 
DESERT
Gcdest&aA,
OCT. 31-NOV. 1 Palm
Springs-
Coachella Valley boat races, Sal-ton Sea, California.OCT. 31-NOV. 1 Nevada's 77th Ad-mission day, Carson City. Parade,pageant and "1864 Ball," Satur-day.OCT. 31-NOV. 1 Annual livestockshow, Ogden, Utah. E. J. Fjeld-sted, show manager.NOV. 1-2 Home-coming for alumni ofArizona State Teachers college.
Flagstaff.
Football game Satur-day with N. M. College of Agri-culture, followed by Home-com-ing ball.1-8 Deer season in Ruidoso and Sac-ramento areas, New Mexico.Special permit applications fromstate game office, Santa Fe, be-fore Oct. 20.
1-DEC.
31 Nevada season
on
mountainhare and cottontail; varies incounties.2 AH Saints' day at Taos Pueblo,New Mexico.2 Pheasant season opens in Utah.Counties vary 2 to 5 days.6 Frederick Jagel, MetropolitanOpera tenor, guest artist with Al-buquerque, New Mexico, CivicSymphony orchestra, opening10th concert season.6-8 Arizona City Days, marking 70thanniversary of Arizona City asYuma county seat. At Yuma,Arizona.8 Masonic ceremonial at CarlsbadCaverns, New Mexico. Membersof Shrine Temples of San Diego,Phoenix, El Paso, Albuquerqueand Reno among those to attend.8-16 Arizona State Fair, Phoenix.Zach T. Addington, chairman.9-11 Mojave Empire rodeo, Calicoguest ranch at Yermo, California.12 Fiesta of Don Diego, Tesuque In-dian Pueblo, New Mexico.13-15 50th annual convention of Ari-zona Education association atPhoenix Union High school.13-15 Fiesta del Sol, Phoenix, Arizona.15-16 14th A. A. U. Swimming andDiving meet, El Mirador hotel,Palm Springs, California.16 Gadsden fete, Old Mesilla, NewMexico. Celebrates consumma-tion of the Gadsden purchase,bringing it into the U. S.16-30 Arizona open season on quail.Extended to December 16 inYuma and Mohave counties.29 Annual Festival, Brawley, Cali-fornia (tentative).Utah open season on ducks, geese, cootcontinues through November to
Dec.
14 (opened Oct. 16).
Volume5 NOVEMBER. 1941 Number 1COVER
DEATH VALLEY, Photograph
by
Josef Muench, SantaBarbara.
LETTERS
Comment from Desert Magazine readers
... 2
CALENDAR
Current events on the Desert 3
FANTASY
Midnight at Bandelier
By
MORA M. BROWN 4
MAN-HUNT
On the Trail of Willie-boy
By
JAMES L. CARLING 6
CONTEST
Monthly prize contest announcement
. . . .10
PHOTOGRAPHY
Prize winning photographs
in
September
... 12
GEM
TRIP
Sparkling Gems in the Aquarius Range
By
RANDALL HENDERSON 13
FICTION
Hard Rock Shorty of Death Valley
By
LON GARRISON 16
PERSONALITY
He Belongs to the Panamints
By
LEROY and MARGARET BALES ... 17
CEREMONIAL
Ute Sun Dance, by CHARLES KELLY 22
WEATHER
Desert temperatures
in
September
24
ART
OF
LIVING
Desert Refuge,
by
MARSHAL SOUTH
.... 25
LOST MINE
Lost 'Captain Dick' Mine
By
JOHN D. MITCHELL 27
PUZZLE
Desert Quiza test of your Desert knowledge . . 28
LANDMARK
Hickman Bridge,
by
LOUISE McHUGH
....
29
MINING
Briefs from the Desert region 30
NEWS
Here and There on the Desert 31
BOOKS
Reviews of Southwestern books 34
PLACE NAMES
Origin of names in the Southwest 36
HOBBY
Gems
and
MineralsEdited
by
ARTHUR
L.
EATON
. . . .37
COMMENT
Just Between
You and Me,
by
the
Editor
.... 42
POETRY
Desert Memories, and other poems 43
The Desert Magazine is published monthly by the Desert Publishing Company, 686State Street, El Centro, California. Entered as second class matter October 11, 1987, atthe post office at El Centro, California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Title registered
No.
858865 in U. S. Patent Office, and contents copyrighted 1941 by the Desert PublishingCompany. Permission to reproduce contents must be secured from the editor in writing.RANDALL HENDERSON, Editor. LUCILE HARRIS, Associate Editor.Richard B. Older, Advertising Representative, 416 Wall St., Los Angeles,
Calif.
Phone TR 1601Manuscripts and photographs submitted must be accompanied by full return post-
age.
The Desert Magazine assumes no responsibility for damage or loss of manuscriptsor photographs although due care will be exercised for their safety. Subscribers shouldsend notice of change of address to the circulation department by the fifth of the monthpreceding issue.SUBSCRIPTION RATESOne year, including gold-embossed loose leaf binder $3.00Two years, including binders for both years 5.00You may deduct 50c each for binders if not desired.Canadian subscriptions 25c extra, foreign 50c extra.
Address
correspondence to
Pesert
Magazine, $3$ state St., El Centro, California.
NOVEMBER, 1941

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