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194209 Desert Magazine 1942 September

194209 Desert Magazine 1942 September

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THE
M A G A Z
Kra
SEPTEMBER. 194225 CENTS
 
LETTERS...
Indian Covers Preferred . . .
Alhambra, CaliforniaDear Mr. Henderson:Since the arrival of the August number ofDesert with its interesting Navajo cover, oneof the best, I have been looking over againthe covers of past issues. It seems to me thatthroughout the nearly five years of its existenceDesert Magazine has set a remarkable standardin covers and these seem to fall into a few dis-tinct classes.The group which I find most attractive arethe six I will call the Indian human interestgroup. Pueblo Boy, Weaver, Navajo MedicineMan, In Navajo Land, Navajo Youth and thelast number, Navajo.Next is a group of three headed by DesertCharlie, then Baby Burro and Arizona. Thencomes that outstanding group of Indian coun-try scenics, Shiprock, Rainbow Bridge, Monte-zumas Castle, Death Valley and BetatakinRuins.But I often turn back and feast my eyes onthe cover of No. 1, Vol. 1 and after nearly fiveyears that first cover seems to stand in a classby
itself,
in artistry, coloring and desert interestthe best of all.Please don't think I even pretend to be anauthority on art or magazine covers. I like Des-ert Magazine and all its covers and think thewholt series makes a really outstanding collec-tion, one any publisher might well be proud of.May your standard never grow less and yoursubscription list exceed your fondest expecta-tions.WILL H. THRALL
"Mosquito Rock" . . .
Boulder City, NevadaDear Mr. Henderson:I wish to point out an error in the July issueof Desert Magazine. Mr. Jerome's descriptionof Elephant Rock is quite accurate, but thephotograph in question is not of the "ElephantRock." I think "Mosquito Rock" is more de-scriptive of the formation shown. This rock,strangely enough, is some four or five milesfrom the Elephant Rock in the same Valley ofFire. It may be seen by continuing on the roaddescribed by Mr. Jerome approximately twomiles beyond the Mouse Tank Trail. It is to theleft of the road, instead of the right, just overthe crest of the last fiery ridge. The photographwas taken looking toward the Virgin river armof Lake Mead, which could be seen except forthe hill in the background. Perhaps this is whyMr. Jerome thought the negative had been re-versed.I have driven far into British Columbia, andhave seen parts of Wyoming, Colorado, andevery state west of the Rockies. I have viewedthat summation of all grandeur: the Grand Can-yon ; but, I was still much impressed with theValley of Fire. It appears to have been createdin a moment of wildest abandon. The abundantpetroglyphs, so intimate of the men who livedthere long ago, seem doubly thought-provokingin that setting of weird shapes and startlingcolor.Being a newcomer to southern Nevada, I amnot writing as a booster for this locality. I doso in appreciation of your splendid magazine.Mrs. Parker joins me in wishing you continuedsuccess with it.FRED W. PARKER
To Keep the Records Straight. . .
Gentlemen:Quartzsite, ArizonaI am not a critic, but just to keep thingsstraight, on the Yerington page in your Juneissue, you have a -.Vetch of a man and a wind-lass. The rope runs on the beam in the wrongdirection as to the position of the man. Alsoin the caption under the picture on page 37,"Hammering gold to free it from silver, etc."-the silver and the gold are not separate, butmixed.J. R. CURRIER
On Skinning Rattlers . . .
Los Gatos, CaliforniaDear Editors:I read your story "Rattlesnake Skins Are MyHobby" with more than usual interest.For more than 40 years I have been killingrattlesnakes, and skinning them. Four years agoon the 15th of September I killed a large rattler.On skinning it I found four young rattlers, eachencased in a tough membrane. The snakesvaried in size from four to seven inches, eachbeing complete as to shape of head, fangs, andbutton.I use a different system in skinning my rat-tlers. My method is to lay them bottom side upand cut them open with a heavy pair of scissorsbefore skinning.Several times the persistent call of a jay haslocated a rattler for me. Positively the onlygood word I have for a jay.IDA RAILEY
