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The Sorrow With Downward Look.

The Sorrow With Downward Look.

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Published by glennpease
BY JAMES MARTINEAU.

Mark X. 20-22.

AND HE ANSWERED AND SAID UNTO HIM, 'MASTER, ALL THESE THINGS
HAVE I OBSERVED FROM MT YOUTH.' THEN JESUS, BEHOLDING HIM,
LOVED HIM, AND SAID UNTO HIM, ' ONE THING THOU LACKEST ; GO
THY WAY, SELL WHATSOEVER THOU HAST, AND GIVE TO THE POOR,
AND THOU SHALT HAVE TREASURE IN HEAVEN ; AND COME, TAKE
UP THE CROSS, AND FOLLOW ME.' AND HE WAS SAD AT THAT SAY-
ING, AND WENT AWAY GRIEVED ; FOR HE HAD GREAT POSSESSIONS.
BY JAMES MARTINEAU.

Mark X. 20-22.

AND HE ANSWERED AND SAID UNTO HIM, 'MASTER, ALL THESE THINGS
HAVE I OBSERVED FROM MT YOUTH.' THEN JESUS, BEHOLDING HIM,
LOVED HIM, AND SAID UNTO HIM, ' ONE THING THOU LACKEST ; GO
THY WAY, SELL WHATSOEVER THOU HAST, AND GIVE TO THE POOR,
AND THOU SHALT HAVE TREASURE IN HEAVEN ; AND COME, TAKE
UP THE CROSS, AND FOLLOW ME.' AND HE WAS SAD AT THAT SAY-
ING, AND WENT AWAY GRIEVED ; FOR HE HAD GREAT POSSESSIONS.

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Published by: glennpease on Feb 27, 2014
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THE SORROW WITH DOWNWARD LOOK. BY JAMES MARTINEAU. Mark X. 20-22. AND HE ANSWERED AND SAID UNTO HIM, 'MASTER, ALL THESE THINGS HAVE I OBSERVED FROM MT YOUTH.' THEN JESUS, BEHOLDING HIM, LOVED HIM, AND SAID UNTO HIM, ' ONE THING THOU LACKEST ; GO THY WAY, SELL WHATSOEVER THOU HAST, AND GIVE TO THE POOR, AND THOU SHALT HAVE TREASURE IN HEAVEN ; AND COME, TAKE UP THE CROSS, AND FOLLOW ME.' AND HE WAS SAD AT THAT SAY-ING, AND WENT AWAY GRIEVED ; FOR HE HAD GREAT POSSESSIONS. What made this young man retire in sorrow from before the face of Christ ? That the demand made upon him was quite irrational, all political econo-mists would confidentially assure him. That he had every reason to be satisfied with a life so pure and orderly, would be declared by every worthy neighbor, and all judicious divines. And if he carried home with him any traces of the sadness with which he turned from the eye of Jesus, no doubt he was cheered up, as far as might be, by the loving rebukes of wife or friends, chiding his misgivings, and laugh-ing his thoughtfulness away. If a man who keeps all
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the commandments may not be happy, who may ? With a memory clear of reproach from the youth up, whence can he have drawn the cloud to shade so innocent a soul ? All the sources of inward care and conflict seem to be excluded here ; and we appear to have the perfect representative of a life at peace. To THE SORROW WITH DOAVXWARD LOOK. 301 say nothing of the ruler's property, which was ample for external comfort, he had fulfilled the one grand requisite of moral contentment and repose ; he had established a harmony between his perceptions and his actions, and framed his mode of conduct by his sentiments of right. Now there is, apparently, no other condition of inward peace than this. All men feel the ivorth of the spiritual affections that solicit them, and revere the obligation of the better to ex-clude the worse. All men feel also the comparative strength of these same affections, and find in some a power which others ineffectually dispute. Wherever the order of strength agrees exactly with the order of worth ; and wherever the desire known to be the highest, is also the most intense, and no brute pas-
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sion usurps the throne instead of serving as the footstool ; wherever the habits are shaped and pro-portioned by the scale of excellence and beauty within ; there, strife and sorrow cannot be ; there, is the glad consent between hand and heart, the concord between our worship and our will, which charms away the approach of care. This harmony may be obtained in either of two ways ; by tuning up the life to the key-note of thought ; or by letting down the thought to the pitch of the actual life. He who will persistently follow his highest impulses and convictions, who will trust only these amid noisier claims, and constrain himself to go with them alike in their faintness and their might, shall not find his struggle everlasting; his wrestlings shall become fewer and less terrible ; the hand of God, so dim to him and doubtful at the first, shall in the end be the only thing that is clear and sure : his best shall be his strongest too. But this, which is a holy peace, is not 26 302 THE SORROW WITH DOWNWARD LOOK. the only rest open to the contradictions of our nature.
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