More About the Havasupai . . .
Blythe, CaliforniaCompanero:I appreciate your choice of words and theirsrrangements when you write: "Neither triballegend nor the research of archaeologists havetold us when and why the Havasupai Indiansmigrated to the majestic Havasu canyon."Old Captain Navajo, who was not a Navajo,told me that they came from the Walapais; thatthey pulled out after a three-day tribal con-ference when the tribe was divided over thematter of tribal tradition in regard to squawsbeing allowed to cohabit with men of otherraces or tribes. They went down into that can-yon, not because it was majestic, but for protec-tion.Captain Navajo told me that once the NavajoIndians tossed three of the Supai bucks off intothe canyon just to see what they would looklike after they landed, 3,000 feet below.The man who did that mining work in thecanyon was Adam Chunning. He stopped withme for a week during a snow storm. That was 50years ago and he was on his way to do his as-sessment work.In 1889 the la grippe, after killing manyRussians, started eastward around the world. InJanuary, 1890, Bill Bass and I procured somequinine, after which Bill paid the Supais a visitto see if they had lived through the epidemic.Bill found them taking the hot water vs. icewater treatment. I presume they would practi-cally all have died if Bill hadn't taken charge.Later in the spring of 1890 the entire tribe cameout and camped near me on top of the plateau.As nearly as I could estimate there were be-tween 60 and 80 of them at the time.ED. F. WILLIAMS
Neither Rubber Nor Gas
. . .
Payson, UtahGentlemen:Welcome the articles of Charles Kelly inD.M. He sure knows his Utah, and should havemany more descriptions for us.With him and Marshal South, well, you willhave me on your list for life. Glad Marshal hashis burros. No rubber shortage will bother himnow.DR. L. D. PFOUTS
Honoring "Shady" Myrick . . .
Carson City, NevadaDear Sir:I was mildly surprised at the use of the word"Myrickite" in your item, "Identity of Opalite,"in the July issue of Desert.I had always associated the word with a gold-en variety of chalcedony, and somehow stillbelieve the name originated from "Shady" My-rick.Shady lived at Lead Springs, California, nearthe head of Panamint Valley, about 1922, whenI knew him. When I visited his camp at thattime he told me about the golden chalcedony hehad found, and stated:"I'm sorry Mac, but I haven't got a specimennow, but it was the most beautiful thing youever saw—and they're going to name it "my-rickite."Since then, whenever I have seen any of theopals or agates, I have thought of Shady's "my-rickite," but have never taken the trouble tolook it up until I read your item. Am unableto find the name in Dana or Kraus, so assumeit is somewhat restricted to local use.However, this brings to mind Shady's story,as I remember it.G. L. McINTYRF.
G.L.M.
—/
think, you are correct in as-suming Myrickite was named for "Shady"Myrick. In his "Quartz Family Minerals"Duke merely uses the name as a synonym
for opalite.
R.H.
Weatlt.&i
FROM PHOENIX BUREAUTemperatures— DegreesMean for July - 92.7Normal for July 89.8High on July 6 , 116.0Low on July 15 , 70.0Rain— InchesTotal for July .1.24Normal for July 1.07Weather-Days clear 19Days partly cloudy 10Days cloudy 2Percentage of possible sunshine 88E. L. FELTON, Meteorologist.FROM YUMA BUREAUTemperatures— DegreesMean for July 94.2(Exceeded only once since 1878.)Normal for July 90.8High on July 7 117.0Low on July 19 73.0Rain— InchesTotal for July 0.08Normal for July 0.18Weather—Days clear 29Days partly cloudy 2Days cloudy 0Sunshine, 98 percent, 426 hours of sunshineout of a possible 437 hours.Colorado river—Discharge from Boulderdam averaged around 20,000 second feet.Storage during the month was nearlystationary.JAMES H. GORDON, Meteorologist.
THE DESERT MAGAZINE
 
DESERT
AUG. 28-29 Annual horse show, munici-pal stadium, Ogden, Utah.AUG. 29-30 Rocky Mountain Federationof mineral societies annual
con-
vention
at
Salt Lake City, Utah.SEPT.
2-5
Salt Lake county fair, Murray.Utah.
E. O.
Brothers, manager.1-27
Two
exhibitions
at
Museum
of
Northern Arizona,
Flagstaff:
An-
cient Life
in the
Rocks
of Ari-
zona
and
Geography
for an Ari-
zona Tourist.5-61015230th Annual Fiesta, Santa
Fe,
New Mexico, commemorating
de-
livery
of the
villa from
the
Indi-ans
in
1693-
Includes ceremony"Burning
of
Zozobra," Conquis-taciores
Ball,
DeVargas Pageint.Candlelight procession, Roofshow
and
crowning
of
FiesnQueen
at La
Fonda hotel.Harvest dance,
San
Ildefons-)Pueblo,
New
Mexico.Annual rodeo, Grants,
New Mex-
ico.
Mark Elkins, chairman.Fiesta, Tajique,
New
ajiqueMexico.TorreonMexico.ManzanoMexico.Fiesta, Torreon,
New
Fiesta, Manzano,
New
15 Mexican colony celebration
of
Mexican Independence, Roswell,New Mexico.16 Mexican Independence celebra-tion
at
Socorro,
New
Mexico.19 Annual fiesta
and
dance, LagumIndian pueblo,
New
Mexico.25-27 Annual rodeo,
Hot
Springs,
New
Mexico.27-OCT.
4
New
Mexico State Fair,
Al-
buquerque.28-29 Taos County Fair
and San
Geronimo fiesta, Taos,
New
Mexico.29 Annual fiesta. Feast
Dav of San
Miguel, Socorro,
New
Mexico.ARIZONA HUNTING SEASONSDeer: North
of
Gila river, except Pina!mountains
in
Gila
and
Pinalcounties,
Oct.
16-Nov.
15;
southof Gila river
and
including
th:
Pinal mountains,
Nov.
1-Nov.
30
on white tail deer;
Nov. 16-30
oi
desert mule deer.Turkey
and
Bear: Open north
of
Gilariver only; corresponds
to
deerseason.Deer:
In
Kaibab forest limited
to
1,000
permits,
Nov.
1-15.
Antelope: Sept. 19-Oct.
3;
limited
per-
mits.
Elk:
Nov. 1-30,
special permits
as
wellas regular hunting licenses.Squirrel: Fort valley refuge north
of
Flagstaff open
Aug.
16-Nov.
15.
;^
*>>'
Volume
5
SEPTEMBER,
1942
Number
11
COVERLETTERSWEATHERCALENDARCRAFTSMANMIGRATIONRITUALCONTESTNATUREPUZZLEART
OF
LIVINGPOETRYHOBBYFICTIONADVENTUREMINERALOGYLANDMARKNEWSCONTRIBUTORSHOBBYCRAFTSMININGCOMMENTBOOKS
DESERT TRAILS, photograph
by E. F.
Tucker, BoulderCity, Nevada.Comment from Desert Magazine readers
... 2
July temperatures
on the
desert
2
Current events
en the
desert
3
Prize winning photograph
in
July
4
Refuge
on the
ColoradoBy RANDALL HENDERSON
5
Rain Sing,
by
CHARLES KELLY
: 9
Prize story announcement
10
Hawk
of the
WastelandsBy GEORGE McCLELLAN BRADT
. . . .11
Desert Quiz—A test
of
your desert knowledge
. .12
Desert Refuge,
by
MARSHAL SOUTH
. . . .13
Horned Toad,
and
other poems
15
Nature's
A B C's on the
Yuma MesaBy JOS.
C.
COYLE
16
Hard Rock Shorty
of
Death ValleyBy
LON
GARRISON
18
By Boat
to the
Lake
of
MysteryBy GODFREY SYKES
19
Fairy Crystals From
an Old
Mine DumpBy BERTHA
G.
BROWN
25
Old Governor's MansionBy GRACE
P.
McELWAIN
28
Here
and
There
on the
Desert
29
Writers
of the
Desert
32
Gems
and
Minerals—Edited
by
ARTHUR
L.
EATON
33
Amateur
Gem
Cutter—by LELANDE QUICK
. . 36
Briefs from
the
desert region
37
Just Between
You and
Me—by
the
Editor
... 38
"The
New
Trail"
and
other reviews
39
The Desert Magazine is published monthly by the Desert Publishing Company, 636State Street, El Ontro, California. Entered as second class matter October 11, 1937, atthe post office at El Centre California, under the Act of March 3, 1879. Title registered
No.
Bu886E> in u. S. Pa tnt Office, ar.cl contents copyrighted 1U42 by the Desert PublishingCompany. Permission to reproduce contents must be secured from the editor in writing.RANDALL HENDERSON, Editor. LUCILE HARRIS, Associate Editor.Manuscripts and photographs submitted must be accompanied by full return post-
age.
The Desert Magazine assumes no responsibility for damage or loss of manuscriptsor photographs although due care will be exercised for their safety. Subscribers shouldsend notice of change of address to the circulation department by the fifth of the monthpreceding issue.SUBSCRIPTION RATESCne year, including gold-embrssed loose leaf binder $3.00Two years, including binders for both years 5.00You may deduct 50c each for b'nders if not desired.Canad'an subscriptions 25c extra, fc reign 50c extra.Address correspondence to Desert Magazine, 636 State St., El Centro, California.
SEPTEMBER,
1942

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